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What is the s/pdif in & out cable & how it work for digital surround out

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May 30, 2011 2:32:44 PM

hello,
I AM HRISHI & I HAVE GYGABYTE MOTHER BORD & HAVE S/PDIF OUT PUR BUT THERE IS
A PROBLEM RELATED TO S/PDIF CABLE. I DONT KNOW THIS KIND OF CABLE . HOW IT
WORKS & HOW TO PLUGE IT. BUT IT CONVER ORDINARY SOUND IN TO DOLBY DIGITAL
HOW. HELP ME & WHERE TO PURCHES IT & HOW TO PLUGE IT
TELL ME
a b à CPUs
May 30, 2011 3:52:12 PM

S/PDIF is normally for surround sound systems (I believe) as you only need one cable that goes to an amp or sub-woofer, and then that in turn splits the sound up to your 5 or 7 speakers.

If you're just looking to have normal PC speakers, instead of using the S/PDIF port, you should just be using the standard 3.5mm port at the bottom of your motherboard.
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a b à CPUs
May 30, 2011 6:05:26 PM

S/PDIF out is a connection you can use to run to a surround sound receiver. You use a TOSLINK cable for the connection:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TOSLINK

You can buy one of these cables at any larger department store selling electronics. I like to buy any of my audio/video cables from this site:

http://www.parts-express.com/

They have great quality cables at low prices. If you use this connection and a TOSLINK cable, you will need an external surround receiver and speakers plugged into the receiver. This is for first-class high-end audio setups on a PC.

Most people will only use the 3.5mm (color-coded) audio jacks for surround basic stereo sound functionality.

In most cases, you'll never use the S/PDIF in on a PC unless you're recording audio from a surround sound source.
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a b à CPUs
May 31, 2011 12:06:44 PM

SPDIF can carry ONLY three formats:

1: 2.0/2.1 Uncompressed PCM
2: 5.1 Dolby Digital/6.1 Dolby Digital EX
3: 5.1 DTS

You can NOT get surround audio using SPDIF unless the audio you are trying to output is encoded in either Dolby or DTS formats. For most PC audio, audio is NOT in Dolby/DTS format, so you need a realtime encoder, which are typically found in dedicated soundcards.

SPDIF supports two output cables: The older Coax [often found on Home Theatre equipment], and the newer optical standard. Both carry the same audio signals, and most devices now use optical instead of coax.
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a b à CPUs
February 3, 2012 6:25:19 PM

Best answer selected by mousemonkey.
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a b à CPUs
February 3, 2012 6:25:21 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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