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GTX 570 seems to be running hot

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December 30, 2010 3:51:40 AM

EVGA GTX 570, running Folding@home it averages 85C. Is this normal? I understand that FAH is probably a bit more rigorous that gaming, but I worry because my room gets very hot during the summer. What is the max temp for this thing?

Thanks!

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a c 194 U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
December 30, 2010 3:54:22 AM

Thats fine, the max temp is around 100C, so thats a little hot, but nothing to worry about yet. GTX 470s and 480s hit 90-100C with their stock cooling safely, i imagine 570s are similar.
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a b U Graphics card
December 30, 2010 7:03:28 AM

Those temps are nothing to worry about.Different users will report different temperatures because airflow is different for different users.
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December 30, 2010 5:06:37 PM

SGT,

I ran X2 570 SCs in a midtower, only to find out I had not enough airflow. Mine ran in the 90C+ range all the time.

I purchased a bigger case (HAF-X) that had fans designed to cool the videocards, which helped a ton. however I was not completely satisfied with the numbers, because I was used to the previous 200 series temps.

So i purchased the high-flow brackets from evga to help get the heat out quicker, and believe me it did. Now with the fans on auto, even running 3dmark11 at extreme settings, they never break 65C. They idle about 30/34c when not gaming.

My bottom line to this story is that I had the same problems. Which were solved by using a case that allowed for better cooling and I use the high-flow brackets that helped way more than I thought they would.

If you do have a big case, then check your airflow. Make sure that you have more air in than out, and that you have some kind of direct air getting to your 570.

Also consider the brackets, they work awesome.
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December 30, 2010 5:10:59 PM

85 is a lill high..make sure that your PC is well ventilated
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a c 172 U Graphics card
December 30, 2010 5:16:38 PM

You didn't mention the fanspeed, one thing about these cards is that you will often have to live with the noise. Set the fan speed to 60-80% range and see how your temps are but if it already that high then you have either a hot room/climate or poor airflow in the case.
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December 30, 2010 5:17:50 PM

wickedsnow said:
SGT,

I ran X2 570 SCs in a midtower, only to find out I had not enough airflow. Mine ran in the 90C+ range all the time.

I purchased a bigger case (HAF-X) that had fans designed to cool the videocards, which helped a ton. however I was not completely satisfied with the numbers, because I was used to the previous 200 series temps.

So i purchased the high-flow brackets from evga to help get the heat out quicker, and believe me it did. Now with the fans on auto, even running 3dmark11 at extreme settings, they never break 65C. They idle about 30/34c when not gaming.

My bottom line to this story is that I had the same problems. Which were solved by using a case that allowed for better cooling and I use the high-flow brackets that helped way more than I thought they would.

If you do have a big case, then check your airflow. Make sure that you have more air in than out, and that you have some kind of direct air getting to your 570.

Also consider the brackets, they work awesome.



This is my case, though I have a deticated 650 Watt PSU. At the moment, changing out the case is not an option. I replaced both of the 120mm fans in the case with Antec Excalibur Fans (which allegedly have higher airflow than stock) to improve air circulation.

Are these the brackets you're referring to? How much of a difference do they make? Why on earth don't they just use these to begin with?
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Best solution

December 30, 2010 7:49:51 PM

SGT,

Yes those are the brackets I'm using. And why didn't they use them as a standard? You got me on that one. It's a (duh) in my opinion.

However, EVGA did and has offered a highflow/backplate options for the 470/480 before. Considering they just released the 570's, give them some time to offer one.

It's the best $10 I ever spent on a videocard. They make a huge difference in my opinion. I saw my temps drop between 5-8C on average.

You case does not seem to have the best cooling options.... If you look at the side of your door, you have a fan slot with a plastic port to direct air. The only problem is, it's directed at your cpu and not your graphics cards. Just below it is a regular vent. Try putting a fan in it, either an 80-90mm or 120mm. That should blow directly over your 570 and reduce the temps further.

in the front of your case, I would suggest that you move all your hard drives to the bottom 2 bays. This will let your front fan be un-restricted in providing airflow to your videocard. You don't want your HDD's blocking your front airflow.

If your do the fan adjustments that i'm suggesting, and you get the brackets, you should see a realistic difference of 10C or greater. The reality is that you have a midtower with bad airflow design while running a very hot card. We can only make the best of it if you can't change cases.

The last thing you can do is to increase the fanspeed of the cards. In my experiances so far, leaving them at stock bios controlled auto, they almost never go past 55% fan speed even with furmark and 3dmark11. That's because nvidia has deemed normal operating tempuratures to be between 70-85C.

If my other suggestions don't give you the results that you are looking for, then I suggest that you use the EVGA percision utility and setup a fan profile for the card on boot-up, and set it to either 60 or 65% fanspeed. It's been my experiance that anything past 65% is a bit loud, and the cooling difference is only marginal.

The best way to tell if your case is having an airflow problem is to let it run normally, check the temps. Then take off the side door of your case while running, and if the temps drop, you have an airflow problem.
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December 30, 2010 8:33:04 PM

wickedsnow said:
SGT,

Yes those are the brackets I'm using. And why didn't they use them as a standard? You got me on that one. It's a (duh) in my opinion.

However, EVGA did and has offered a highflow/backplate options for the 470/480 before. Considering they just released the 570's, give them some time to offer one.

It's the best $10 I ever spent on a videocard. They make a huge difference in my opinion. I saw my temps drop between 5-8C on average.

You case does not seem to have the best cooling options.... If you look at the side of your door, you have a fan slot with a plastic port to direct air. The only problem is, it's directed at your cpu and not your graphics cards. Just below it is a regular vent. Try putting a fan in it, either an 80-90mm or 120mm. That should blow directly over your 570 and reduce the temps further.

in the front of your case, I would suggest that you move all your hard drives to the bottom 2 bays. This will let your front fan be un-restricted in providing airflow to your videocard. You don't want your HDD's blocking your front airflow.

If your do the fan adjustments that i'm suggesting, and you get the brackets, you should see a realistic difference of 10C or greater. The reality is that you have a midtower with bad airflow design while running a very hot card. We can only make the best of it if you can't change cases.

The last thing you can do is to increase the fanspeed of the cards. In my experiances so far, leaving them at stock bios controlled auto, they almost never go past 55% fan speed even with furmark and 3dmark11. That's because nvidia has deemed normal operating tempuratures to be between 70-85C.

If my other suggestions don't give you the results that you are looking for, then I suggest that you use the EVGA percision utility and setup a fan profile for the card on boot-up, and set it to either 60 or 65% fanspeed. It's been my experiance that anything past 65% is a bit loud, and the cooling difference is only marginal.

The best way to tell if your case is having an airflow problem is to let it run normally, check the temps. Then take off the side door of your case while running, and if the temps drop, you have an airflow problem.


I just realized that I forgot to mention that it's a GTX 570 SC. Not sure how much of a difference that makes. I'm also aware that my case probably isn't the last word in cooling, but I wanted something that was subtle. From what I've seen, subtle and good cooling seem to be at odds with one another in the world of computer case design.

I do have the guide cone removed since I have a Cooler Master Hyper 212+, which prevents installation of a fan on the upper vent (otherwise I would have put on there). I'll take the side panel off when I get home to see what it does. I have a new high flow bracket on order as well.

Do you know how much difference those back plates make? They don't have one for the 570 yet, but it's probably only a matter of time.

Finally, the only thing I find odd is that before this I had a GTX460 OC'd to about 790 MHz, and it ran at about 69C at the MOST, which seems consistent with temps other people have reported for the same card. Weird. Thanks for your input thus far!
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December 30, 2010 10:32:26 PM

SGT,

The 460 uses the GF104 chip which has many features disabled. It's not just speed that produce heat, it's features, pipelines, wattage used, voltage, etc etc.

The 470/480 bracket is the same for the 500 series also. I also run 570 SCs, (2 in sli)

Be careful not to overtighten the new brackets. you can strip them easy.

One you take your side door off, run furmark or 3dmark11 or vantage. In some way, stress out your gpu. Make sure you are running gpu-z or evga's utility to monitor temps.

Do me a favor. If you have any extra fans laying around 80mm or bigger, plug them in and just hold one with your hand near the fan of your 570, aiming the air towards it. you should see a 5-10C drop just off that. That is just a small test as to how much of a difference direct air has for cooling. It helps justify your front fan being un-restricted by the HDD's.

Make sure you run the fan while monitoring temps. You can just watch your temps go down!
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December 31, 2010 1:52:21 PM

wickedsnow said:
SGT,

The 460 uses the GF104 chip which has many features disabled. It's not just speed that produce heat, it's features, pipelines, wattage used, voltage, etc etc.

The 470/480 bracket is the same for the 500 series also. I also run 570 SCs, (2 in sli)

Be careful not to overtighten the new brackets. you can strip them easy.

One you take your side door off, run furmark or 3dmark11 or vantage. In some way, stress out your gpu. Make sure you are running gpu-z or evga's utility to monitor temps.

Do me a favor. If you have any extra fans laying around 80mm or bigger, plug them in and just hold one with your hand near the fan of your 570, aiming the air towards it. you should see a 5-10C drop just off that. That is just a small test as to how much of a difference direct air has for cooling. It helps justify your front fan being un-restricted by the HDD's.

Make sure you run the fan while monitoring temps. You can just watch your temps go down!


With the side door off the GPU runs at around 82~83C with a fan speed of about 59%. With everything closed up it's at 85C and 63% fan. I'm not sure how I'd mount a fan to that side panel... I'll keep thinking on that. As far as stressing it goes, my system has been running nothing but Folding@home 6800 projects, which from what I've read, are particularly brutal.

In the meantime, I just bought one of these, I plan to use it to mount an additional 120mm fan to the front where I have 3 empty 5.25" bays (might as well make some use of the space eh?). Hopefully that additional air flow into the case will help take some of the duty off of the lower fan. I'll let you know how it turns out.

Are you on the EVGA forums too?
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a c 172 U Graphics card
December 31, 2010 3:34:12 PM

Well lets try to improve things even if you got your hands dirty, replace the stock compound with arctic silver 5 or any thing better and this will help knock the temps back but it wont be much but every degree counts when folding. Next try to mount or place a fan near the rear of the card and this will help create a area of high pressure near the card which will help to force more air through the cooler but don't expect wonders unless you were to decide to go water.
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December 31, 2010 4:37:35 PM

SGT,

You can see that having that side door off is helping, as it has lower fan speeds and lower temp vs with it on.

Have you tried yet just holding a fan near the rear of the card (where the intake fan is) like I suggested and checked temps? Any way that you can get direct airflow will help a ton. You will see a bigger difference once you get the bracket.

Nforce4max's suggestion about replacing the thermal compound with something better is a great idea if all else fails. However, some people do it anyways just for temps whether or not it's a problem.

Yes I am on the EVGA forums, I'm just never on it much.


Have you tried moving your hdd's to the lower 2 slots yet?
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December 31, 2010 5:30:58 PM

wickedsnow said:
SGT,

You can see that having that side door off is helping, as it has lower fan speeds and lower temp vs with it on.

Have you tried yet just holding a fan near the rear of the card (where the intake fan is) like I suggested and checked temps? Any way that you can get direct airflow will help a ton. You will see a bigger difference once you get the bracket.

Nforce4max's suggestion about replacing the thermal compound with something better is a great idea if all else fails. However, some people do it anyways just for temps whether or not it's a problem.

Yes I am on the EVGA forums, I'm just never on it much.


Have you tried moving your hdd's to the lower 2 slots yet?


The upper drive isn't actually in the way of air flow, however the 2nd drive down was. I moved it to the 2nd to the bottom slot and it didn't really help and to speak of. I can't move it to the bottom yet since the angled SATA connector gets in the way, but I'll probably try that when I switch out the bracket.

As far as replacing the thermal compound... I'm not really keen on performing surgery on a graphics card. I might get adventurous one day and do it, but not today. I still have some Arctic Silver 5 sitting around if I do decide to do it. Does switching the thermal compound really do that much for these?

As another update, I did try holding a fan right on the card, it didn't seem to really do much, maybe a 2C difference. I'm also not sure if adding a front fan will do anything either. I'm starting to wish I had just bought another GTX 460 and put them in SLI (2 x 460's are faster than a 570 right?)
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December 31, 2010 8:29:10 PM

2x460 1GB verions are faster, but not 100% of the time. Also, if your playing a game without sli support, the 570 is faster.

It might be tough to see the benifits of a front fan and side fan like i'm suggesting right away. But believe me, I run 2 of them in sli and did so in a very small midtower like yours before I got the HAF-X. I had temps past 90C all the time. I completely understand your pain.

I promise you with what little reputation I do have that a front fan and a side fan will help, even if only by 2-4C. Every little thing you change to make the temps lower will add up to a big result.

Yes, changing thermal compund does make a difference. The main reason behind this is that 99% of all manufactures use sub-par thermal paste. By using the (good stuff), you can see benifits of 2-10C depending on what you applying it to. (cpu, northbridge, videocard, etc etc.)

Folding damn near maxes out your gpu. (something no game will do at this current time.) My point with this is that your looking at temps with a workload on your card close to 100%. For gaming, with the door off, if your only hitting 82C while folding, then gaming should be no sweat.

Having a front fan and side fan will be even better than with the door off, your 82C should drop to at least 76-78C. Once you add the bracket, you should see maybe 70-74C max while folding with the door closed. And remember, gaming uses way less gpu power than folding or furmark.

You can set your fan profile to 65% fan speed. Doing this will help alot considering your restricted airflow, and will not be too loud. Yes you can set it higher, but the noise goes up fast too.

Your upper hdd is in the way of airflow with a front fan, I promise this. I looked at your case that you linked and zoomed in. You want the air from the front fan to go through your HDD bays and directly into the intake of your videocard. If you had a front fan and put your finger near the intake of your videocard, I bet you won't feel much air. But if you moved the top HDD down 2 spaces to the third slot, I bet you will now feel some air.

Think of air this way,.....

It's a hot summer day and you have been jogging for 30 minutes. There's no wind at all, the air is stagnant. You are going to feel much much hotter than if say, a small breeze came by. Hot air or not, you would feel much cooler even from a hot breeze than from stagnant air.

The same concept is true for computer parts. Put a front fan and side fan in the case. Then move your HDD's down a few slots (both of them.)

I have personally done everything to my own case that i'm suggesting to you, and saw big temp differences. but ultimately, the biggest change in temps was a bigger case that had better airflow and fan slots designed to blow directly on the videocards.

I know you don't like this route, but once you have tried everything else, if your not satisfied, then consider a new case....

Just remember that I run 2X570 SCs myself, and thus my upper card got much hotter than my bottom card. Considering that you only run 1 card, you should have even better temps than me.

Question, did you upgrade your 460 to a 570? Because if you have it laying around, use it as a dedicated physics card.
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January 10, 2011 12:57:30 AM

Best answer selected by sgt bombulous.
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January 10, 2011 1:02:15 AM

Wickedsnow,

Thank you for the help. I've installed the bracket and found a phenominal drop in temps, about 4 degrees to 80C., and 57% on the fan, which is inaudible over the rest of the system. I also bought a bracker and installed an additional 120mm fan in the spot where 3 empty CD bays were. This helped a tiny bit on the GPU temps, but helped enormously on the CPU temp.

I did attempt to replace the thermal compound as well, but after removing the shroud, and the 4 screws for the GPU heatsink, it wouldn't budge. I didn't want to push the issue so I figured I'd just do it another time. Anything I missed perhaps?

Thanks again!
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January 11, 2011 10:42:09 PM

I just mounted pair of GTX 570 onto Rampage II Extreme and notized upper card runs way too hot, 69 C (lower card 40 C). That's idle temp. There's only 3 mm gap between the cards. Cant use lower pcie bank because i have PSU on the bottom of the casing (HAF932) and water cooling parts on upper part of the casing. Seems I have to spend few hundred bucks to get water cooling for at least upper card:/ Way to go Asus:D 
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