Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Building new PC.

Last response: in Systems
Share
February 28, 2011 3:55:33 PM

Hey guys! I just bought components for a new computer, and I dont know how hard its going to be be building it. Any one have some tips or guides? Here is a list of the components:

Case: Antec LanBoy Air Midi Tower
Motherboard: ASUS SABERTOOTH X58, Socket-1366
Processor: Intel Core™ i7 Quad Processor i7-960
RAM: Corsair Dominator DHX DDR3 1600MHz 12GB
Graphiccard: XFX Radeon HD 6950 2GB GDDR5
Powersupply: Corsair HX 850W PSU
Harddrive: Crucial RealSSD C300 2,5" 128GB
DVD burner: Sony Optiarc DVD±RW burner AD-7263S
Thanks!

More about : building

February 28, 2011 5:18:30 PM

Here's what I do:
1. Put the RAM and CPU in them motherboard.
2. Set the HDD, OD, and PSU in the Case.
3. Add the motherboard bundle into the case and then set the graphics board.

If you live in West Yorkshire, although I doubt it. I could build the system for you if your confidence is depleted.
February 28, 2011 5:23:51 PM

There's a guide through the stickies at the top of the forum. As for how easy it will be to build, it should be extremely simple. There really is no wrong way to put it together, assuming you don't break out a hammer.

I will also say it's a shame you didn't come here before you bought parts though. You'd have saved money and gotten a better deal with the advice that you should've waited until Sandy Bridge motherboards were re-released. The i5-2500K is more powerful than the old i7 CPUs, and it's only $230, with the best boards being under $200 and using dual channel RAM. Or you could have splurged and gotten the i7-2600K ($330) and gotten performance like the i7-980X. You could have easily gotten 20-50% more performance at stock speeds and saved up to $200 (16 GB of RAM vs. 12 GB) You would have also saved a ton by not buying the massively overpriced Dominator series of sticks and not buying 12 GB worth. But that's too bad...
Related resources
February 28, 2011 7:27:49 PM

Thanks for the help! :) 
February 28, 2011 8:25:15 PM

MadAdmiral said:
There's a guide through the stickies at the top of the forum. As for how easy it will be to build, it should be extremely simple. There really is no wrong way to put it together, assuming you don't break out a hammer.

I will also say it's a shame you didn't come here before you bought parts though. You'd have saved money and gotten a better deal with the advice that you should've waited until Sandy Bridge motherboards were re-released. The i5-2500K is more powerful than the old i7 CPUs, and it's only $230, with the best boards being under $200 and using dual channel RAM. Or you could have splurged and gotten the i7-2600K ($330) and gotten performance like the i7-980X. You could have easily gotten 20-50% more performance at stock speeds and saved up to $200 (16 GB of RAM vs. 12 GB) You would have also saved a ton by not buying the massively overpriced Dominator series of sticks and not buying 12 GB worth. But that's too bad...


I can cancel the order and replace them, if you think i should buy different components. If you culd make a list over components that you recomend more that wuld be great!
February 28, 2011 9:25:06 PM

Depends on budget and what exactly you're doing with it, but if you can wait a few weeks, it would be worth it to return them and wait. The reason you'll need to wait is that there was an issue with the SATA II ports on the motherboards, so Intel had to recall the boards. The problem isn't actually that big, as it only affects about 5% of boards and takes several years to show up (it's only been demonstrated in Intel's labs), the main issue is that you can't buy LGA1155 boards anywhere.

The revision has supposedly been released to manufacturers, and supposedly some of them have started shipping revised units, but I haven't seen them available anywhere yet. The re-release date was supposed to be near the end of March or in early April.

If it costs a significant amount of money to cancel/return or you can't wait to buy, then don't bother returning the parts.

Judging what your budget is from what you've picked out, here's what I'd look at:

CPU: i7-2600K $330. If you're not doing any encoding, rendering or such, you could probably drop that down to the i5-2500K ($230)
Mobo: ASRock P67 Extreme4 $150ish or Asus P8P67 Pro $190ish
RAM: G.Skill Sniper 2x4 GB 1600 mhz CAS Latency 9 $100. I don't think you'll need more than this, but you could get two kits of it.
HDD: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1 TB $65, assuming you need some storage (might be less on Amazon)
GPU: Same, unless you really feel like stepping up to a GTX 580, since you might be able to afford it...
PSU: Same
SSD: Same
Case: Same
Optical: Same
February 28, 2011 11:48:45 PM

While I'd also go with a 2500k (or 2600k if you feel you have too much money left over) build, I'd stick w/ the same quality components.

MoBo - The Asus P67 Sabertooth TUF is an outstanding board.
http://www.guru3d.com/article/asus-sabertooth-p67-tuf-r...

GFX - The 6970 edges out the 570 by 526 fps to 524 fps in Guru3D's testing as a single card and both are quite happy with an 850 watt PSU and OC'd 2500k/2600k. If ya thinking of pairing them up, twin 570's edged out the twin 6970's 873 to 825 fps.

RAM - Two ends of the spectrum

CAS 9 ($100) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
CAS 6 ($155) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Storage - The C300 is a great drive, but 128 GB won't last you long. Add a HD

If ya compare, you'll notice that there is no "best drive", each does better in certain areas:

http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2009-3.5-desktop-har...[2371]=on&prod[3016]=on&prod[2365]=on

Seagate 7200.12* ($65) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Spinpoint F3 ($65) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
WD Black ($89) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

* Current "Shellshocker Combo"

If ya thinking of overclocking, consider a Scythe SCMG 2100 w. Shin Etsu TIM

Cooler - $40 - Scythe SCMG 2100 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
TIM - $6 - Shin Etsu http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
March 1, 2011 12:21:51 AM

I can't get behind a $250 motherboard when there are two great quality and feature rich choices at $190 (the Asus P8P67 Pro) and $150 (the ASRock P67 Extreme4). The value of the lower priced boards is phenomenal. What's that extra $60-100 get you? USB III headers, which most cases don't support, and a plastic shell for the motherboard, which doesn't seem to serve any purpose other than looks. Not worth $100 in my opinion.

I don't even consider the WD Black an option. It's not significantly faster than either the 7200.12 or F3, yet it's nearly 50% more expensive. I wouldn't waste my money on it. As for the 7200.12, it has it's strong points, but Seagate's got a lot of ground to make up after the absolute horrible showing of their 7200.11s. I should also point out that the F3 is around $60 on Amazon right now, and I've seen it as low as $55. The 7200.12's combos on Newegg aren't any good. They're all paired with NAS or other servers, with software or with a lot of old tech. Basically, they all pair a 7200.12 (or several) with stuff that isn't any use to the OP.

I also don't really see the value in aftermarket thermal paste. Sure, it's not that expensive, but the stuff that comes with the aftermarket coolers isn't bad. If it was, the cooler companies would be concerned that it reflects badly on their product. Unless you're trying to break some kind of record, you can leave the thermal paste out.

The HD 6970 (which the 6950 2 GB can be turned into) does beat the GTX 570. However, it doesn't beat the GTX 580. I doubt that it will fit into the budget, but it's worth taking a look. Still, the 6950 2 GB is powerful enough (even without the BIOS flash to make it a 6970) that it's probably not worth it to return it.
March 1, 2011 3:20:31 PM

What do you think about this list?

Case: Antec LanBoy Air Midi Tower Blue
PSU: Corsair HX 850W PSU
HDD: Crucial RealSSD C300 2,5" 128GB AND Western Digital My Book® 3.0 1TB
Graphic: MSI GeForce GTX 580 1536MB PhysX
MOBO: ASUS Sabertooth P67, Socket-1155
Optical: Samsung DVD±RW burner, SH-S223C
RAM: Corsair Dominator DDR3 1600MHz 12GB CL8
Processor: Intel Core™ i7 Quad Processor i7-2600K
March 1, 2011 5:10:45 PM

That would be good, but you wouldn't be able to use all of the 12 GB of RAM. You'd likely be using 8 GB (either 2x4 GB or 4x2 GB). If it's a 4 GB stick, you could try to find the exact same RAM as a single stick and fill all four slots and have 16 GB total.

I still don't think the Sabertooth P67 is a good value, but it isn't a bad board.

I still think it'd be good to throw in a cheap internal HDD. You don't want to be constantly writing and copying from the SSD as it decreases it's useful life. If you do leave the external drive plugged in and running all the time, you'll see considerably lower speeds when you try to write data directly to it as well. You probably don't need a 1 TB one, but the 500 GB 7200.12 or F3 (or even the Samsung Spinpoint F4 320 GB) would be a good idea. They're all around $50.
March 1, 2011 7:09:04 PM

MadAdmiral said:
That would be good, but you wouldn't be able to use all of the 12 GB of RAM. You'd likely be using 8 GB (either 2x4 GB or 4x2 GB). If it's a 4 GB stick, you could try to find the exact same RAM as a single stick and fill all four slots and have 16 GB total.

I still don't think the Sabertooth P67 is a good value, but it isn't a bad board.

I still think it'd be good to throw in a cheap internal HDD. You don't want to be constantly writing and copying from the SSD as it decreases it's useful life. If you do leave the external drive plugged in and running all the time, you'll see considerably lower speeds when you try to write data directly to it as well. You probably don't need a 1 TB one, but the 500 GB 7200.12 or F3 (or even the Samsung Spinpoint F4 320 GB) would be a good idea. They're all around $50.


Would you recommend buying Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD7, Socket-1155 instead then?
Okay, I`m buying the cheap Samsung SpinPoint F3 1TB.
And by the way thanks alot for all the help! :) 
March 1, 2011 7:27:28 PM

Considering that the UD7 has a MSRP of $330, I wouldn't recommend it either. That's even more insane than the $250 Asus wants for the Sabertooth.

The two boards I like best are the Asus P8P67 Pro and ASRock P67 Extreme4. They're reasonably priced, and have all the useful features (2 PCIe 2.0 slots at 8x/8x, USB 3/SATA III support, etc.). It's likely that you won't be able to find them for sale any where for a little bit, but I'm fairly certain Asus and ASRock are keeping the same model numbers and just changing the stepping for the revision.
March 1, 2011 8:26:27 PM

The problem about the two motherboards you suggested is that i need to buy mine ASAP. So if i buy Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD7, Socket-1155 will that fit with MSI GeForce GTX 560Ti 1GB PhysX? it says 4xPCIe(2.0)x16. I dont know what x16 means. Will be as i bought PCI 2.0? no difference?
March 1, 2011 9:03:11 PM

Then I would go with the cheapest quality board you can find.

It will certainly work the with 560. The x16 means is the speed of the slot. Normal speed is 16x (or x16), but most boards don't support 16x/16x when you add the second card, and there are virtually no boards that keep full speed with more than two cards. Most boards run at 8x/8x with two cards, which is fine, as the performance difference between 16x/16x and 8x/8x is only 3-4% and only noticeable when you're using the HD 5970 (which is a lot more powerful than all the other cards). Of course, having more than two PCIe 2.0 slots isn't that useful either, as Crossfire and SLI doesn't scale well past the second card. The added performance (usually only 20-40%) isn't worth the large cost of a high end card.
!