Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Gaming computer advice

Last response: in CPUs
Share
June 15, 2011 6:20:27 AM

I currently have a Dell XPS 400 and am looking to upgrade. I have been told I should build my own computer but I do not know much about computers so I would not know where to start. So I am looking for some help in pointing me in the right direction. Thanks for any help.

More about : gaming computer advice

June 15, 2011 6:33:22 AM

*Very* vague question.

the important things are your budget and requirements
Are you wanting to upgrade your current machine or build a new one.

If upgrading what have you already got in your machine? (as its dell provide the service tag if thats where your going)
a c 103 à CPUs
June 15, 2011 6:33:59 AM

Check out the homebuild section, theres guides aplenty in the stickies at the top, and if you fill http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/261222-13-build-adv... in with your details, we can get to sorting a build to your budget and needs,
all you need to build a pc is unhurried time, a clean static free surface (wooden table is fine, no carpets on floor is also useful)
A phillips screwdriver and if you wish, a anti static wristband,
its easy as pie if you think things through, take precautions for safety and static, and if in doubt, ask before doing,
hope to see your post soon man, well done for taking the plunge, We'll see you right :) 
**we posted at same time Monk, Op wants to build new, but is in need of confidence and a guiding bit of help,**
Moto
Related resources
a b à CPUs
a b 4 Gaming
June 15, 2011 12:47:56 PM

@Fargi, I built my 1st comp this past Feb...it was very simple, I saved money, and i got quality components. Prebuilt PC manufacturers are in it to turn a profit and will cut corners. This could mean having a nice cpu and gpu, but skimping on the mobo, psu, ram etc.

Tom's has articles a plenty on how to guide you through the process...ask a lot of questions. Also i found it helpful using YouTube for video guides.

One thing I found out (the hard way) was dont skimp on the mobo. Dont get me wrong the one i have works fine, but i have no path for upgrades (sli/crossfire) and i didnt do enough homework and the mobo i have cannot be overclocked.

If your budget allows, I strongly recommend an SSD (at least 64GB) to run your OS.

good luck and let us know how it goes.
June 15, 2011 8:33:49 PM

Thanks for the advice. It seems super intimidating but it looks like these forums will help me out a lot.
June 15, 2011 8:45:58 PM

fargi23 said:
Thanks for the advice. It seems super intimidating but it looks like these forums will help me out a lot.


nah, don't let it intimidate you.

like someone else said, the two most important things are budget and what you are going to use it for. In other words, dont expect to max out the most demanding games on the highest resolutions on a $400 machine lol. Figure out what your budget is and then come back and let us know what you want to do with it.

But for the barebone stuff in your **newly built** comp, you will need:

Operating system
Computer Case
Power Supply
Motherboard (which must support your cpu)
CPU
Graphics card (if you plan on gaming with the comp. If its for general purposes you can get away with a graphics driver already in a motherboard)
RAM

To save money, you can use the monitor, keyboard/mouse, Hard drive and disk drive from your old computer most likely. Otherwise, add these to the list.

After you have all these, its a matter of hooking them up to each other, which is relatively simple
a b à CPUs
a b 4 Gaming
June 15, 2011 10:46:13 PM

That carpet comment is unwarranted. Just discharge your static to some metal surface. My build happened on a glass table over carpeting.
A basic, nongaming computer can be built for approximately $400, including OS (assuming Windows 7 Home at $100)
You can put together a fairly good gaming build (way over general-use) for around $700, including OS.
At around $1500, you hit the limit of excellence in gaming builds (all current games can be maxed out on 2560 x 1600 resolution), excluding multi-monitor setups, which are kickass and could run around $2000.
a c 85 à CPUs
a b 4 Gaming
June 16, 2011 6:22:04 AM

As for the assembling, watch videos on youtube. There will probably be minor errors in each one, but if you watch a bunch of them you should have a good idea of how to get the parts to fit together.
!