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HP tech support says too much psu is bad

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June 15, 2011 6:46:32 PM

I just spoke to the HP tech support for help with my PSU and they said having too much psu is bad for the computer....so since I have 300 watts that came with pc thats all this motherboard can handle...

this is the first time i've ever heard of this...is it true?

More about : tech support psu bad

a b ) Power supply
June 15, 2011 6:49:01 PM

Hi surag!
are you saying that HP tech support says high power rated is bad for the psu?

Or are you saying having too many power hungry components?
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June 15, 2011 6:57:31 PM

Hmmmmm. While having a PSU much larger than you need is bad, it's because PSUs lose efficiency when they're under-utilized (ie if your system will draw a max of 300w, and on average will use 100w, a 1,000w PSU isn't only overkill, it's going to draw more power from the wall to power the system than a 400-500w PSU.)

However, there's no risk of damage or anything from using "too large" of a PSU. Your motherboard will be fine, it's not going to give it too much power and fry it.
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June 15, 2011 6:58:31 PM

First thank you so much for the speedy reply!

I'll try and clarify-I asked about purchasing a higher power psu-I wanted a 650 watt psu and I currently have a 300 watt psu. They said that 350 watts is the max that my motherboard can handle, any higher and it would fry the mobo...

This sounded absurd to me and I asked for an escalation. I have to wait another 48 hours before a higher up can discuss this with me but the tech lady on the other end said that higher psu will fry my pc. She said I can only have a 350 watt psu

I have never heard this before in my life.

your take?

If you want I can post the pc/mobo info
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June 15, 2011 7:01:00 PM

Dekasav said:
Hmmmmm. While having a PSU much larger than you need is bad, it's because PSUs lose efficiency when they're under-utilized (ie if your system will draw a max of 300w, and on average will use 100w, a 1,000w PSU isn't only overkill, it's going to draw more power from the wall to power the system than a 400-500w PSU.)

However, there's no risk of damage or anything from using "too large" of a PSU. Your motherboard will be fine, it's not going to give it too much power and fry it.



Hi, again thanks for help!

Yea...what you said is what I always thought. if I post my specs can you tell me if its alright?

Currently I have a crappy hd 6450 and was thinking of upgrading to a Nvidia 560 ti (I know there are a few amd cards that are as good or better and cheaper-but a lot of games like batman are optimized for Nvidia for AA and carry some bells and whistles that Nvidia handles better as a result)

Anyway the 560 requires a 600 psu and I was thinking of purchasing a 650 psu.
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a b ) Power supply
June 15, 2011 7:24:15 PM

It wouldnt fry your components because the psu would only use the power of what the components needs.
And efficiency of the psu is dependant on circuit design.

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a b ) Power supply
June 15, 2011 7:25:55 PM

It wouldnt fry your components because the psu would only use the power of what the components needs.
And efficiency of the psu is dependant on circuit design.
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a b ) Power supply
June 15, 2011 7:32:24 PM

^ the exception to that would of course be crappy PSUs, so don't use crappy PSUs :D 
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a c 271 ) Power supply
June 15, 2011 10:17:57 PM

Some how im not surprised that HP tech support doesnt know what they are talking about ......


Okay, here is why it wont fry the board. Computer power supplies are constant voltage sources not constant current sources, so the voltage across the component is the same regardless, but if it needs more power(aka more things turned on) the resistance is lower so more current will flow from the power supply. Both a 1000W power supply and a 300W power supply supply the same voltage to the connector, and on identical motherboards they will both provide the same current at all times, the only things that got changed were in going from AC-DC power, not how the DC arrives at the machine.

In theory you could take a silverstone strider 1500W power supply to power a mini ITX build that needs less than 100W of power and it would work just fine.
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a b ) Power supply
June 15, 2011 10:22:56 PM

It would be bad for your wallet if you don't need it and that probably it. Some higher-output PSUs have dismal efficiency at low loads though.
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a b ) Power supply
June 15, 2011 10:28:09 PM

Talking to HP tech support is bad for the computer.
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a b ) Power supply
June 15, 2011 10:40:42 PM

Why do you need a 650? The only reason I can think of would be a beastly new graphics card, but in a 300W caliber machine? I kinda doubt it. If you're getting a GTX 460 or something, a decent 450 would be plenty, and probably a 380 too. Please elaborate.
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a c 121 ) Power supply
a b α HP
June 16, 2011 12:26:59 AM

The only reason for concern illustrates the HP rep not knowing anything about computer specs. If ALL of a GPU's power had to be delivered through the mobo traces, you could conceivably burn them; but it isn't, the limit is 75W. Any more is delivered through the PCIE power connectors.
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June 19, 2011 4:08:50 PM

kajabla said:
Why do you need a 650? The only reason I can think of would be a beastly new graphics card, but in a 300W caliber machine? I kinda doubt it. If you're getting a GTX 460 or something, a decent 450 would be plenty, and probably a 380 too. Please elaborate.


Hi! Very sorry for my late reply...

I have a 8 gig ram set up, with a athalon x4 quad processor. Currently I have a hd 6450 gfx card. I plan to upgrade to a HD 6970 which recommends minimum 550 watts. I plan to purchase a 27 inch monitor.

Is this alright?
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June 19, 2011 4:09:10 PM

Onus said:
The only reason for concern illustrates the HP rep not knowing anything about computer specs. If ALL of a GPU's power had to be delivered through the mobo traces, you could conceivably burn them; but it isn't, the limit is 75W. Any more is delivered through the PCIE power connectors.



Thanks for advice...this is what I thought too!
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June 26, 2011 12:05:53 AM

Best answer selected by surag.
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a c 121 ) Power supply
a b α HP
June 27, 2011 12:48:36 AM

Thanks. Keep in mind Timop's comment about one too big being bad for your wallet though.
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February 21, 2014 8:51:55 AM

Multiple necroposts removed. Closing.
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