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I5 2500k temps

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June 28, 2011 6:12:41 AM

I recently about two weeks ago got an i5 2500k and paired it with a MSI p67-gd65 in a HAF 922. I'm having some issues with the temps, especially in the new click BIOS. It idles anywhere from 23-32c and is currently at 27c and has crept up 3 degrees since I turned the computer on. Under load with max settings in Black Ops it gets to 60-65c and about 70c in Medal of Honor. I monitor these with MSI control center by pressing alt+tab in game to check them. I do not have it overclocked.

While the temperatures when gaming are decent, when I go into the click BIOS things seem to go very wrong. As soon as I get in to the BIOS, it says my CPU temp is 81c. After that, it slowly creeps up to 97c and that's where it stops. I know BIOS puts the CPU under load, but temps of 97c seems insanely high. So can anyone explain to me why I'm getting these readings and what can I do about them?

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June 28, 2011 7:15:42 AM

Did you use thermal compound between the heatsink and the chip? Is your fan spinning at the correct RPMs? What is the ambient temp of the case?
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June 28, 2011 7:32:09 AM

Right now my system temp on MSI afterburner is 32c. The temperature in my apartment is 68f. I'm using the stock cooler and the thermal paste that comes pre-applied.
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June 28, 2011 7:45:02 AM

morrise001 said:
I recently about two weeks ago got an i5 2500k and paired it with a MSI p67-gd65 in a HAF 922. I'm having some issues with the temps, especially in the new click BIOS. It idles anywhere from 23-32c and is currently at 27c and has crept up 3 degrees since I turned the computer on. Under load with max settings in Black Ops it gets to 60-65c and about 70c in Medal of Honor. I monitor these with MSI control center by pressing alt+tab in game to check them. I do not have it overclocked.

While the temperatures when gaming are decent, when I go into the click BIOS things seem to go very wrong. As soon as I get in to the BIOS, it says my CPU temp is 81c. After that, it slowly creeps up to 97c and that's where it stops. I know BIOS puts the CPU under load, but temps of 97c seems insanely high. So can anyone explain to me why I'm getting these readings and what can I do about them?



are you SURE that your readings in BIOS are Celsius?
I ask because 97 <Fahrenheit> would be about 36 Celsius which would make sense for idle temp

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June 28, 2011 8:15:59 AM

BIOS putting the CPU under load is a new information to me. For all I know, the least temps are observed when in BIOS. Only after a strenous gaming session if you immediately go into BIOS, it will show some high temps which should gradually go down and not up. I assume there is something wrong with the monitoring system/software. On the hardware front, does your case has adequate airflow? The stock Intel coolers are not very good. Getting a cheap aftermarket cooler (like a CM Hyper 212+) and some good thermal paste (like AS) will surely give better temps.
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June 28, 2011 9:14:20 AM

I just did a reboot to enter bios double check and the temperatures are in celsius. When I first opened BIOS the temp was 70c and was up to 80c in about 30 seconds if that and steadily climbing, same as always while the system temp said 32c. My case is currently just running the 3 stock fans, 230mm front intake, 230mm top exhaust, and 120mm rear exhaust. I know stock coolers aren't the greatest things in the world, but shouldn't it be good enough for a non-overclocked system?
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June 28, 2011 12:37:10 PM

heatsink installed correctly? 97c is crazy temp, disable anything in bios limited cpu fan speed, usually like smart fan control or similar. this bumps fan to max. it will help.

Also check that your mobo aint auto volting and increasing temp .

Recommend getting an aftermarket cooler
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June 28, 2011 5:26:51 PM

when in bios and temp going up does your fans increase speed?
when in windows monitoring try using prime95 and monitor temps under load
See if your fans speed up under load in Windows
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June 28, 2011 6:01:35 PM

The temps in the BIOS will always be higher because the CPU cannot go into low-power idle mode until it fully boots into Windows. The CPU is running at full speed in the BIOS, and the temps will increase up to a certain point and then stabilize.

It shouldn't get anywhere near 97ºC in the BIOS if the CPU isn't overclocked. It should be more like 60-65ºC with the stock cooler. Your gaming temps shouldn't be that high either. That signals to me that the heat sink is not properly installed or the fan isn't working right. Either that or the CPU voltage is much higher than it should be.
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June 28, 2011 10:08:33 PM

BIOS says the core voltage 1.192 while MSI control center says Vcore is .944 at the home screen. All fans are at 100%. Could part of the problem be the lack of intake fans? I'll start prime95 and let it run for a few hours and use realtemp to monitor it and see what it says.
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June 28, 2011 10:23:55 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
The temps in the BIOS will always be higher because the CPU cannot go into low-power idle mode until it fully boots into Windows. The CPU is running at full speed in the BIOS, and the temps will increase up to a certain point and then stabilize.

It shouldn't get anywhere near 97ºC in the BIOS if the CPU isn't overclocked. It should be more like 60-65ºC with the stock cooler. Your gaming temps shouldn't be that high either. That signals to me that the heat sink is not properly installed or the fan isn't working right. Either that or the CPU voltage is much higher than it should be.



^+1 Great post - good advice
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June 29, 2011 1:06:04 AM

morrise001 said:
BIOS says the core voltage 1.192 while MSI control center says Vcore is .944 at the home screen. All fans are at 100%. Could part of the problem be the lack of intake fans? I'll start prime95 and let it run for a few hours and use realtemp to monitor it and see what it says.

Okay, so we've eliminated any voltage issue -- 1.2v is the default voltage for Sandy Bridge CPUs at load, and 0.944v is in the acceptable range for low-power idle mode in Windows.

As to ventilation: The HAF 922 case has good airflow even if you only use the stock fans that come with it, so that shouldn't be an issue. The ambient temp of your apartment is also acceptable.

That leaves two things: Either the heat sink isn't mounted correctly, or the CPU fan isn't spinning at the speed it's supposed to be.

Was there a piece of clear plastic covering the thermal compound (to protect it) when you took the heat sink out of the package? If there was, did you remove it before mounting the heat sink?

If you take the right side panel off of the case, you should be able to see the back of the mainboard through a big hole in the tray. Do you see all four of the white heat sink mounting "heads" poking through the mainboard? Do each of those white heads have a black pin in the middle?
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June 29, 2011 1:55:26 AM

All the heatsink push pins were through the motherboard, but two of them were not completely secure. After securing BIOS was reading 52c. I guess I should've checked that first. I'm still new to building computers though. After about 5 minutes now of prime95, realtemp has gone from reading 95-97c like it was earlier to around 65c while MSI control center is reading about 50c. Which one should I rely on more?
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June 29, 2011 3:02:59 AM

Good -- I'm glad you got that fixed.

I think Core Temp and Real Temp give the most accurate readings. They give core temps from the built-in digital sensors in each CPU core. To get more accurate load temps, run Prime95 for about an hour. That will make sure the temps have stabilized.
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June 29, 2011 3:08:16 AM

Realtemp read a max of 51c during 3 games of Black Ops. Thanks for the help!
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June 29, 2011 3:08:33 AM

Best answer selected by morrise001.
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