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H 67 Vs Z 68

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February 29, 2012 10:49:28 AM

Hello,
I want to assemble a desktop essentially for home use and for movie conversion from one format to another. In addition I want to be able to record video from cable TV. What is the best configuration for me.

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a b Ĉ ASUS
a b V Motherboard
February 29, 2012 12:35:52 PM

No brainer - The Z68 (w/an I5-3500k)

On MB. Two major advantages, both of witch will speed up video encoding:
(1) Video encoding can take advantage of the two GPUs - the iGPU and the dGPU (requires a dedicated GPU) - Google quicksync and luid software)
(2) a mild OC to 4.2 GHz is so simple a caveman can do it and is down to almost a one-button push. encoding is CPU intensive also so the Boost in GHz helps.
February 29, 2012 12:49:16 PM

Z68 is a must for video encoding lol

RetiredChief said:
No brainer - The Z68 (w/an I5-3500k)

On MB. Two major advantages, both of witch will speed up video encoding:
(1) Video encoding can take advantage of the two GPUs - the iGPU and the dGPU (requires a dedicated GPU) - Google quicksync and luid software)
(2) a mild OC to 4.2 GHz is so simple a caveman can do it and is down to almost a one-button push. encoding is CPU intensive also so the Boost in GHz helps.
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Anonymous
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b V Motherboard
March 1, 2012 2:49:00 AM

Veekay10 said:
Hello,
I want to assemble a desktop essentially for home use and for movie conversion from one format to another. In addition I want to be able to record video from cable TV. What is the best configuration for me.


it depends on if you are going to overclock your cpu and/or if you want an ssd for caching to speed up your system. a Z68 mother has features that would enable you to do both.

as far as video encoding, it would depend on the software you are using and if it enables quicksync. if it does not then overclocking your cpu would help. (z68)

if it does support quicksync then there are three different configurations that would make a difference:

1) you are using one monitor with the igpu (onboard) then either the z68 or h67 would take advantage of quicksync.

2) you are using a discrete graphics card with one monitor, you would need to use lucid virtu on the z68 to take advantage of quicksync.

3) you are using two monitors, one on the discrete and on on the igpu, then either the z 68 or h67 would take advantage of quicksync.
Anonymous
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b V Motherboard
March 1, 2012 2:51:22 AM

maxinexus said:
Z68 is a must for video encoding lol


useful, yes. must, no.
a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 328 V Motherboard
March 1, 2012 3:36:29 AM

Veekay10 said:
Hello,
I want to assemble a desktop essentially for home use and for movie conversion from one format to another. In addition I want to be able to record video from cable TV. What is the best configuration for me.

Well, I think that RetiredChief said pretty much what is needed : )



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Couple of more things about the Z68...
I would go with Z68 because the features.
There are 3 major differences between the P67 and the Z68.

Intel SRT (Smart Response Technology) lets you to use a small SSD (<50GB) to work as a caching drive to speed up the boot, start up of apps and access times.

IGP Support (Integrated Graphics on Processor) the Z68 boards have build in support for the IGP. The main advantages of this is that it will allow you to use the IGP for things like backup graphics and help with trouble shooting issues. Also with the Lucid Logix Virtu software you switch between the IGP and the dedicated video card for the best performance for the application that you are running.

Intel SATA III controller is better performing then the old Marvell controller that is used on the P67 boards.

Z68 is also great overclocker!

Z68 is Ivy Bridge compatible. H67 and P67. H61 is not.

Those are the differences between the Z68 and the P67and H67.
Anonymous
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b V Motherboard
March 1, 2012 4:02:40 AM

nikorr said:

Z68 is going to be Ivybridge compatible. H67 and P67. H61 is not.


i beg your pardon.
http://event.asus.com/2011/mb/PCIe3_Ready/
* Available model list with future 22nm CPU ready.
a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 328 V Motherboard
March 1, 2012 4:04:43 AM

Anonymous said:
i beg your pardon.
http://event.asus.com/2011/mb/PCIe3_Ready/
* Available model list with future 22nm CPU ready.

I know, it needs to be updated : )

Thanx for bringing this to my attention.
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b V Motherboard
March 1, 2012 11:21:54 AM

H67
Introduced along with the P67 chipset at launch is the H67 chipset.

Each Socket 1155 CPU all have in built graphics, and to be able to utilise that embedded graphics card the motherboard must have a video output such as a VGA, DVI or HDMI port. All H67 motherboard have at least one video output so that the CPU GPU can be used. Whilst this is a great feature it is worth noting the integrated graphics are not much cop and only really suited to HD video playback and very basic gaming. The main advantage of this is to eliminate the need for a small sub £30 graphics card and to bring down the overall cost of a workstation PC or media Centre that does not require a dedicated graphics card. The H67 like all the other chipsets does support dedicated graphics cards too, so should the need to add a higher end graphics card arise, it is a straight forward procedure.

The downside of a H67 chipset is it supports very limited overclocking even if an unlocked ‘K’ Series CPU (i5 2500K & i7 2600K) is installed. To the overclockers, this is a completely no go chipset, but for everyone building a sandy bridge system on a budget it makes a great choice.
P67
The P67 chipset was also available at the launch of the Sandy Bridge CPU. The upside of this chipset is it supports the option of running two dedicated graphics cards in SLI or Crossfire and the option to overclock K series CPU’s.

The downside is not being able to support the integrated graphics on the CPU so a dedicated graphics card is a must. It makes it a popular choice for the enthusiast and gamer.
Z68
Launched 5 months after the P67 and H67 chipset the Z68 chipset combines the advantages of the H67 and P67 Chipset so that overclocking, dual dedicated graphics cards and use of the integrated CPU graphics is available. Whilst on the surface it would seem that this would be the chipset to go for, how many users that have 2 dedicated graphics cards will actually want to use the onboard graphics when they already have 2 more powerful graphics cards in their system anyway?

The only real advantage is for users that wish to access the HD graphics features such as quick sync, but considering it’s only supported by very few transcoding programs and there are not many people out there that need or will want to transcode, it makes it almost pointless to choose Z68 over a P67 chipset.

Same applies to users that want to overclock the CPU but use the onboard graphics card; it’s a very limited market.

Finally, another feature of a Z68 chipset is known as SSD caching which is where it allows the use of a small (say 10 or 20 GB) Solid state hard drive to act as a cache for a larger ‘traditional’ hard disk. If you are already planning the use of a Solid State drive this feature is redundant.

If you can’t afford a decent size SSD (40GB+) then there are more cost effective ways around using a small SSD and SSD cashing like spending less on a motherboard, (H67 chipset or even a P67 chipset) and putting the saved money into a decent size SSD.
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