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Is my processor getting too hot?

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June 14, 2011 9:59:23 AM

Hello everyone. I left CPUID running while playing pretty demanding game and noticed my processor was getting really hot (around 67*C). So I downloaded Prime95 to see how hot it would make my processor with its stress test and it got up to 73*C. When my computer is idle my processor is about 48*C. I don't really know what's causing it to run so hot. I have 3 fans blowing almost directly on it (not including the heat sink), two on the top of the case, one on the back. Then I also have one on the side blowing inward on the motherboard, and one in the front blowing out. I tried to re-arrange them before so the air was sucked in from the front, and blown out the back but it made everything run much hotter. I used to have an nvidia card that ran in the low 100's for a while - now it's in graphic card heaven, and I don't want to ruin my processor as well. Is my processor running too hot? Or should I not worry about it?

Thanks!

Here is a DXDIAG/CPUID screenshot.

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a c 159 à CPUs
June 14, 2011 10:09:18 AM

Using a stock amd heatsink? Several will work better, including the hyper 212 if you have room in your case.
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a c 102 à CPUs
June 14, 2011 10:17:51 AM

I would worry about those temps and I think from the sounds of it your airflow is a bit messed up, 1st thing I would try is play about with the fans.
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June 14, 2011 10:51:57 AM

Have you tried having all of the fans blowing air out of your case ? Get that hot air away from your components. Remember, negative air pressure does not get hot, so the air around your components will not add to your problems. Aside from that, invest £30 on a decent heatsink and fan combo. You will not regret it. I replaced my stock heatsink from my Gfxcard (HD4850), and knocked over 40 degrees C off of the idle temps.
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June 14, 2011 10:52:11 AM

Have you tried having all of the fans blowing air out of your case ? Get that hot air away from your components. Remember, negative air pressure does not get hot, so the air around your components will not add to your problems. Aside from that, invest £30 on a decent heatsink and fan combo. You will not regret it. I replaced my stock heatsink from my Gfxcard (HD4850), and knocked over 40 degrees C off of the idle temps.
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June 14, 2011 10:52:58 AM

Have you tried having all of the fans blowing air out of your case ? Get that hot air away from your components. Remember, negative air pressure does not get hot, so the air around your components will not add to your problems. Aside from that, invest £30 on a decent heatsink and fan combo. You will not regret it. I replaced my stock heatsink from my Gfxcard (HD4850), and knocked over 40 degrees C off of the idle temps.
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a c 102 à CPUs
June 14, 2011 11:03:31 AM

You don't want them all blowing out as they are fighting each other as there is nowhere for enough air to get in.
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June 14, 2011 10:08:57 PM

Thanks for the replies everyone! I dusted off my heat sink and it made it run about 10*C cooler, gonna invest in a better heat sink.
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June 14, 2011 10:09:53 PM

Best answer selected by Bruzurk.
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a b à CPUs
June 15, 2011 12:21:57 AM

The best fan configuration is bottom to top, generally with intake at the front/bottom and exhaust at the back/top. There should be slightly more intake than exhaust pressure; this will keep dust from being drawn in through non-fan, non-filtered openings.

My point here is that the best answer is certainly wrong.
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June 15, 2011 1:21:50 PM

The best answer is kinda wrong. You can either go for a positive pressure system or a negative pressure system.

Positive - higher CFM coming into the case (ie more intake than exhaust) - this causes air inside the case to be blown out of not only the exhaust fans, but also out of all other holes possible. This essentially helps prevent dust from getting into your case (assuming you have filters over your intake fans)

Negative - higher exhaust CFM (ie more exhaust than intake) - this causes air to be sucked IN to your case from all possible holes. Therefore you have lots of dust getting pulled into your case from every little opening. The advantage here is that you will have air circulation in every little nook and cranny of your case. The disadvantage is that dust build-up is bad news for electronic components - so if you go with a negative pressure system, be sure to use a case that has air filters everywhere, not just at the fans.

Most people go with a positive pressure due to the dust issue. But I certainly don't think its a good idea having ALL your fans set to exhaust. But then again, people often achieve unexpected and surprising results when playing around with fan setups - so just play around. Essentially what you should aim for is a good, one-directional FLOW of air THROUGH your case.
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