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Best 4x2gb 1333mhz memory kit

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February 9, 2012 11:06:49 AM

need a high speed and highly reliable 1333mhz 4x2gb ram from corsair or kingston memory under 50$..
a c 146 } Memory
February 9, 2012 12:12:48 PM

4 vs 2

Just so u know, more sticks = more chance of the problem vs. 2 sticks : )
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February 9, 2012 1:50:19 PM

nikorr said:
4 vs 2

Just so u know, more sticks = more chance of the problem vs. 2 sticks : )

sorry i typed wrongly i need two 4gb 1333mhz ram
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a c 146 } Memory
February 9, 2012 1:53:59 PM

vishalaestro said:
sorry i typed wrongly i need two 4gb 1333mhz ram

OK, what about this one?

SUPPORT FOR INTEL XMP
Intel Extreme Memory profiles (XMP) technology provides a robust, profile-based overclocking solution for novice and experienced overclockers. Easily overclock your platform by selecting the predefined profile in the BIOS, or manually adjust frequency and timings to extract maximum performance from your system.

What is your CPU?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a c 146 } Memory
February 9, 2012 1:58:26 PM

U can use this RAM, it is 1600, but your mobo will not loose any performance.

RAM has XMP and your mobo will be able to use the faster 1600MHz instead.

But, if u will insist on 1333MHz, this one is great!
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a c 146 } Memory
February 9, 2012 2:00:36 PM

I have 2600K and I am using 1600MHz @ 1600MHz without any problem.

The native recommended speed for the RAM with use with 2600K is 1333MHz.

Works great!
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February 9, 2012 2:12:25 PM

nikorr said:
OK, what about this one?

SUPPORT FOR INTEL XMP
Intel Extreme Memory profiles (XMP) technology provides a robust, profile-based overclocking solution for novice and experienced overclockers. Easily overclock your platform by selecting the predefined profile in the BIOS, or manually adjust frequency and timings to extract maximum performance from your system.

What is your CPU?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

here are the specs
intel core i5 2400
Gigabyte H61M-S2P-B3
xfx pro series 450w
zotac gtx 560 1gb
seagate barracuda 3gb/s 500gb 7200rpm
as mine is a h61 overclocking is not possible so pls tell me the fastest 1333mhz 2x4gb ram for the above mobo..
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a c 146 } Memory
February 9, 2012 3:07:42 PM

It says Page not found, not really, but the differences are only with in the benchmarks only, in the real life u will never see the difference.

I like Corsair the best, never failed me or the PC I build!
Corsair
G Skill
Kingston ...and others ...
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a c 146 } Memory
February 9, 2012 3:16:17 PM

CAS Latency Timing

CAS latency timing is not something new to DDR3, and it is one of the few items that remains unchanged in the new format. You may wonder why I used the term "unchanged", when every enthusiast in every web forum world-wide has jumped on their soapbox and chastised anyone considering DDR3 because of the higher latencies. The simple fact is that you cannot extend base frequencies without also extending the CAS delay, and DDR3 is actually requires less latency in comparison.

As a quick refresher, you might recall that 1066MHz DDR2 began with CL5 and CL6 latencies, and eventually improved to CL4 in rare cases of special IC module binning. So it should be considered a vast improvement in comparison that 1333 MHz DDR3 can achieve CL5, and some 1800 MHz DDR3 modules such as Corsair's PC3-14400 kit which have received careful parts binning can operate on CL7 timings.

Putting this arguement into greater perspective, drift back to the first days of DDR2. I can still remember the complaints back then, although to a lesser extent, about the increased latency. Back in those days, 400 MHz DDR was often times seen with CL2 timings, so keep that in mind when you look at the 800 MHz DDR2 presently available at a 100% latency increase to CL4 timings. In comparison, the CL7 timings of 1600 MHz DDR3 are still ahead of the curve by 25%, or even up to 50% faster latencies with OCZ's CL6 DDR3.

The bottom line is that enthusiasts need to hone in on the truth behind the technology, and ignore the self-serving ignorance that often runs rampant in most technology forums. The same person who condescends the idea of using DDR3 is also the same person who doesn't know the reason for the difference in architecture. The reality of the matter is that DDR3 is actually a better memory in terms of latency timings, especially compared against DDR2. So now imagine how tight the timings will be once the now infantile manufacturing process evolves from 90 nm to 70 nm; these latency timings will only get better.

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
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February 9, 2012 3:21:09 PM

nikorr said:
It says Page not found, not really, but the differences are only with in the benchmarks only, in the real life u will never see the difference.

I like Corsair the best, never failed me or the PC I build!
Corsair
G Skill
Kingston ...and others ...

sorry for the problem http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-... if corsair is best pls tell me a 2x4gb ram from corsair as i want to invest in best
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February 9, 2012 3:24:12 PM

nikorr said:
CAS Latency Timing

CAS latency timing is not something new to DDR3, and it is one of the few items that remains unchanged in the new format. You may wonder why I used the term "unchanged", when every enthusiast in every web forum world-wide has jumped on their soapbox and chastised anyone considering DDR3 because of the higher latencies. The simple fact is that you cannot extend base frequencies without also extending the CAS delay, and DDR3 is actually requires less latency in comparison.

As a quick refresher, you might recall that 1066MHz DDR2 began with CL5 and CL6 latencies, and eventually improved to CL4 in rare cases of special IC module binning. So it should be considered a vast improvement in comparison that 1333 MHz DDR3 can achieve CL5, and some 1800 MHz DDR3 modules such as Corsair's PC3-14400 kit which have received careful parts binning can operate on CL7 timings.

Putting this arguement into greater perspective, drift back to the first days of DDR2. I can still remember the complaints back then, although to a lesser extent, about the increased latency. Back in those days, 400 MHz DDR was often times seen with CL2 timings, so keep that in mind when you look at the 800 MHz DDR2 presently available at a 100% latency increase to CL4 timings. In comparison, the CL7 timings of 1600 MHz DDR3 are still ahead of the curve by 25%, or even up to 50% faster latencies with OCZ's CL6 DDR3.

The bottom line is that enthusiasts need to hone in on the truth behind the technology, and ignore the self-serving ignorance that often runs rampant in most technology forums. The same person who condescends the idea of using DDR3 is also the same person who doesn't know the reason for the difference in architecture. The reality of the matter is that DDR3 is actually a better memory in terms of latency timings, especially compared against DDR2. So now imagine how tight the timings will be once the now infantile manufacturing process evolves from 90 nm to 70 nm; these latency timings will only get better.

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

is there any huge difference between latencies on real world performance.. as my mobo cannot support 1600mhz im staying with a 1333mhz with highest speed otherwise surely i would go to 1600mhz..
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a c 146 } Memory
February 9, 2012 3:28:36 PM

vishalaestro said:
is there any huge difference between latencies on real world performance.. as my mobo cannot support 1600mhz im staying with a 1333mhz with highest speed otherwise surely i would go to 1600mhz..

Nothing that u would ever noticed in the real life, only synthetic benchmarks will show some differences. It would be in milliseconds. (1sec/1000milisec)
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a c 146 } Memory
February 9, 2012 3:29:11 PM

vishalaestro said:
sorry for the problem http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-... if corsair is best pls tell me a 2x4gb ram from corsair as i want to invest in best

There are 3 top makers, does not matter, who do u get, if u are budget oriented.

It just happen that I like Corsair, because no problems.
I would buy G Skill too: )
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Best solution

February 9, 2012 4:11:13 PM

The Corsair XMS 4GBx2 would work great.

Best ram purchase I've made in nearly 10 years. At $125.99 from one of these seller, I brought 2 boxes of these ram sticks to future proof my system for the price of 8GB of RAM anywhere else.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003ZDJ42O/ref=as_li_s...
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February 10, 2012 3:25:34 PM

Best answer selected by vishalaestro.
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February 10, 2012 3:26:08 PM

thanks for the answers guys..found the required ram..
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a c 146 } Memory
February 10, 2012 3:27:15 PM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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