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CPU woes and confusion

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  • CPUs
Last response: in CPUs
May 31, 2011 12:12:04 AM

What started this all off was a screw up on my part. It's been years since I really did any computer building. The last time I bought a computer, I was low on funds and purchased an out of a box special HP PC from Newegg. I recently decided I'd like to upgrade the cpu, and bought a Phenom II 970BE. The fun starts here. I'm sure you can see where this is going.
I have a Phenom in the machine, but it's a low power 910. The only info I could find on the mobo said that it could take the 9xx series Phenoms. Only after I had it installed did I begin to wonder if the mobo supported it. I know the mobo sucks. I fully understand that.
I started running hardware checking software and began to get concerned. The temps were high, but not out of limits. It was at around 40 at idle, going up to just below 60 under load. I played with oc'ing a little, just to see. The idle went up some, but the high end still stayed around high 50's. It went to 60 once, I believe. I felt this was higher than it should be, and I started to hunt around for what temps others were getting with stock cooling. Every post I found was running lower than mine. I thought to try undervolting and/or undreclocking and that is when the weird ramped up.
According to CPU-Z, I was running at a vcore of 2.16. I hadn't really noticed that number at first, but when I actually noticed, I felt that it must be a wrong reading. I ran Speedfan and Everest to verify. All give the same reading. I tried undervolting. Dropping the voltage made no change at all to the reading. I could crash the system if I dropped it enough, however. I finally got scared enough to pull the cpu and put the 910 back in.
Upon reinstalling the 910, I realized that a couple of pins had bent when I removed the cpu the first time. (It was glued to the heat sink with the crappy pad they had on there) Got that all straightened and the system back up. Ran the readings again, which I had never bothered to do with the old cpu. The temps are the same on it. The voltage shows to be the same.
So. What is going on here? Is there a faulty voltage sensor? Why the heck am I running so hot? Can I run the bigger chip? Am I amazingly lucky the whole thing didn't burst into flames? I'm thinking my best bet is to just buy a micro-ATX board that I know supports 125 watts. It would be a much better board anyway. If I do, I'll buy an aftermarket cooler as well. May as well use the 970 more as it's meant to be used.

Details would be good here: The current mobo is a crappy HP Foxconn board. HP calls it aloe 1.01. The old chip is a Phenom II x4 910 standard edition. The new chip is a Phenom II x4 970 BE. All with stock cooling right now. When I put the 910 back, I used the 970's heatsink/fan on it. It is a much heavier block with heat pipes. I used AS5 each time. I realize it does take a while to get the full effect from the AR5. I replaced the PSU with a 600 watt Rosewill prior to changing cpus. Any help/advice would be great. I suspect strongly to hear that the mobo sucks and needs replaced. I am well aware, but tell me anyway. The more times I'm told, the quicker I am to get around to doing it ;) 

More about : cpu woes confusion

May 31, 2011 5:57:24 AM

I would suggest getting a solid board (and possibly new ram if needed) along with aftermarket cooling.

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a c 217 à CPUs
May 31, 2011 4:53:58 PM

Use your finger ... seriously :lol: 

OEM BIOSs are notorious for not playing well with third-party utilities. If you don't pull back a fried, smoking nub-of-a-digit I think you should be okay. How were you able to OC? Not sure if I'd worry about it at 3.5GHz if you feel like you have issues with temps --- and a nice 3rd party HSF will certainly help with that if it fits in your case.

I would only replace the motherboard (with a similar chipset) if you have an OEM OS DVD available as a 'back-up' plan. If you do indeed have to format and re-install the OS, you will not be violating the terms of the EULA by using a similar chipset motherboard as a replacement, and may use the key on your case.
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May 31, 2011 6:58:29 PM

Wisecracker said:
Use your finger ... seriously :lol: 

OEM BIOSs are notorious for not playing well with third-party utilities. If you don't pull back a fried, smoking nub-of-a-digit I think you should be okay. How were you able to OC? Not sure if I'd worry about it at 3.5GHz if you feel like you have issues with temps --- and a nice 3rd party HSF will certainly help with that if it fits in your case.

I would only replace the motherboard (with a similar chipset) if you have an OEM OS DVD available as a 'back-up' plan. If you do indeed have to format and re-install the OS, you will not be violating the terms of the EULA by using a similar chipset motherboard as a replacement, and may use the key on your case.



I actually tried the finger method. The CPU heatsink was hot, but no hotter than normal. There is another heatsink close to the CPU that was hot enough to not be able to leave a finger on for long. I'm kind of guessing it's for mosfets, but I really don't know.

I can OC it with PhenomMSRTweaker. It took some playing, but it did work. A bit of a surprise, actually. I think this cruddy board may have more settings that are hidden by the OEM bios. No way to find a new bios that I have found, as the manufacturer offers no support for OEM products.

I have some room around the CPU that I may could fit a better cooler. It is a bit cramped, like most microATX boards. You think running the 970 on this board would be safe? When I had it on, I seemed to have less performance, at least while playing my game. That is the opposite as I expected, as the main game I play is very cpu dependent. I figured something must be wrong in that case.

As to the OS issue; I only have the disks for this system. In the past, I have had little trouble swapping mobos and using the original software. I don't doubt that it is in violation of the EULA though. I suppose I ought to actually read those sometime.
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a c 217 à CPUs
May 31, 2011 11:33:25 PM

That's odd. Since the 970BE is essentially 25% faster you should see some improvement. That may be a sign of an underlying issue.

If you have the OEM OS disks you should be okay. I've run into problems using the self-burned 'recovery disks' that are supposed to be a replacement for them.

Good to know MSRTweaker can massage clock speed on an OEM system. I'll definitely give it a try next time I have the opportunity.
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