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Gpu overheat alarms & shutdowns...

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January 10, 2011 5:05:28 PM

Hello,
My friend just put a Corsair 850 watt power supply in his HP P6404y machine and tried to upgrade the Nvidia 9100 stock video card to an Nvidia GTX 460 and the machine would run fine, however when he tried to play games the machine would start beeping and shut down which is usually a symptom of a GPU overheat condition. He then returned the GTX460 and upgraded to a PNY GTX 470 thinking his first card was from a no-name vendor and the same problem occurs. He then put a large fan next to his computer with the side off and if the machine starts beeping he turns that on and can continue to run, but I told him that option is not recommended. There is nothing in the Bios to see what the settings are for heat monitoring on a GPU, and there is no log generated showing what the cause of the shutdown is. We have looked online for help and there is none available for this Pegatron m2n78-la motherboard made by Asus for HP. Is there any software
that allows us to monitor and change the settings for heat ranges on a GPU, or is there any other way to identify what the machine is monitoring for heat so we can try to fix this. The bios options are very limited so we really are stuck on this one. Please help!! Thanks





Chuck

P.S. Here is a link to the system specs. from HP.

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c02...
a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 5:10:16 PM

The jump from a GTX 460 to a GTX 470 is a good performance upgrade, however will make things WORSE temperature wise. The GTX 470's run VERY hot to begin with.

What you need to do however, is run a Temp monitoring program to log temperatures of your GPU and CPU so you can determine what's actually overheating. The case used for the HP P6404y isn't designed for high end cooling by any means. So you may very well just not have adequate cooling. Not to mention, they are probably using minimal/stock cooling for the CPU to begin with. If that CPU cooler is clogged with dust, the CPU could be what's overheating.

HP P6404y : AMD Phenom II X4 820 + 8GM RAM + M2N78-LA (Violet6) Motherboard
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c02...


Just looking at the case, I'd say there's not enough air intake to keep the CPU or GPU cool when gaming. Most aftermarket cases have a fan in the front to suck in air. This case doesn't have a sufficient air intake in the front.

You can use GPU-Z and CPU-Z to monitor temperatures of those individual items. Or you can download one of many other temp monitoring programs to watch both at once. HWMonitor is a good one (made by same folks as CPU-Z) that will allow you to see temperatures of the CPU, GPU, Motherboard, hard drives, etc. All at once even!

Have him us the HWMonitor program while gaming. He can close out the game after 5-10 minutes and look at HWMonitor. That program will show you what the "Max" temperature of each component during the time it was running. Give us those temperatures and we can point out which item was the likely problem. Screenshots help too!
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January 10, 2011 5:20:45 PM

jerreece said:
The jump from a GTX 460 to a GTX 470 is a good performance upgrade, however will make things WORSE temperature wise. The GTX 470's run VERY hot to begin with.

What you need to do however, is run a Temp monitoring program to log temperatures of your GPU and CPU so you can determine what's actually overheating. The case used for the HP P6404y isn't designed for high end cooling by any means. So you may very well just not have adequate cooling. Not to mention, they are probably using minimal/stock cooling for the CPU to begin with. If that CPU cooler is clogged with dust, the CPU could be what's overheating.

HP P6404y
http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Images/c02540588.jpg

You can use GPU-Z and CPU-Z to monitor temperatures of those individual items. Or you can download one of many other temp monitoring programs to watch both at once. HWMonitor is a good one (made by same folks as CPU-Z) that will allow you to see temperatures of the CPU, GPU, Motherboard, hard drives, etc. All at once even!



Thanks for the info!! He did make sure the CPU cooler was clean, along with everything inside the case, but I think you are right about the cooling capacity of the case. Funny part is the problem is almost instantanious. He tried to run the built in Windows 7 Assesment program and it too makes the machine beep just benchmarking the graphics. It did that on both the GTX4600 and the GTX4700 cards. He did download and run a program that shows the machine is only allowing the heat on the GPU to get to 60 degrees celcius, and we are hoping there is a program that allows you to adjust that setting. Nothing in the Bios or on any included software from HP will let us do that. From Nvidia the GTX4700 can run up to 105 deg. celcius, so we really need to change that setting on his system. Do you know of any software that lets you change the system setting for overheat limits??

Chuck
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 6:14:50 PM

You cannot override the temperature limits. In fact doing so would be incredibly stupid. The GTX 470 limits itself to 105C because anything hotter than that will destroy the card. (Keep in mind, 105C = 221 degrees Fahrenheit, where as 60C = 140F)

Now, if the software program (which you haven't named) shows the GTX 460 only reached 60C then that's not your problem. You likely have something else causing the shut down. If the GPU is only reaching 60C you might want to monitor your CPU temperature.

If that temperature is safe, you may very well have some other kind of hardware problem. Could even be the power supply causing a problem once the CPU & GPU are trying to pull a large amount of power through it. Make sure the GTX 470 has all the power connectors attached to it. It requires TWO (2) 6-pin PCI-E power connections from your power supply. It needs a hefty amount of electricity coming in. If he has a Corsair 850W power supply it will more than likely have the required power connectors for the video card.
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January 10, 2011 7:03:24 PM

jerreece said:
You cannot override the temperature limits. In fact doing so would be incredibly stupid. The GTX 470 limits itself to 105C because anything hotter than that will destroy the card. (Keep in mind, 105C = 221 degrees Fahrenheit, where as 60C = 140F)

Now, if the software program (which you haven't named) shows the GTX 460 only reached 60C then that's not your problem. You likely have something else causing the shut down. If the GPU is only reaching 60C you might want to monitor your CPU temperature.

If that temperature is safe, you may very well have some other kind of hardware problem. Could even be the power supply causing a problem once the CPU & GPU are trying to pull a large amount of power through it. Make sure the GTX 470 has all the power connectors attached to it. It requires TWO (2) 6-pin PCI-E power connections from your power supply. It needs a hefty amount of electricity coming in. If he has a Corsair 850W power supply it will more than likely have the required power connectors for the video card.





I agree that tampering with the settings would be stupid, but if the limit is set incorrectly for an onboard video card then there should be a way to tell the system what the new boards specs are. I have emailed my friend to get the name of the software he is using so we all are on the same page. I was pretty sure the software told him what the max range was not what the actual temp was, but I will confirm that with him. I will get back to you later. Thanks again for all of your help!!

Chuck
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 7:14:13 PM

Download HWMointor,it should list everything from the temps to fan speeds to voltage's.

Has you or your friend done any Overclocking to the GPU or CPU?If their are beeps coming from the mobo then that would lead me to think it's the CPU overheating not the GPU.

It is very possible that the GTX460/470 is overheating the CPU because of how much heat it is giving off(they are such large cards that if you don't have good airflow it will bake everything inside the case).Espically because it's an HP case and a very small Mid Tower case at that with little to no airflow.

I reccomend going and checking out those temps in HWMonitor, i doubt it's your GPU so watch the temps of the CPU right before it crashes and report back.

EDIY:Just looked up your CPU and the max temp is 71c so make sure it doesn't go above that.
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January 10, 2011 7:19:51 PM

I will have him do that. I know everything is stock, no overclocking, unless PNY out of the box is slightly tweeked. I still am troubled by the fact that the overheat happens in 10 seconds during video testing and simple gaming. None the less I will have him download and run HWMontior and report the results.

Chuck
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 7:22:29 PM

If the heatsink for the CPU is the stock heatsink than their is a greatly possibility that it might be the CPU that's overheating.
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 7:23:13 PM

Yeah sounds like CPU overheating to me as well. If a GPU overheats it won't beep it'll just BSOD and restart (usually).

Also whatever he's seeing about 60C max doesn't matter. The card isn't going to cause any issues at 60C, more than likely that is simply the point where the fan speed goes up. Considering having the side open and a fan blowing in helps the situation, then definitely it's a case air flow issue and probably some other component like that CPU overheating.

HWMonitor, as mentioned, is a great program which will show everything you need right now - core temps, gpu temps, mobo temps... it'll read every sensor. You can also see if the PSU voltages are what they should be.

I have a Corsair 750TX and it's a great PSU, unless you somehow got very unlucky with it I'd say your 850 is fine. Maybe something got plugged in wrong?
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January 10, 2011 7:57:28 PM

You know what...That is a good thought! The problem keeps happening during video testing, but the heat generated could be pushing the CPU out of range...Hmm....And I am certain that it is a stock CPU cooler. I will confirm the HWMonitor results asap. Thanks guys!!


Chuck
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 8:33:33 PM

wolfram23 said:
Yeah sounds like CPU overheating to me as well. If a GPU overheats it won't beep it'll just BSOD and restart (usually).


Exactly what I've been suspecting. That HP case doesn't appear to even have a front air intake at all (at least not a real one). it's just a bake box. So the CPU is cooling itself with whatever air is pulled into the case by air pressure from outside (and the negative pressure from exhaust fan). The GPU is probably cooking the processor.

Should find him an inexpensive gaming case to put all his equipment inside of. LOL Course he'll have no warranty what so ever though. Granted HP probably won't warranty it now anyhow since the case has been opened.
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 8:39:17 PM

If it does appear to be the CPU thats overheating i would go ahead and return it right away and get a new one before anything else happens.

I would also reccomend getting a new case even if it isn't the CPU overheating.If it's just a heat issue in general,getting a new case is just the better option.
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 8:42:50 PM

purple stank said:
If it does appear to be the CPU thats overheating i would go ahead and return it right away and get a new one before anything else happens.


? You're telling him to return the HP built computer because the video card is making the CPU overheat? Or did I misunderstand?
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 9:05:42 PM

*edited*

I'd say buy a new case and never buy HP again. Yay! :) 
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 9:18:06 PM

wolfram23 said:
BTW... that system only has a 300W PSU. A GTX 470 uses more than that:


OP Said:

Quote:
Hello,
My friend just put a Corsair 850 watt power supply in his HP P6404y machine
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 9:23:12 PM

jerreece said:
OP Said:

Quote:
Hello,
My friend just put a Corsair 850 watt power supply in his HP P6404y machine


D'oh! Long day at work I guess >< *edits post*
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 9:24:08 PM

jerreece said:
? You're telling him to return the HP built computer because the video card is making the CPU overheat? Or did I misunderstand?


Well if it's shutting down to a CPU related overheat the chip could be damaged from it and shorting it's life span.I'm unclear if overheating would start to cause other problems as well.

Just put the orignal PSU that it came with and send it back for a whole new one,or contact AMD and see if they can replace your chip.
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a b Î Nvidia
January 10, 2011 10:48:56 PM

purple stank said:
Well if it's shutting down to a CPU related overheat the chip could be damaged from it and shorting it's life span.I'm unclear if overheating would start to cause other problems as well.

Just put the orignal PSU that it came with and send it back for a whole new one,or contact AMD and see if they can replace your chip.


Doubt it on both counts:

1) AMD won't warranty a CPU sold by a PC distributor. That's the PC distributor's job.

2) HP probably won't accept a return, let alone warranty, on the PC because the case has been opened. They usually put some kind of sticker over the side panel so you have to break the sticker to open the case. That way they know it's been tampered with internally.

If you tell them you want a replacement because it has overheated, they're going to automatically talk about whether you've OverClocked, etc. It might be an uphill battle to get HP to replace the whole PC, let alone just the CPU.

That would be my guess anyhow. But who knows, HP could prove me wrong.
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January 11, 2011 12:05:52 AM

First, thanks Chuck for starting this blog for me.

To start - MY temps in C at idle with only explorer and word running no fan, closed case.
NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 470 GPU - 47c (Speedfan)
CPU TEMP - 46c

(HWmonitor below)
NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 470 power - .88V Value - 1V Max

TMPIN0 37 value - 38max
TMPIN2 20 value - 26max
AMD Phenom II x4 820
Core#0 25 value - 30 max
Core#1 "" "" - ""
Core#2 "" "" - "" ""
Core#4 "" "" - "" ""
Processor power - 32.80 value - 95.40 max

After running Stone Giant for 10 seconds and hitting the buzzer (again closed with no fan) Max temps

CPU temp - 63

TMPIN0 37 value - 40max
TMPIN2 20 value - 27max
AMD Phenom II x4 820
Core#0 25 value - 32 max
Core#1 "" "" - ""
Core#2 "" "" - "" ""
Core#4 "" "" - "" ""
Processor power - 32.80 value - 95.40 max

now with fan on and case open at idle

NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 470 GPU - 39 (Speedfan)
CPU TEMP - 36c

(HWmonitor below)
NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 470 power - .88V Value - .88 Max

TMPIN0 30 value - 30max
TMPIN2 20 value - 20max
AMD Phenom II x4 820
Core#0 25 value - 32 max
Core#1 "" "" - ""
Core#2 "" "" - "" ""
Core#4 "" "" - "" ""
Processor power - 32.80 value - 95.40 max

After running Stone Giant for about 10 seconds and hitting the buzzer open with fan Max temps

CPU temp - 48 at buzz (note that it shot up in 5 secs hitting all the alarms)

TMPIN0 30 value - 31max
TMPIN2 19 value - 27max
AMD Phenom II x4 820
Core#0 25 value - 32 max
Core#1 "" "" - ""
Core#2 "" "" - "" ""
Core#4 "" "" - "" ""
Processor power - 32.80 value - 95.40 max

Question, is it possible that it is viewing how fast the temp goes up expecting that it will fail?









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a b Î Nvidia
January 11, 2011 12:20:19 AM

Can you plz provide screenshots of the HW Monitor at idle and right before you think it will crash.It is way easier to decifer what is actually going on if i can see it with my own eyes.~Please.

Just something to try out,it shouldn't really matter much but, go into your BIOS and turn off AMDKool&Quiet.Unless your really really trying to save money then you won't need it on.
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January 11, 2011 3:27:55 PM

Well we basically have it narrowed down to the CPU overheating. While testing with case closed we saw the CPU temp spike up to 73 degrees Celcius and the machine started the beeps. Not sure if this is a AMD Phenom issue but we keep thinking the CPU should have no major load increase with a better video card, and the GTX 470 video card ejects the vented heat out of the rear of the case, but for now we are working directly on lowering CPU temps. The stock cooler is being replaced by a Spin Q Black widow cooler and once we get that installed and tested we will update you folks with the results. It is a large bugger for sure, as shown below, but hopefully it quickly pulls the heat from processor. As far as a screenshot he keeps trying to post one but for some reason the site won't let him post. We are working on it. Thanks again for all of your insight!!!

Chuck




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January 11, 2011 4:31:34 PM

Well guys, more bad news..... The new heat sink had no effect on the overheat problem. The fins on it were so large he couldn't even put the cover back on the case. So with the side panel of the case off and the new heatsink on he still had the over heat alarms when doing graphic intensive work. We did notice some posts online about problems with the motherboard sharing video memory, and since the new card has DDR5 memory and the shared memory is DDR3 we think the issue is hidden in there somewhere. There is no option in the bios to disable shared memory. For now our next attempt this evening is to swap out an existing GTX260 card I have into his case and see what happens there. The GTX260 used DDR3 and is a much cooler card so something in that combo should work. We will keep you posted. We will also look into upgrading the Northbridge software for the mobo and see if there is somethng possible there. Wish us luck!!

Chuck
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a b Î Nvidia
January 11, 2011 5:34:40 PM

Screenshots of HWMonitor would still be very interesting to see. None of this really makes much sense to me. I'm not so sure this is an overheating issue, at least not the CPU.

I wonder if there's an overheat on the motherboard itself (North/Southbridge for example).
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a b Î Nvidia
January 11, 2011 5:44:06 PM

I think there's supposed to be beep codes. You could try looking them up for your mobo and see if it gives you any info.
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January 11, 2011 5:49:30 PM

The sound is more of a constant tone, no codes. It is very loud and it runs constant until you either quickly exit out of your application and get the temp on the CPU to drop, or it just shuts down the system without any log entry. I still think the voltage is set wrong as shown on that link I posted earlier, and that will be our first shot this evening. Wish us luck!


Chuck

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a b Î Nvidia
January 11, 2011 6:08:57 PM

Voltage is really easy to figure out. Open CPU-Z and it'll show you the voltage for the processor. Then compare this to what AMD shows on their website. It's as easy as that.

If the voltage is too high, you can often times change it in the BIOS, unless HP has a locked BIOS.
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January 11, 2011 6:13:49 PM

That is our plan. I find all kinds of info showing this:

Phenom II X4 820 C2 2.8 GHz 4x 512 KB 4 MB 2 GHz 14x 0.9 - 1.425 95 W AM3 Q3, 2009 HDX820WFK4FGI

Which shows the voltage can be anywhere from 0.9 to 1.425. I guess we start slow at around 1.115 and go up from there based upon Windows boot and stability. Also my fear is that these settings will be locked by HP, but we will give it a go. What a pain but hopefully others can gain insight from me pulling out my hair...LoL


Chuck

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a b Î Nvidia
January 11, 2011 6:20:16 PM

Just load into Windows and run CPU-Z and see what the actual voltage (VCore) is before you monkey with anything. If it's not unreasonable, don't mess with it. I still think you guys should make sure it's not something else overheating. It could be something on the motherboard (if anything is indeed overheating). But HWMonitor will show temps for anything in the system that has a temp monitor built in. This is why a screenshot of HWMonitor is helpful.
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a b Î Nvidia
January 11, 2011 6:20:51 PM

If the voltage is set to 1.425 just lower it to around 1.400.If you go any lower you might have to change the frequency.

Does the computer crash when it beeps or do oyu have to close out of an application for it to stop beeping?

Once again can you plz procide some screenshots of whats happening before and after testing.
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January 11, 2011 6:51:07 PM

The computer will shut down if we don't exit out of the game quick enough. If we exit out as the tone starts we can usually get the CPU to cool down quick enough before the shut down. We will get the screenshot posted tonite.


Chuck

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a b Î Nvidia
January 11, 2011 7:51:21 PM

I just wanted to throw this out their...It is possible that it's just the sensor either by the northbridge or southbrige or anything right above the card that it's getting heated up because the sensor is in a bad spot.It is hazerdous and i dont reccomend it but it's possible to change/turn off the alarm and the fail safe shutdown.But that could be hazderous and fry the computer.Theirs a failsafe installed that if a temperature reads a certain amount it will auto shutdown to save the CPU.You could turn this off to see what happens but it could also fry things.
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January 12, 2011 2:15:32 PM

Well after some intial frustration we decided to take a nite off. The bios is so limited that you cannot change any CPU voltages or settings so the lesson being learned is to just build your own so you can manage your system when you need to. More to come.


Chuck

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a b Î Nvidia
January 12, 2011 2:39:30 PM

chuckberg said:
Well after some intial frustration we decided to take a nite off. The bios is so limited that you cannot change any CPU voltages or settings so the lesson being learned is to just build your own so you can manage your system when you need to. More to come.


Chuck


Good lesson to learn. They prebuilts are generally "ok" until you want to change something lol.

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a b Î Nvidia
January 12, 2011 3:01:35 PM

Like i was saying before,you should put the power supply it came with back in and just send the whole thing back for a refund...
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a b Î Nvidia
January 12, 2011 3:58:20 PM

purple stank said:
Like i was saying before,you should put the power supply it came with back in and just send the whole thing back for a refund...


Good luck with that...
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a b Î Nvidia
January 12, 2011 4:34:39 PM

I used to own a HP back in 2007-2008.Looked like it was the same case as he has.And when i went to go install my geforce 9600gt i didn't see any sticker's on it that would void the warranty if the case was open.Actually now that i think about it,it doesn't make sense for them to have that on the case open if you wanted to install aditonal RAM or a GPU...
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a b Î Nvidia
January 12, 2011 5:02:48 PM

purple stank said:
I used to own a HP back in 2007-2008.Looked like it was the same case as he has.And when i went to go install my geforce 9600gt i didn't see any sticker's on it that would void the warranty if the case was open.Actually now that i think about it,it doesn't make sense for them to have that on the case open if you wanted to install aditonal RAM or a GPU...


Makes sense to me. You pop the case open, cutting that warranty sticker, and insert your RAM upgrade. Inadvertently, you happen to release a static discharge. The system no longer boots. So you remove the RAM and ship it back to HP saying it just died one day. They notice the warranty sticker is cut in half and refuse to warranty the part that's broken.

The reason they would do this is to ensure the system wasn't modified or tampered with (especially by someone who wasn't qualified or who had no idea what they were doing). From a business protection standpoint, it makes a TON of sense to me. Not all products do they need to be so tight with. But everything inside the PC case can potentially be damaged simply by static discharge. It's all fairly sensitive stuff if it gets zapped. So I can totally see why they'd refuse to cover this thing and put a sticker on it to ensure it was never opened.

If HP doesn't do this, and accepts the false warranty claims as a "cost of doing business" then good for them. :)  And for the customers who break their stuff. LOL
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January 12, 2011 5:21:36 PM

jerreece said:
Makes sense to me. You pop the case open, cutting that warranty sticker, and insert your RAM upgrade. Inadvertently, you happen to release a static discharge. The system no longer boots. So you remove the RAM and ship it back to HP saying it just died one day. They notice the warranty sticker is cut in half and refuse to warranty the part that's broken.

The reason they would do this is to ensure the system wasn't modified or tampered with (especially by someone who wasn't qualified or who had no idea what they were doing).


Problem being can you imagine what the inside of the case would look like at the end of a 2 year warranty period if the thing is never cleaned of dust build-up -- systems require routine maintenance - so although I can see them not wanting the case opened that really puts you in a bad position if you live in a dusty environment or have pets rin the house (my system needs to be cleaned out every month or 2 or the temps start to rise due to dust build up here so I cannot imagine leaving it for a couple years !!) - and I'm sure if the system fails due to dust\debris build up inside the case they would try to void the warranty for that as well !!
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a b Î Nvidia
January 12, 2011 5:48:06 PM

JDFan said:
Problem being can you imagine what the inside of the case would look like at the end of a 2 year warranty period if the thing is never cleaned of dust build-up -- systems require routine maintenance - so although I can see them not wanting the case opened that really puts you in a bad position if you live in a dusty environment or have pets rin the house (my system needs to be cleaned out every month or 2 or the temps start to rise due to dust build up here so I cannot imagine leaving it for a couple years !!) - and I'm sure if the system fails due to dust\debris build up inside the case they would try to void the warranty for that as well !!


Totally agree with you! At the same time, I recall a thread on these forums a year or two ago in which a guy fried his system because he used a vacuum cleaner to clean out the dust inside his case. Static electricity from the vacuum killed the system.

Again, it all comes down to HP (or any other PC maker) having to eat the costs for someone tinkering inside the case who doesn't understand what they are doing. Even using an air compressor isn't safe as it can cause moisture issues.

All my point is, is that the manufacturer may choose to put a sticker on the back of the case where the side panel removes so they know if it's ever been opened. And depending on their policies, they may refuse to warranty a product that's been opened due to any number of potential causes for damage to a product someone else did who knows what to.

I'm not saying HP won't fix/replace the OP's system. However I'm saying I would not be at all surprised if they chose not to do so. And I'd understand their reasoning as to why.
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January 12, 2011 6:19:29 PM

Well i do get what your saying,i have seen those stickers on my XFX6870 and i have seen them on Xbox360.I do understand the reason for it being on a GPU or a Console because it would be modding not upgrading/expanding.But with a computer it is more expandability than a mod becuase it was something that is meant to be expanded.
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January 12, 2011 11:37:07 PM

Well...Things go from bad to even worse... HP has locked down the bios so we cannot fix the wrong voltage setting. According to AIDA64 the CPU voltage is set at 1.672 volts and our allowable range was from .09 to 1.425 volts..... We have looked for several software solutions like AMD Overdrive but it doesn't work with this no-name MoBo. The most interesting and similar post we received was on another site and it led us to this :

http://aiscer.wordpress.com/2009/06/26/the-last-remnant...

The info. shown there is exactly where we are, except we cannot underclock the CPU voltage.....Any wanna buy this thing for scrap???


Red Faced Chuck....
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a b Î Nvidia
January 12, 2011 11:43:44 PM

Is it HP that makes the mobo or is that another company?Try going to their website and flashing the bios or download previous or newer versions.

Well if HP installed it wrong, you should defnitly go get a refund.Theirs no way they can accuse you of tampering with it because the BIOS are locked out.

EDIT:If none of the above is possible then get a new mobo.
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January 13, 2011 1:37:15 AM

1.672volts is ridiculous for any CPU. I'm betting anyone you contact @ HP support will have no idea what you're talking about though. Unless they send you up to a higher level Tech Support person.
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January 13, 2011 2:28:58 AM

Well guys.....We have given up. There seems to be no fix for this problem, and we have spent countless hours and money on upgraded gear to try to make this work. We are returning what hardware we can and going back to the old Nvidia 9700 card that atleast runs. Thanks for your efforts, but you can't polish a turd I guess..... BTW Asus makes the Mobo for HP, but brands the board as Pegatron and won't support any bios issues. Also the AMD Overdrive software doesn't even recognize the CPU/Mobo combo and won't run, so you can't use their software solution to modify CPU settings. What a mess.

Chuck
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a b Î Nvidia
January 13, 2011 2:03:33 PM

Wow HP is really screwing you over with this one. Sorry to hear that. I hope you guys can return everything!
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a b Î Nvidia
January 13, 2011 2:30:48 PM

AMD doesn't even recognize the Phenom II X4 820 on their website either. ;) 
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Anonymous
a b α HP
January 13, 2011 2:56:39 PM

Hey guys,

Can you tell me if a 460gtx 1GB can run on my 400W Blue Storm power supply from 2004?

The rest of my components are:
ASRock M3A770DE, AM3
Athlon II X3 450 Triple Core (3.2GHz, 1.5MB L2, 95W, AM3) BOX
2GB DDR3 1333
SATA 320GB WD Blue

Everything will be on standard clocks/voltages.
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January 13, 2011 3:18:48 PM

Quote:
Hey guys,

Can you tell me if a 460gtx 1GB can run on my 400W Blue Storm power supply from 2004?

The rest of my components are:
ASRock M3A770DE, AM3
Athlon II X3 450 Triple Core (3.2GHz, 1.5MB L2, 95W, AM3) BOX
2GB DDR3 1333
SATA 320GB WD Blue

Everything will be on standard clocks/voltages.


I wouldn't chance it ! --- for a few reasons :

1-- PSUs made 6 years ago distributed the power differently (most Wattage went to the +3v and +5v rails instead of the +12v since older systems used more from those rails) so chances are the Amps available on the +12v rails is not going to be enough to run a modern CPU and a 460gtx.

2-- a 6 year old PSU is probably at least starting to show signs of wear which would mean it has less actual power output than it had new -

3-- even a new modern 400W PSU is under the recommended spec for running a 460gtx.

4-- the PSU is one of the parts of a system that controls all of the other parts and is not something you want to cheap out on

Combine those together and it would definitely make doing so a risky proposition since an underpowered PSU can lead to instability and you risk taking other parts of your system with the PSU when it eventually dies from the attempt and even if it works for a few weeks\months you have to worry everytime that you turn the system on if today will be the day it dies and possibly takes the rest of the system with it.

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a b Î Nvidia
January 14, 2011 12:24:09 AM

I agree with JDFan nikolaiy. I wouldn't chance it. Especially since it's not even a quality brand. Plus, at 6-7 years old the thing is probably due to pop.
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