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16:10 3D Monitor

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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January 2, 2011 1:40:08 AM

There was a thread back in 2009 asking basically this question, but it's a new year and I though it might be worth asking again...

Is anyone aware of a 16:10 (preferably 1920x1200) monitor that is 120hz capable? I've looked at nvidia's list at http://www.nvidia.com/object/3d-vision-requirements.htm..., but I don't know if this is still up to date.

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January 2, 2011 7:41:34 AM

I believe due to bandwidth limitations the maximum resolution for 3D monitors is 1920 x 1080.
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January 25, 2011 12:56:49 PM

I think the real issue is yield on the panels at manufacturing. The industry is ALL seeming to be getting on the 1920*1080 bandwagon. I was told that it is an issue of being able to get more panels out of LCD glass when they cut them at 1920*1080 rather than at 1920*1200. The masses will mostly take whatever is offered to them at a cheaper price. I have 6 24" 1920*1200 LCD's and love them.(I am a financial trader) To find one nowadays will cost you a premium, they use to be very cost effective but the price has now gone up BIGTIME. They are now considered a specialty item. I bought mine 2-3 years ago they are SOYO/Honeywell, now Gone from the scene. They are 8bit panels not the TN 6 bit that we see now in the market. Best part is that I got them for about $200-250 each over a year period.

Some CRT monitors have greater than 120HZ and can apparently run Nvidia 3D at supposedly up to 2048*1536.

HDMI is suppose to be able to run at 10.2Gb/S. I think that is 1.3 spec the 1.4 is suppose to be a bit higher I think. The CRT's are using some DVI, but mostly VGA connectors.

It ma be more an issue of cost to manufacture than the bandwidth. If it were bandwidth that would mean we are locked into 1920*1080 for a long, long time. The truth is there are higher resolutions coming soon that will kick 1920 to the curb. It all has to do with what the economy can bear, not necessarily what technology can deliver.
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