Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Damp hands while building PC

Last response: in Components
Share
June 4, 2011 7:27:53 PM

I just finished building a PC today. During the build, I washed & dried my hands several times to make sure that they were very clean. However, I noticed while assembling that I may have had a few droplets of water on my upper arms during the build.

I was wondering: what would happen if some of these droplets fell into the PC during the build? I looked on the motherboard and didn't see any, but who knows? I have not turned on the PC yet.

Should I wait some time to let it dry out before turning it on? If so how long?

More about : damp hands building

a b V Motherboard
June 4, 2011 7:32:03 PM

Take a hairdryer to your PC for several minutes. Let it cool for a few minutes.

Then turn it on and watch the sparks fly. Have some popcorn ready 'cause it should be a nice show.

Seriously, it should be fine after drying it out if there's only a few drops of water at most.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
June 4, 2011 8:22:58 PM

^Hope you realize they're joking.
Yea, no issues.
m
0
l
Related resources
June 4, 2011 8:30:47 PM

Most parts of a computer can be completely submerged in water and come out completely fine (once 100% dry), as long as no electricity runs through them while wet.

Just don't turn it on til it's dry and you'll be ok.
m
0
l

Best solution

June 4, 2011 8:50:20 PM

Hehe, jaguarskx has a very dark sense of humor, I see... :p 

As already stated, no harm should come to any components if it was like a small drop or two, especially if the PSU was not connected to external power at any time (now THAT might be a serious problem, but that's another discussion altogether).

If any droplets were to fall on any components, they would most likely drip to the case when moving it around during the install (my cases usually end up laying on at least 3 out of 6 sides during a build), and dry up completely before the build was complete.

Now, one other thing: you don't actually *need* to wash your hands repeatedly during a build. Sure, you should start with clean, dry hands, and wash up right after removing dust (very common during upgrades), but the only really dust-sensitive parts of a build are the CPU (dust between the IHS, thermal paste and cooler is not great) and maybe both memory and expansion sockets.

Apart from that, just about any component comes packed in low-dirt environments and are designed to stand at least some common dust, so if you start with clean hands, you shouldn't need to wash them during a new build.

Static electricity, however, might be a bigger problem (and washing your hands may increase it), friction can lead to static buildups that can fry electronics. Never had such a problem myself, but I've gotten myself an ES-bracelet just to be safe: put it on, connect it to the PSU/case and off you go (though that's completetly OT for this discussion).

Cheers.

Miguel
Share
June 5, 2011 1:18:54 AM

Thanks everyone for the great replies. I had an ESD strap on during most of the build so hopefully I don't have any static zapped electronics. I don't actually see any evidence of water in the PC, so I'm wondering how long I should wait before powering it on?

Is leaving the case open overnight enough?
m
0
l
June 5, 2011 9:49:26 AM

As I said before, most water droplets should evaporate rather quickly.

If you finished yesterday, even if there were any, they should be gone by now. If you *need* to make sure, do a visual inspection, turn the PC on one side (to disloge any big "puddle" that might have formed, and blow-dry the components (not too hot, though, you don't want to warp anything...).

Also, I have read reports of "baked" components in the past (in short, people put stuff in the oven, at 40~50ºC max, for a few minutes) when dealing with disassembling rigs after non-air cooling was applied.

I really don't think "baking" should be an option, but you never know just how paranoid one wants to be... hehe

Let us know if sparkles flew or not when you turn the rig on, OK?

Good luck.

Miguel
m
0
l
June 5, 2011 12:57:26 PM

no probs at all.oh come one thres no prob at all..turn on your pc and watch youtube vids on aquarium pc(oil)they r cool..like everyone said,no problems and RELAXXXX.
m
0
l
June 5, 2011 10:11:12 PM

LOL at the oil PC reference. Interesting, no doubt, but a bit "off".

You know, oil usually doesn't conduct electricity. Water, on the other hand, does (unless is 100% pure of diluted minerals, which is NOT easy to do). So, putting your hardware in oil is "meh" in terms of danger, while even small amounts of water can cause havoc on a build...

In any case, as everyone else has already said, it is severely unlikely he'll have any problems when powering the rig up. Correction, water-related problems, since he might have a DOA piece of hardware.

Miguel
m
0
l
June 6, 2011 4:49:14 PM

Best answer selected by tempstar.
m
0
l
June 7, 2011 2:43:50 AM

__Miguel_ said:

Apart from that, just about any component comes packed in low-dirt environments and are designed to stand at least some common dust, so if you start with clean hands, you shouldn't need to wash them during a new build.

Static electricity, however, might be a bigger problem (and washing your hands may increase it), friction can lead to static buildups that can fry electronics. Never had such a problem myself, but I've gotten myself an ES-bracelet just to be safe: put it on, connect it to the PSU/case and off you go (though that's completetly OT for this discussion).

Cheers.

Miguel



No,
Washing your hands decrease static electricity, water is a conductor of electricity.

m
0
l
June 7, 2011 4:43:34 PM

ghnader hsmithot said:
No,
Washing your hands decrease static electricity, water is a conductor of electricity.

Hmm, never thought about it that way. Makes sense, though.

Thanks for the clarification!

Miguel
m
0
l
!