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Is my power supply 110 and 220 compatible?

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May 29, 2011 8:02:09 PM

Hello, I just moved to Germany and I was going to plug my computer into the wall when I noticed that my PS did not have a red selector switch. Is this normal? Its a new PS so I thought that this was going to be European compatible just like my laptop. Here is the model number:XION Power Real XON-1250P14HE 1250W ATX. I went to the website and it states that the PS runs on mains 110 to 220. I am not sure if that means weather or not it will be adaptive to the German wall outlets, but I don't want to just plug it in to find out ether. =) Please let me know, thanx.
a c 274 ) Power supply
May 29, 2011 9:08:55 PM

Your power supply features Active PFC which regulates the voltage to accept worldwide voltages.
The only thing you'll have to change is your psu power cord to European standard receptacle Type F (Schuko).
Your psu end is probably a standard C13 TYPE.
I'd just buy one at any electronics/pc shop when you get there=cheap.
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a b ) Power supply
May 30, 2011 3:02:34 AM

i have actually seen psu reviews where the psu claims it will do both, but lacks the circuitry for one or the other. Either way Xion is not a good quality psu.
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May 30, 2011 5:37:02 AM

on the back by your on off switch on your psu there should be a little inset tab that will allow you to swicth from 110 to 220
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May 30, 2011 8:21:11 AM

Thanks guys. Yes it has a sticker next to the power switch that says "Active PFC". I should be OK now. I am going to just buy another cord and plug it in. I think this one will have circuitry to do both voltages, hence the large sticker on the back stating that it has the PFC function. Many thanx!
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a b ) Power supply
May 30, 2011 12:49:19 PM

midarkmind said:
Hello, I just moved to Germany and I was going to plug my computer into the wall when I noticed that my PS did not have a red selector switch. Is this normal? Its a new PS so I thought that this was going to be European compatible just like my laptop. Here is the model number:XION Power Real XON-1250P14HE 1250W ATX. I went to the website and it states that the PS runs on mains 110 to 220. I am not sure if that means weather or not it will be adaptive to the German wall outlets, but I don't want to just plug it in to find out ether. =) Please let me know, thanx.



Active PFC ( Power Factor Correction ) has nothing to do with input voltage compatibility. It is the ratio of real power to apparent power in the ciruit. The real power is the capacitive component of the circuit... While the apparent power is the product of current and votage. Higher power factor means higher efficiency of the power supply unit.

Switching supplies are generally LOW Power Factor linear rectifiers. Active PFC (inductive/capacitive networks) are employed to correct or increase the power factor of the circuit. PC Power supplies are switching type that's the reason why Active PFC are employed.

"I has nothing to do with what is Called in the Industry as AUTO VOLT ... Meaning adaptable to All AC Voltage Ratings and Frequency"
"AGAIN ACTIVE PFC HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH VOLTAGE COMPATIBILITY BET US & EU"

Both are electrical AC parameter PFC & Input voltage... PFC is highly dependent on Capacitance, Inductance and Resistance of the circuit or network.


US single phase input voltage is 110V 60 HZ, EU is 220/240 50 HZ....

For a PSU to be compatible for US and EU it must clearly stipulate in minimum as:

100/240V, 50/60HZ.... The input voltage and operating input frequency must be very clear. The US input freq is 60HZ... EU's input freq is 50 HZ. Take note for example that there are other countries that operates 220VAC @ 60HZ and is not compatible with EU.




Here is a simplified PFC concept for understanding of common people PFC concepts of its theory:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_factor

Other than that computations require calculus and differential equation


For the specific PSU you are asking:

If what is posted in NewEgg Details is correct then that PSU will work:

Freq: 47 HZ to 63 HZ
Input Voltage: 115V to 240V

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


I question the reliability of XION brand supply.... I don't recommend this specific brand.

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a b ) Power supply
May 30, 2011 12:50:34 PM


"Active PFC has nothing to do with what is Called in the Industry as AUTO VOLT ... Meaning adaptable to All AC Voltage Ratings and Frequency"
"AGAIN ACTIVE PFC HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH VOLTAGE COMPATIBILITY BET US & EU"

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a b ) Power supply
May 30, 2011 12:52:48 PM

If one does not fully understand the concept behind certain electrical parameters he/she should refrain from quoting it in reference for certain needs or application.



"Little Knowledge is dangerous"
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a b ) Power supply
May 30, 2011 1:05:20 PM

davcon said:
Your power supply features Active PFC which regulates the voltage to accept worldwide voltages.
The only thing you'll have to change is your psu power cord to European standard receptacle Type F (Schuko).
Your psu end is probably a standard C13 TYPE.
I'd just buy one at any electronics/pc shop when you get there=cheap.


"Active PFC don't requlate Input Voltage". Power Factor Correction has nothing to do with Input Voltage Regulation.

"Input Voltage Regulation is another " electrical parameter and require a different circuit.

Active PFC are Capacitive and Inductive Networks that employed to improve Power Factor Rating of PSU (i.e. switching supplies). The higher PFC rating for PSU is better..... (.90 to 1.0).

Consult with your local electrical engineering professor for more details
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June 1, 2011 8:19:57 AM

Well I think that I just go hoodwinked by XION! I bought the correct power cable and tried it. However this power supply is making like a screeching sound when I plugged it into the wall. Maybe the PS is really missing the circuitry after all, I'm not quite sure at this point. I guess it could have been damaged on the plane ride over here. I think I am going to have to buy another PS to test. I live in a 60 year old German house so maybe there isn't enough watts coming out of the wall outlet? I will update the thread though when I figure it out.
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a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2011 10:41:55 AM

so is it working and making screeching? if it was missing the circuitry it would just blow the fuse and go dead.
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a c 275 ) Power supply
June 1, 2011 2:56:42 PM

The screeching doesnt seem good, the XION is listed as having APFC with full range input so it shouldnt be having issues, it might just be coil whine but its weird for it to start up when you move it to a new country.

@leon - two things; first, edit is a wonderful feature so you dont quadruple post; second, the way APFC is implemented in a computer PSU it comes complete with the full range input because its a boost converter before the primary side so it automatically adjusts itself for lower or higher voltages to make the output voltage the same so APFC is the reason for the full range input on PSUs.
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a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2011 4:53:35 PM

hunter315 said:
The screeching doesnt seem good, the XION is listed as having APFC with full range input so it shouldnt be having issues, it might just be coil whine but its weird for it to start up when you move it to a new country.

@leon - two things; first, edit is a wonderful feature so you dont quadruple post; second, the way APFC is implemented in a computer PSU it comes complete with the full range input because its a boost converter before the primary side so it automatically adjusts itself for lower or higher voltages to make the output voltage the same so APFC is the reason for the full range input on PSUs.




Refer to your local University Electrical Engineer Professor to understand about APFC...
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a c 275 ) Power supply
June 1, 2011 5:12:29 PM

Im a fourth year electrical engineering major, i am quite familiar with power factor and PF correction, and im not trying to say that the PF itself is why there is full range input. Allow me to explain better, its not the PF correction itself that provides the full range input, its the way its implemented using a boost converter. The controller of the converter senses the input voltage and adjusts the converter to provide a constant output voltage, the boost converter is selected so it can take an input between about 100V and 240V and still convert it up to the desired voltage, it has the benefit of also fixing the PF in the process, so while in most applications having Active PF Correction would not necessarily mean a full range input, the way its implemented in a computer PSU gives it a full range input as a side benefit, all PSUs with active PFC have full range inputs with no additional circuitry required.
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a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2011 5:56:51 PM

hunter315 said:
Im a fourth year electrical engineering major, i am quite familiar with power factor and PF correction,

and im not trying to say that the PF itself is why there is full range input.

This is what I'm trying to say.....

Allow me to explain better, its not the PF correction itself that provides the full range input, its the way its implemented using a boost converter. The controller of the converter senses the input voltage and adjusts the converter to provide a constant output voltage, the boost converter is selected so it can take an input between about 100V and 240V and still convert it up to the desired voltage, it has the benefit of also fixing the PF in the process, so while in most applications having

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"Active PF Correction would not necessarily mean a full range input,"

You just repeated the point that is not the APFC that makes the input unit compatible to different electrical standards.....

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the way its implemented in a computer PSU gives it a full range input as a side benefit, all PSUs with active PFC have full range inputs with no additional circuitry required.



The proper check for voltage compatibility is to check the

Input Voltage Rating....(i.e. 100V to 240V AC)

Input Freq Rating (i.e. 47HZ to 63HZ)....

You can't refer the AFC as the reference for compliance for EU or US electrical standard. That is flat out wrong.

Any electrical equipment can be compatible w/ EU or US electrical standard and can have or not have PAFC. You know that.


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June 1, 2011 6:23:12 PM

OK damn that was a hell of a Reply. It was a false alarm though. The PS does work. The mobo must have got jostled in the plane ride over. I reseated all the parts in the case. The mother board must not have been grounded properly. Its singing now. I will update the thread if something else happens. Thanks for all the information. I hope it helps someone else in the future. Peace in the middle east!
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a b ) Power supply
June 1, 2011 8:11:38 PM

midarkmind said:
OK damn that was a hell of a Reply. It was a false alarm though. The PS does work. The mobo must have got jostled in the plane ride over. I reseated all the parts in the case. The mother board must not have been grounded properly. Its singing now. I will update the thread if something else happens. Thanks for all the information. I hope it helps someone else in the future. Peace in the middle east!



Great! Congratulations
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June 8, 2011 12:13:36 AM

Best answer selected by midarkmind.
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a b ) Power supply
June 8, 2011 6:42:22 AM

This topic has been closed by Maziar
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