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Windows experience index question

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February 9, 2012 3:19:15 PM

I have been debating getting a new video card and ram for a few weeks now, but from what I read the new 7000 radeons will be out soon, so I am holding off on the video card.

I did however buy some new ram and had to refresh my windows experience index.

My graphic subscores beforehand were 5.3 and 5.4.... my memory one was 7.4.

After installing the new ram my graphic subscores went up to 7.3 and 7.4...

My question is.... why in the world would my graphic scores go up that much just from adding new ram? I upgraded from 4gb of ram to 8gb, but I never remotely used the 4gb really and when you're just sitting at the desktop I wouldn't think 4 to 8 would matter.
a c 146 } Memory
a b U Graphics card
February 9, 2012 3:40:38 PM

What is the Windows Experience Index?

The Windows Experience Index measures the capability of your computer's hardware and software configuration and expresses this measurement as a number called a base score. A higher base score generally means that your computer will perform better and faster than a computer with a lower base score, especially when performing more advanced and resource-intensive tasks.

Each hardware component receives an individual subscore. Your computer's base score is determined by the lowest subscore. For example, if the lowest subscore of an individual hardware component is 2.6, then the base score is 2.6. The base score is not an average of the combined subscores.

You can use the base score to confidently buy programs and other software that are matched to your computer's base score. For example, if your computer has a base score of 3.3, then you can confidently purchase any software designed for this version of Windows that requires a computer with a base score of 3 or lower.

The base scores currently range from 1 to 5.9. The Windows Experience Index is designed to accommodate advances in computer technology. As hardware speed and performance improves, higher base scores will be introduced. However, the standards for each level of the index stay the same. For example, a computer scored as a 2.8 will remain a 2.8 unless you decide to upgrade the computer's hardware.
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February 9, 2012 3:45:49 PM

um.... thanks, but I know what it is. I just don't understand why upgrading my RAM would increase my graphic score.... really doesn't make sense to me. One would think a new video card would be the only way to increase it.

I have win7 64bit btw.

All my scores are in the 7.3/7.4 range now, which is nice. I still think I need a new video card.

I just wanted an answer for my own curiosity. Not knowing why it increased will bother me otherwise. :pt1cable: 
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a c 146 } Memory
a b U Graphics card
February 9, 2012 3:51:06 PM

joleme said:
um.... thanks, but I know what it is. I just don't understand why upgrading my RAM would increase my graphic score.... really doesn't make sense to me. One would think a new video card would be the only way to increase it.

I have win7 64bit btw.

All my scores are in the 7.3/7.4 range now, which is nice. I still think I need a new video card.

I just wanted an answer for my own curiosity. Not knowing why it increased will bother me otherwise. :pt1cable: 

WEI is pretty useless as a benchmark, maybe more bandwidth is responsible : )
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Anonymous
April 1, 2013 10:16:40 AM

Your computer uses the "Dedicated RAM" on your video card, as well as your systems RAM to render graphics. So when you upgraded your RAM you allowed your system to use more memory for graphics, causing the better score. More RAM will always help with resource intensive tasks, like graphics.
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