Intel i7 vs amd phenom ii six-core

i can build 1 of these 2 computers since i have a $1000 budget. one computer is a cheaper amd with lots of upgrades, and the other one is an intel i7 with normal components and slightly over budget.

1) AMD

Processor: AMD Phenom(TM) II X6 1065T six-core processor [2.9GHz, 3MB L2 + 6MB L3 shared, up to 4000MHz]
RAM: 12GB DDR3-1066MHz SDRAM [3 DIMMs]
Graphics card: 3GB DDR3 NVIDIA GeForce GT 440 [DVI, HDMI, VGA]

2) INTEL

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2600 quad-core processor with Turbo-Boost [up to 3.8GHz, 8MB cache]
Ram: 6GB DDR3-1333MHz SDRAM [3 DIMMs] from 4GB
Graphics card: 1GB DDR3 Radeon HD 6570 [DVI, HDMI. VGA adapter]

on the computer i will be running Maxon Cinema 4D, sony Vegas pro, photoshop cs5, Boujou 5.0, Adobe After effects cs5, and Minecraft. haha. but i am currently running an i5 intel quad core. the programs run fine but not great. im keeping my i5 but getting a 2nd computer to split up the workload between the 2 computers. these computers i will be buying from hp's website.
5 answers Last reply
More about intel phenom core
  1. Wait for the full on Bulldozer if you can. In the 2 you posted I think i7 wins. With threaded apps like photo shop I think th e6 core phenom might catch up a bit. But if you can wait mine as well wait it out the 3 months and see what the new AMD cpu's have to offer.
  2. The 2500K is almost as good as the 2600K. Are very slight gains worth the extra $100 for you? On $1000, I'd think not.
  3. The i7 2600 is greatly more powerful then the Phenom II. The i5 2500k which matches the Phenom II's cost will also handily beat it in most things except heavily threaded applications, where the hyper threaded i7 2600 would absolutely crush both of them.

    Why are using 6gbs of ram on the Intel setup? You should have a matching set of 2. Right now you can get a 8gb kit, 2x4gb, for under $100 and I'd strongly suggest that.
  4. i agree with the 8gb 2x4gb but hp wont allow me do do that configuration. its not right:/
  5. The first point, DO IT YOURSELF. Don't feed free money to OEM's when needing a desktop. The returns are too minuscule. Plus, 1000$ while building it yourself can fetch you far better components compared to what any of those OEM's can provide. For example, check this out -

    Intel Core i7 2600k
    www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115070

    Asus P8Z68-V
    www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131729

    Corsair 8GB DDR3
    www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233147

    Corsair TX 650W V2
    www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139020

    Seagate Momentus XT 500GB
    www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148591

    Coolermaster 690 II Advanced
    www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119216

    Grand total USD 886.92 (before rebates). I have not included a video card and a optical media. Since you are not into gaming, you can use the HD 3000 video chip available in the 2600k. You can further lowet the overall cost by opting for a H67 based chipset in case you do not require any advantages offered by the Z68 board.
Ask a new question

Read More

CPUs