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What happens when i disable a core in a multi core processor?

hi all,

I have a multi core processor (phenom ii x4 955 BE 3.2 Ghz). I want to work in a software which does not support multi processing.

I know I can disable cores. my question is, whether disabling a core will add its resources to remaining core ( i mean if i use only one core, will my using core's speed become 3.2 x 4 =12.8?)

Please help me know it.

I am a noob in this stuff and sorry for my poor English.

Thanks,

Nishanth
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about what disable core multi core processor
  1. Best answer
    Disabling 1 or more cores does NOT add its resources to the remaining core(s).
  2. No.

    In Sandy Bridge, running fewer cores allows the remaining cores to run a little bit faster. Not double the speed, but rather a few increments faster; from 3.4GHz to 3.7GHz, for example.
  3. compulsivebuilder said:
    No.

    In Sandy Bridge, running fewer cores allows the remaining cores to run a little bit faster. Not double the speed, but rather a few increments faster; from 3.4GHz to 3.7GHz, for example.


    Really? I guess that makes some sense. Is this with or without overclocking?
  4. Newest AMD CPUs do this to. You don't have to disable anything however, it's automatic.
  5. deadcells said:
    Really? I guess that makes some sense. Is this with or without overclocking?


    Yes. On Sandy Bridge systems you can only over-clock by adjusting the multipliers. You can adjust the base multiplier, and (sometimes) the size of the steps for the Turbo Boost.

    BTW: the Turbo Boost depends mainly on temperatures. The cooler that you keep the CPU, the longer the Turbo Boost will run before it slows down.
  6. Best answer selected by nishanth2050.
  7. I suspect (but don't really know) that there may be some benefit in certain applications -- but it would be very difficult to quantify.

    You would simply have fewer cores sharing the L3, and this would be a boost. You might want to check something like single-thread CineMarks between PhII X2s & X4s at the same clocks.

    What you essentially would be showing is that even cores at rest may have flushed enough of something into the L3 to ding performance slightly -- but it's a little misleading, as the AMD arch seems to get diminishing returns from piling on the L3.

    In other words -- adding 10% more L3 gets you a 5% boost in performance; and adding 20% more L3 might get you a 7.5% increase in performance.
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