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With Ethernet Length Harm Signal Quality?

Last response: in Networking
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July 22, 2010 2:34:22 AM

I apologize for this noob question, but I did some searching here and I didn't find much.

I'm considering changing my network set up. And I will need to run a 75 foot cable to my xbox, and another to my PC on the other side of the house. I know that you can run cat6 under 300m and it will function, but I'm wondering if that extra distance will add latency to my signal. When I search tom's hardware most people just want to know about bandwith, but for gaming I'm more concerned about ping.
So will the extra distance add latency or slow my signal at all?
I'll be using cable like this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
My router is a D-Link DIR-615 if it matters.

Also, I plan on running the cable under the floor, which is the ceiling of my basement. Any basic things about this I should know? I searched for an article on here but didn't turn up much. Obviously stay away from electrical cables, but will running it next to a coaxial cable cause interference?

Thanks in advance.
July 22, 2010 3:50:44 PM

I don't think it will be too bad, try to run it on its lonesome but if you're running it next to other cables, particularly heavy electrical carriers like mains wires then try insulating the cable a little more with thick tape or something.

Really, cable length only affects high data amount carriers like HDMI where increased length can mean the difference between 1080 and 720 etc.

Your ping will still be fine as most of it is generated between the router and the distance of the server youre connected to.
July 22, 2010 7:50:38 PM

Yes, extra length adds latency but you won't see a difference.

You didn't say how long the run to your PC would be.

Maximum cable length is 100m not 300m.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_6_cable#Maximum_L...

If you have fluorescent lights avoid them. Like you said stay away from power cables. It's impossible to completely avoid them but keep them seperated when you can. When you do cross power cables, cross them at 90 degrees. Coaxial shouldn't cause you problems.
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July 23, 2010 6:15:27 PM

Thank you for all the replies. The PC cable is also 75ft. The PC and Xbox are in the same room.

As far as fluorescent lights. The ceiling of my basement is filled with them. Will 3-4 feet be enough distance?
And how can you tell if they are interfering? As in what problems will you see occur?
July 23, 2010 6:53:46 PM

frenchbread said:
Will 3-4 feet be enough distance?


That should be fine.
July 25, 2010 2:33:56 AM

electricity travels about the speed of light through a copper wire, so every 1 foot will add ~0.000001ms of latency or every 1 mile(5280 feet) of cable will add an extra ~0.005ms of latency
!