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image scanning hardware

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Anonymous
February 8, 2005 5:43:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

For some time now I've been thinking I could do with a scanner. Up til now,
if I've had any scanning to do I've used the scanner at the office.

I have just acquired a number of old photos which I'd like to scan. None of
the photos are particularly large but the problem is that some of them are
framed and/or mounted and I don't want to risk damaging them by dismantling
them. The scanner at the office has a hinged lid which doesn't come off and
only opens to 90 degrees so there seems to be no way to scan an image which
is in the middle of a large mount or frame.

Is this common or are there devices which can scan the middle part of a
large original? I had a look at some scanner specs but I couldn't find
anything to indicate whether the covers came off or folded right back. I
can't believe I'm the only one to have this problem. Anyone care to make
any suggestions as to what I should be looking for in the product specs. or
perhaps to recommend a some models which would meet my requirements.

I'm not looking for anything fancy and can only afford to dip into the lower
end of the consumer price band. I am based in the UK, if that makes any
difference.

Keith
Anonymous
February 8, 2005 5:43:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Keith Sheppard wrote:

> For some time now I've been thinking I could do with a scanner. Up til now,
> if I've had any scanning to do I've used the scanner at the office.
>
> I have just acquired a number of old photos which I'd like to scan. None of
> the photos are particularly large but the problem is that some of them are
> framed and/or mounted and I don't want to risk damaging them by dismantling
> them. The scanner at the office has a hinged lid which doesn't come off and
> only opens to 90 degrees so there seems to be no way to scan an image which
> is in the middle of a large mount or frame.
>
> Is this common or are there devices which can scan the middle part of a
> large original? I had a look at some scanner specs but I couldn't find
> anything to indicate whether the covers came off or folded right back. I
> can't believe I'm the only one to have this problem. Anyone care to make
> any suggestions as to what I should be looking for in the product specs. or
> perhaps to recommend a some models which would meet my requirements.
>
> I'm not looking for anything fancy and can only afford to dip into the lower
> end of the consumer price band. I am based in the UK, if that makes any
> difference.
>
> Keith
>
>
I am on my third flatbed (print) scanner. All of mine have had
removable lids for scanning books, framed prints, etc.
Anonymous
February 9, 2005 5:30:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Kibo informs me that "Keith Sheppard" <keith.sheppard@tesco.net> stated
that:

>For some time now I've been thinking I could do with a scanner. Up til now,
>if I've had any scanning to do I've used the scanner at the office.
>
>I have just acquired a number of old photos which I'd like to scan. None of
>the photos are particularly large but the problem is that some of them are
>framed and/or mounted and I don't want to risk damaging them by dismantling
>them. The scanner at the office has a hinged lid which doesn't come off and
>only opens to 90 degrees so there seems to be no way to scan an image which
>is in the middle of a large mount or frame.
>
>Is this common or are there devices which can scan the middle part of a
>large original?

Unless the frame is very thick, you can use your usual scanner by
leaving the lid up & putting a phone book or something similar on your
picture to make sure it sits flat while being scanned. I've used that
trick to scan all sorts of oddly shaped objects, & it works very well on
most scanners.

--
W
. | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
\|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
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Anonymous
February 9, 2005 1:15:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>>Unless the frame is very thick, you can use your usual scanner by
>>leaving the lid up & putting a phone book or something similar on your
>>picture to make sure it sits flat while being scanned. I've used that
>>trick to scan all sorts of oddly shaped objects, & it works very well on
>>most scanners.

On the scanner at the office, the lid only opens to 90 degrees so there's a
solid obstruction (the hinge etc) all the way down one side at about 2
inches from the edge of the glass.

Keith
Anonymous
February 10, 2005 1:54:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Keith Sheppard" <keith.sheppard@tesco.net> wrote in message
news:HolOd.135$w%6.118@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
>>>Unless the frame is very thick, you can use your usual scanner by
>>>leaving the lid up & putting a phone book or something similar on your
>>>picture to make sure it sits flat while being scanned. I've used that
>>>trick to scan all sorts of oddly shaped objects, & it works very well on
>>>most scanners.
>
> On the scanner at the office, the lid only opens to 90 degrees so there's
> a
> solid obstruction (the hinge etc) all the way down one side at about 2
> inches from the edge of the glass.
>
> Keith
Turn the (phone) book through 180 degrees then turn the copy a further 180
degrees to read.
!