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Confused

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  • Monitors
  • Product
Last response: in Motherboards
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February 29, 2012 3:11:08 PM

Hi guys,

Building up my computer but stuck between two motherboards coz couple of things about specs made me confused:

http://uk.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=4...

and

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z6...

While Asus mb has HDMI and DVI ports, Giagabyte mb has only HDMI port. My question is that if I go for Gigabyte then there will be no DVI port and does that mean I won’t be able to use a monitor with analog/DVI out only?

Secondly, can I use a monitor that has only analog port with those mbs mentioned above? Would you recommend such monitor?

Just one more question, it is about virtu. In Asus web page:

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z6...

it says: “Its GPU virtualization dynamically assigns tasks to the best available graphics resources based on power, performance and system load on Windows® 7 based PCs.”

What I understand from this statement is that I cannot use this virtu thing with xp or linux. Or am I mistaken?

Thanks

More about : confused

a c 717 V Motherboard
February 29, 2012 4:22:19 PM

Most monitors have D-Sub (VGA) and DVI-D, fewer have HDMI. Remember HDMI is both video and audio and when used most MOBO's turn-off the on-board audio. You can get and adapter HDMI-to-DVI-D, but no audio.

The D-Sub (VGA) is analog the others (DVI-D and HDMI) are digital, you can get an DVI-D-to-D-Sub adapter.

IMO - get the ASUS and have all your options open, and it's a better MOBO anyway.

Neither of the MOBO's mentioned are good for a Sandy Bridge K (unlocked) CPU.

As far as Lucid Virtu Software it only runs on Windows 7, but as far as other Applications Quick Sync support that depends on the Application. I know Linux isn't supported.

Related resources
February 29, 2012 6:30:15 PM

jaquith said:
Most monitors have D-Sub (VGA) and DVI-D, fewer have HDMI. Remember HDMI is both video and audio and when used most MOBO's turn-off the on-board audio. You can get and adapter HDMI-to-DVI-D, but no audio.


What do you exactly mean by this? Do you mean when I use mobo's on-board gpu there will be no audio (sound)?


Quote:
Neither of the MOBO's mentioned are good for a Sandy Bridge K (unlocked) CPU.


I'm not quite into all this tech stuff, so would you be kind to explain this in a plain language?


Quote:
with the gigabyte mobo you would have to get something like this.. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6812270286


Do you think using such adaptor would affect the data transfer quality?
a c 717 V Motherboard
February 29, 2012 7:12:08 PM

I thought this was pretty clear:
Quote:
Remember HDMI is both video and audio and when used most MOBO's turn-off the on-board audio.

HDMI is meant for a 'TV' Video + Audio. If you're using a 'PC Monitor' then use: 1. DVI-D, or 2. D-Sub (VGA).

Unless you are purchasing a Sandy Bridge: i5-2500K, i7-2600K or i7-2700K (as of today) then Phases and OC'ing doesn't pertain.

You copy/pasted a link, good news I know NewEgg's numbering; No, I won't use a BYTECC DVI-HM DVI Male to HDMI Female Cable Adaptor.

Recommended:
Computer Monitor = DVI-D and separate speakers.
Computer Monitor (integrated speakers) = HDMI <or> DVI-D + stereo jack (from: MOBO or Sound Card)

TV = HDMI using the TV's own speakers
Older TV = Depending on the TV's inputs - DVI-D <or> D-Sub (VGA) + stereo jack (from: MOBO or Sound Card)
TV + Receiver = HDMI to Receiver

Both DVI-D and HDMI are digital sources and the only degradation is from excessive cable lengths and not the adapters.
March 1, 2012 3:18:40 PM

Nice info, thanks for that and glad you know NewEgg's numbering...
!