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thinkpad password removal

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 12:35:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I just bought a barebones laptop to transfer my hd and ram to because my
old unit was showing external, signs of wear. This new one seems to have
some sort of boot password so that I cannot get past counting ram &
cannot get into the bios. Both machines are IBM Thinkpad 755CE.

Can anyone tell me how to disable the password?

bill

__
alienbill@wyoming.com
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 12:35:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

alienbill wrote:
>
> I just bought a barebones laptop to transfer my hd and ram to because my
> old unit was showing external, signs of wear. This new one seems to have
> some sort of boot password so that I cannot get past counting ram &
> cannot get into the bios. Both machines are IBM Thinkpad 755CE.
>
> Can anyone tell me how to disable the password?

The previous owner?

Notan
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 12:35:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

alienbill@wyoming.com (alienbill) writes:
> I just bought a barebones laptop to transfer my hd and ram to because my
> old unit was showing external, signs of wear. This new one seems to have
> some sort of boot password so that I cannot get past counting ram &
> cannot get into the bios. Both machines are IBM Thinkpad 755CE.
>
> Can anyone tell me how to disable the password?

There is something in the HMM (hardware maintenance manual) about this.
See the IBM web site and search around. I don't think you an just disconnect
the cmos battery, even on an old machine like the 755CE. Simplest
method may be swap motherboards between the machines.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 2:01:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

alienbill wrote:
> I just bought a barebones laptop to transfer my hd and ram to because my
> old unit was showing external, signs of wear. This new one seems to have
> some sort of boot password so that I cannot get past counting ram &
> cannot get into the bios. Both machines are IBM Thinkpad 755CE.
>
> Can anyone tell me how to disable the password?
>
> bill
>
> __
> alienbill@wyoming.com
assuming your laptop is the same model, you will have to disassemble
both units and swap the motherboards as well.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 2:27:53 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Albert Wong wrote:
> alienbill wrote:
>
>> I just bought a barebones laptop to transfer my hd and ram to because my
>> old unit was showing external, signs of wear. This new one seems to have
>> some sort of boot password so that I cannot get past counting ram &
>> cannot get into the bios. Both machines are IBM Thinkpad 755CE.
>>
>> Can anyone tell me how to disable the password?
>>
>> bill
>>
>> __
>> alienbill@wyoming.com
>
> assuming your laptop is the same model, you will have to disassemble
> both units and swap the motherboards as well.
the 755ce is a 486. Maybe all you have to do is to reset CMOS. If
there is cmos battery, disconnect it for a few minutes and then
reconnect and restart the thinkpad.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 7:29:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid&gt; wrote in message
news:7xzmw8brww.fsf@ruckus.brouhaha.com...
Date: 08 Apr 2005 19:33:19 -0700

There is something in the HMM (hardware maintenance manual) about
this. See the IBM web site and search around. I don't think you an
just disconnect the cmos battery, even on an old machine like the
755CE. Simplest method may be swap motherboards between the
machines.

Who in the right mind would purchase a laptop that the password couldn't
be reset by disconnecting the CMOS battery? As if you lost the password,
the motherboard turns to pure junk! No wonder IBM can't make it in this
world!


Cheers!


___________________________________________
Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
-- written and edited within Word 2000
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 2:14:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

BillW50 wrote:

> Who in the right mind would purchase a laptop that the password
> couldn't be reset by disconnecting the CMOS battery?

People that want a laptop that makes it difficult for thieves to make use of
the stolen notebook?

> As if you lost
> the password, the motherboard turns to pure junk! No wonder IBM can't
> make it in this world!

This is no bug, it's a feature. One reason why only amateurs and idiots
steal an IBM Thinkpad...

Benjamin
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 4:51:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Benjamin Gawert" <bgawert@gmx.de> wrote in message
news:3bph7uF6jjj70U1@individual.net...
Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2005 10:14:48 +0200

BillW50 wrote:

> Who in the right mind would purchase a laptop that the password
> couldn't be reset by disconnecting the CMOS battery?

People that want a laptop that makes it difficult for thieves to
make use of the stolen notebook?

Hi Benjamin! They do? Gee I would think they rather not have their
notebook stolen in the first place.

> As if you lost the password, the motherboard turns to pure junk! No
> wonder IBM can't make it in this world!

This is no bug, it's a feature. One reason why only amateurs and
idiots steal an IBM Thinkpad...

Well according to EV, even amateurs and idiots can bypass the geniuses
at IBM. Go figure?

http://www.driverforum.com/harddrive3/1642.html


Cheers!


___________________________________________
Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
-- written and edited within Word 2000
April 9, 2005 4:53:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

If I remember right there are a couple pins by the cmos battery that have to
be shorted. Remove cmos battery, short the pins ,power up, power off and
remove the short and plug in the battery.....


"alienbill" <alienbill@wyoming.com> wrote in message
news:1gupvps.1m5zwrmvyvb0wN%alienbill@wyoming.com...
>I just bought a barebones laptop to transfer my hd and ram to because my
> old unit was showing external, signs of wear. This new one seems to have
> some sort of boot password so that I cannot get past counting ram &
> cannot get into the bios. Both machines are IBM Thinkpad 755CE.
>
> Can anyone tell me how to disable the password?
>
> bill
>
> __
> alienbill@wyoming.com
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 7:16:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

--
jankro (@) saunalahti (.) fi
Please notice my new address!

"BillW50" <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote in message
news:B_H5e.83$m84.6@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...

"Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid&gt; wrote in message
news:7xzmw8brww.fsf@ruckus.brouhaha.com...
Date: 08 Apr 2005 19:33:19 -0700

There is something in the HMM (hardware maintenance manual) about
this. See the IBM web site and search around. I don't think you an
just disconnect the cmos battery, even on an old machine like the
755CE. Simplest method may be swap motherboards between the
machines.

Who in the right mind would purchase a laptop that the password couldn't
be reset by disconnecting the CMOS battery? As if you lost the password,
the motherboard turns to pure junk! No wonder IBM can't make it in this
world!


Cheers!


___________________________________________
Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
-- written and edited within Word 2000

Most new laptops have this special "security chip" that cannot be defeated
by removing battery.
Only other option is new security chip or new mobo, unless of course, you
have an access to the previous owner.
I used once a guy who I found in Aussie, who could find out the password, I
found him with google and if I remember correctly, it was "joe from
australia"

JMK
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 7:16:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"JMK" <jankro (@) saunalahti (.) fi> wrote in message
news:7KP5e.2081$bC2.189@reader1.news.jippii.net...
Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2005 15:16:38 +0300

Most new laptops have this special "security chip" that cannot be
defeated by removing battery.

Only other option is new security chip or new mobo, unless of
course, you have an access to the previous owner.

I used once a guy who I found in Aussie, who could find out the
password, I found him with google and if I remember correctly, it
was "joe from australia"

Well I just did a Google search myself and according to JV, it can be
reset with a mere 1.5 volts being supplied to grounding pins on the
security chip. So much for security!

http://www.driverforum.com/harddrive3/1642.html


Cheers!


___________________________________________
Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
-- written and edited within Word 2000
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 9:02:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

BillW50 wrote:

>
> "JMK" <jankro (@) saunalahti (.) fi> wrote in message
> news:7KP5e.2081$bC2.189@reader1.news.jippii.net...
> Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2005 15:16:38 +0300
>
> Most new laptops have this special "security chip" that cannot be
> defeated by removing battery.
>
> Only other option is new security chip or new mobo, unless of
> course, you have an access to the previous owner.
>
> I used once a guy who I found in Aussie, who could find out the
> password, I found him with google and if I remember correctly, it
> was "joe from australia"
>
> Well I just did a Google search myself and according to JV, it can be
> reset with a mere 1.5 volts being supplied to grounding pins on the
> security chip. So much for security!
>
> http://www.driverforum.com/harddrive3/1642.html

Assuming of course that that method actually works.
>
>
> Cheers!
>
>
> ___________________________________________
> Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
> -- written and edited within Word 2000

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 9:07:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

BillW50 wrote:

>
> "Benjamin Gawert" <bgawert@gmx.de> wrote in message
> news:3bph7uF6jjj70U1@individual.net...
> Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2005 10:14:48 +0200
>
> BillW50 wrote:
>
>> Who in the right mind would purchase a laptop that the password
>> couldn't be reset by disconnecting the CMOS battery?
>
> People that want a laptop that makes it difficult for thieves to
> make use of the stolen notebook?
>
> Hi Benjamin! They do? Gee I would think they rather not have their
> notebook stolen in the first place.

Most of the citizens of Hiroshima would rather not have had an atomic bomb
dropped on their heads either. What one would rather and what happens are
not always the same.
>
>> As if you lost the password, the motherboard turns to pure junk! No
>> wonder IBM can't make it in this world!
>
> This is no bug, it's a feature. One reason why only amateurs and
> idiots steal an IBM Thinkpad...
>
> Well according to EV, even amateurs and idiots can bypass the geniuses
> at IBM. Go figure?
>
> http://www.driverforum.com/harddrive3/1642.html

He didn't say what specific password it would remove. A Thinkpad can have
several. The procedure that he described will most assuredly _not_ work on
a hard drive password as the chip that he suggests attacking is not _on_
the hard drive.

> Cheers!
>
>
> ___________________________________________
> Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
> -- written and edited within Word 2000

--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 9, 2005 10:16:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

--
jankro (@) saunalahti (.) fi
Please notice my new address!

"BillW50" <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote in message
news:b5Q5e.418$gI3.366@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...

"JMK" <jankro (@) saunalahti (.) fi> wrote in message
news:7KP5e.2081$bC2.189@reader1.news.jippii.net...
Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2005 15:16:38 +0300

Most new laptops have this special "security chip" that cannot be
defeated by removing battery.

Only other option is new security chip or new mobo, unless of
course, you have an access to the previous owner.

I used once a guy who I found in Aussie, who could find out the
password, I found him with google and if I remember correctly, it
was "joe from australia"

Well I just did a Google search myself and according to JV, it can be
reset with a mere 1.5 volts being supplied to grounding pins on the
security chip. So much for security!

http://www.driverforum.com/harddrive3/1642.html


Cheers!


___________________________________________
Bill (using a HP AMD 1.2GHZ & Windows 2000)
-- written and edited within Word 2000

Very interesting. Have to try that on my own laptop ;-)

JMK
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 10, 2005 2:02:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Albert Wong <noone@nowhere.000> wrote:

> assuming your laptop is the same model, you will have to disassemble
> both units and swap the motherboards as well.

Any idea where I can find instructions for disassembly? I've wrecked a
couple Thinkpads trying to get inside them. The cmos battery removal
doesn't seem to do the trick. I'd like to either change the boards, or
at least salvage the keyboard to use in my original one as that was the
major problem initially.

Thanks.

bill

__
alienbill@wyoming.com
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 10, 2005 2:59:27 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"BillW50" <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:
>Well I just did a Google search myself and according to JV, it can be
>reset with a mere 1.5 volts being supplied to grounding pins on the
>security chip. So much for security!
>
>http://www.driverforum.com/harddrive3/1642.html

I dunno, the engineer in me wants to cringe at that vague and
confusing description. Also, the "I can also recover those locked
drives (with a software program)" seems to fly in the face of the
established wisdom here about HDD passwords.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 10, 2005 3:34:03 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

alienbill wrote:
> Albert Wong <noone@nowhere.000> wrote:
>
>
>>assuming your laptop is the same model, you will have to disassemble
>>both units and swap the motherboards as well.
>
>
> Any idea where I can find instructions for disassembly? I've wrecked a
> couple Thinkpads trying to get inside them. The cmos battery removal
> doesn't seem to do the trick. I'd like to either change the boards, or
> at least salvage the keyboard to use in my original one as that was the
> major problem initially.
disassembling the antique is going to be tough, many intricate case
parts and boards. I currently can't find the service manual of this
model. It will have to be trial and error, with maticulous cataloging,
hopefully you will have enough good parts from 2 units to get 1 up and
working. best wishes.

a

>
> Thanks.
>
> bill
>
> __
> alienbill@wyoming.com
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 10, 2005 3:52:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

William P. N. Smith wrote:
> "BillW50" <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:
>
>>Well I just did a Google search myself and according to JV, it can be
>>reset with a mere 1.5 volts being supplied to grounding pins on the
>>security chip. So much for security!
>>
>>http://www.driverforum.com/harddrive3/1642.html
>
>
> I dunno, the engineer in me wants to cringe at that vague and
> confusing description. Also, the "I can also recover those locked
> drives (with a software program)" seems to fly in the face of the
> established wisdom here about HDD passwords.
>
modern thinkpads store password,as well as the checksum value, in the
eeprom If you by chance manage to reset the eeprom, you will get CRC
error, because the checksum value will also disappear. You may need to
replace the eeprom for the computer to work again.

this is not true with other OEM laptops. They just store password in
the eeprom. If you manage to reset the eeprom, you can get the laptop
to boot. These oem don't find the additional ibm security feature to
be worth the trouble.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 10, 2005 5:37:38 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Re: "Who in the right mind would purchase a laptop that the password
couldn't be reset by disconnecting the CMOS battery?"

You need to get a clue. VERY FEW laptops can have the password reset by
removing the CMOS battery. The password is normally stored in flash
EEROM, which in non-volatile and does not require or use any power for
password retention. And it's been this way, for almost all laptops, for
about a decade or more.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 10, 2005 8:18:27 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

alienbill wrote:
> Albert Wong <noone@nowhere.000> wrote:
>
>> assuming your laptop is the same model, you will have to disassemble
>> both units and swap the motherboards as well.
>
> Any idea where I can find instructions for disassembly? I've wrecked a
> couple Thinkpads trying to get inside them. The cmos battery removal
> doesn't seem to do the trick. I'd like to either change the boards, or
> at least salvage the keyboard to use in my original one as that was
> the major problem initially.

http://penwin.stg.net/files/ibm/360/tpvol2.pdf

Regards,

James
April 10, 2005 7:56:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote:

>Re: "Who in the right mind would purchase a laptop that the password
>couldn't be reset by disconnecting the CMOS battery?"
>
>You need to get a clue. VERY FEW laptops can have the password reset by
>removing the CMOS battery. The password is normally stored in flash
>EEROM, which in non-volatile and does not require or use any power for
>password retention. And it's been this way, for almost all laptops, for
>about a decade or more.

I certainly hope it is very difficult preferably very expensive as well to
remove the Bios Password. Serve the scumbag right for nicking my A31 about
6 months ago.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 10, 2005 7:56:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Andy@nospam.co.uk" wrote:
>
> <snip>
>
> I certainly hope it is very difficult preferably very expensive as well to
> remove the Bios Password. Serve the scumbag right for nicking my A31 about
> 6 months ago.

Not that I really care, but who, and what, the hell are you talking about?

Notan
April 10, 2005 10:54:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Notan <notan@ddress.com> wrote:

>"Andy@nospam.co.uk" wrote:
>>
>> <snip>
>>
>> I certainly hope it is very difficult preferably very expensive as well to
>> remove the Bios Password. Serve the scumbag right for nicking my A31 about
>> 6 months ago.
>
>Not that I really care, but who, and what, the hell are you talking about?
>
>Notan

As you would see from the thread the discussion was difficulties in
removing Bios Passwords from Thinkpads .

I am hoping that it is remarkably difficult and expensive to remove the
Bios Password from a Thinkpad. This would mean the person who stole my A31
(which is a Thinkpad) would not be able to use it without great difficulty
and expense.

Sorry I should not have used the words scumbag and nicked, they are english
slang words.

Andy
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 10, 2005 10:54:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Andy@nospam.co.uk" wrote:
>
> Notan <notan@ddress.com> wrote:
>
> >"Andy@nospam.co.uk" wrote:
> >>
> >> <snip>
> >>
> >> I certainly hope it is very difficult preferably very expensive as well to
> >> remove the Bios Password. Serve the scumbag right for nicking my A31 about
> >> 6 months ago.
> >
> >Not that I really care, but who, and what, the hell are you talking about?
> >
> >Notan
>
> As you would see from the thread the discussion was difficulties in
> removing Bios Passwords from Thinkpads .
>
> I am hoping that it is remarkably difficult and expensive to remove the
> Bios Password from a Thinkpad. This would mean the person who stole my A31
> (which is a Thinkpad) would not be able to use it without great difficulty
> and expense.
>
> Sorry I should not have used the words scumbag and nicked, they are english
> slang words.

"Scumbag" I understand. We've got that one, too! <g>

It was the "nicking" that threw me. I thought someone scratched your laptop,
which made your post somewhat confusing.

Thanks for the clarification!

Notan
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 11, 2005 7:53:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Service manuals with disassembly instructions for most models are on the
IBM web site.


alienbill wrote:
> Albert Wong <noone@nowhere.000> wrote:
>
>
>>assuming your laptop is the same model, you will have to disassemble
>>both units and swap the motherboards as well.
>
>
> Any idea where I can find instructions for disassembly? I've wrecked a
> couple Thinkpads trying to get inside them. The cmos battery removal
> doesn't seem to do the trick. I'd like to either change the boards, or
> at least salvage the keyboard to use in my original one as that was the
> major problem initially.
>
> Thanks.
>
> bill
>
> __
> alienbill@wyoming.com
October 28, 2007 11:17:58 PM

google ibmpass for additional information
December 7, 2009 2:45:29 AM

A. By Using the Motherboard Jumper:

In most motherboards CMOS battery is soldered, which makes it difficult to remove the battery. In this case we use another method.

Almost all motherboards contain a jumper that can clear all CMOS settings along with the BIOS password. The location of this jumper varies depending upon the motherboard brand. You should read your motherboard manual to check its location. If you don't have the manual then look for the jumpers near the CMOS battery. Most of the manufacturer label the jumper as CLR, CLEAR, CLEAR CMOS, etc.

When you find the jumper, look carefully. There will be 3 pins and the jumper will be joining the center pin to either left or right pin. What you need to do, is remove the jumper and join the center pin to the opposite pin. e.g. if the jumper joins center pin to left pin, then remove it and join center pin to right pin. Now wait for a few seconds and then again remove the jumper and join the center pin to left pin.

Make sure to turn the PC off before opening the cabinet and resetting the jumper.



B. By Using Software:


I have found that BIOS/CMOS Password Recovery Tool is the most effective.:
BIOS/CMOS Password Recovery Tool is a program that works instantly to remove any lost or forgotten BIOS/CMOS password. Simply boot your PC to DOS and execute the program, and get access to forgotten BIOS/CMOS passwords in just seconds

BIOS/CMOS Password Recovery Tool Service: http://www.biospasswordrecovery.com/
!