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Could my PSU be causing random shutdowns?

Last response: in Components
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June 21, 2011 9:37:23 PM

I just built a great system, updated every piece of hardware with the latest possible drivers, got all of the windows updates, and I'm occasionally getting random shutdowns (no bsod, no errors. as if I just unplugged the computer) with a restart automatically following shortly after. My full system specs:

mobo: asrock z68 pro
cpu: i5 2500k (turbo boost limited to 4.2 ghz, idles at 35c, never goes over 90c on load)
gpu: gtx 560 ti (oced very slightly while playing games)
ram: G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB
sound card: ASUS XONAR DG 5.1
hdd: Seagate Barracuda ST31000524AS 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s
psu: Rosewill Green Series RG700-S12 700W

Now I'm suspecting it has to do with the PSU (here is what I have if you want to take a closer look: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=17-182-...)

I don't think my cpu is overheating. I've never had a shutdown while playing games yet (I built the system about 3 days ago by the way). It seems that I shutdown at random times. I shutdown twice while screensharing on skype, when I was playing a flash game on the internet, when I was editing some hd footage, browsing the internet, downloading a game on steam, and other random times. Should I return this PSU and get a better one (if the problem is with the PSU)? Thanks. I really feel like I skimped out on the PSU. I regret it.
a b ) Power supply
June 21, 2011 9:48:50 PM

You should monitor your Temp's But yes it could be your PSU. Try speedfan it can monitor your temp's as well as your voltages.
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a b ) Power supply
June 21, 2011 9:51:37 PM

Is there a way you can try another psu and see if the same thing happens? The psu is on the low end side.
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June 22, 2011 9:45:45 AM

All of my temps are normal but I don't know much about the voltages. How can I know if they're abnormal? And no, I do not have an extra PSU. Also, what determines if a PSU is low-end or high-end? I might just have this PSU returned and buy a better one.
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a c 144 ) Power supply
June 22, 2011 10:14:41 AM

Certain brands are known for uniformly good PSU's. Other brands (Corsair is now in this category) have some good lines.

Other brands, CoolerMaster and Rosewill for instance, are sub-par, even if they are really trying with some of their newer lines.

Here's good place to start:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/284314-10-power-sup...
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June 22, 2011 1:26:26 PM

I've not heard of Rosewill before, but if its a cheapo PSU, my money is on the PSU. A new more reliable PSU can be got for around £80.
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June 22, 2011 1:28:07 PM

Also check the volatge rates for each rail on your PSU.
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June 22, 2011 7:17:37 PM

The shutdowns are pretty rare now. If it bothers me more I guess I'll have it exchanged for a better one. But you guys are sure that the issue is with the PSU and nothing else right? I do not know how nor do I have the tools to test the voltage of the PSU though.
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Best solution

a c 1167 ) Power supply
June 22, 2011 8:56:05 PM

There is an inherent problem with the Rosewill 80Plus Green Series RG700-S12. It has ripple suppression on the +12 Volt rail that is out of spec (i.e. above the maximum 120 mV allowed).

The random shutdowns you are having is a symptom of that high ripple.

High ripple will accelerate the degradation of the capacitors on your motherboard's and graphics card's power VRM circuits eventually leading to their failure.
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June 22, 2011 11:33:40 PM

ko888 said:
There is an inherent problem with the Rosewill 80Plus Green Series RG700-S12. It has ripple suppression on the +12 Volt rail that is out of spec (i.e. above the maximum 120 mV allowed).

The random shutdowns you are having is a symptom of that high ripple.

High ripple will accelerate the degradation of the capacitors on your motherboard's and graphics card's power VRM circuits eventually leading to their failure.


Damn. So you're saying I should replace the PSU ASAP? Thanks for the info.

Does this seem good enough?: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=17-139-...
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a c 1167 ) Power supply
June 23, 2011 12:35:22 AM

toiletninja said:
Damn. So you're saying I should replace the PSU ASAP? Thanks for the info.

Does this seem good enough?: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=17-139-...

That is the recently discontinued model. Corsair is just clearing out the inventory for that model that is still in the distribution channel.

It's been replaced by the Version 2 model CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX650 V2 650W ATX12V v2.31/ EPS12V v2.92 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC High Performance Power Supply for the same $89.99 price as the old one.

The V2 model has higher efficiency and far lower noise and ripple levels than the old one.
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June 23, 2011 2:47:01 AM

So you think that could handle the i5 2500k @ 4.4 ghz, slightly oced gtx 560 ti, 1 optical drive, 1 hdd, and around 4 case fans? Thanks.
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a c 1167 ) Power supply
June 23, 2011 3:47:56 AM

A GeForce GTX 560 Ti has a graphics card power of 170 Watts. This means that the graphics card itself may draw up to 14.2 Amps from the +12 Volt rail.

For a single GeForce GTX 560 Ti graphics card system NVIDIA recommends a power supply with 500 Watts or greater with a +12 Volt continuous current rating of 30 Amps and with at least two 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors.

The Corsair Enthusiast Series TX650 V2 (CMPSU-650TXV2) with its +12 Volt continuous current rating of 53 Amps is way more than enough to power your single GeForce GTX 560 Ti graphics card system with plenty in reserve for overclocking the CPU and GPU and the addition of more peripherals.
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June 30, 2011 12:13:54 AM

Best answer selected by toiletninja.
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