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Reading through Chapter 3 of the Asus online manual for P8Z68VPro/Gen3

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March 2, 2012 12:05:53 PM

Hello All:

I am currently reading the online manual for the Asus P8Z68-V-Pro/Gen3.
I am new to learning about building a computer on my own.

Having some computer experience in my past, but not on the hardware end of things, the process of learning the lingo of our computer engineers has been quite a challenge for me. :??:  I am moving along somewhat slowly but at a steady forward pace. So many things need to be understood and defined. I'm doing the best I can from online research and study.

Having you all here is much appreciated.

That being said, I am beginning to fear setting things in the BIOS for the MB (described above). I wonder if they tell you how to make the many choices you need to make in the BIOS.

Currently, I've managed to read and study up to section 3-7, page 73 of 146, in the online manual. The subject being covered now is: 3.4 Ai Tweaker menu.
There seem to be so many things I've got to set correctly. I'm kind of worried I'll set something wrong. I get that I can set things to Auto on many settings. But I still wonder about doing this correctly.

My learning goal is to get a moderate understanding of what this MB is all about and it's capabilities, etc. Again, it's been a slow process for me because I've been researching the meaning of the computer jargon used and what things mean or do.

This stuff is complicated indeed. I've all ready gone through a a few packages of Oreo's and other snacks. You know it's good for staying level headed and not getting too frustrated in the learning process. Also, I can only take so much of this stuff in at a time. Certainly, you pros out there must know what I'm talking here. Here's hoping I've made you smile.

Continuing, however, can you understand my overall concern? I mean I'm gonna wind up getting this MB, this powerful piece of electronic capabilities and I just wanna know I can set it up one time for my general business and personal use properly.

Here's something very interesting: When I was learning about XMP, I came across the following:
(Refer to: http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/gaming-co... )
Note: There are also two video demos using XMP at the above site for a comparison between an SSD and HDD.

I was seriously impressed with what I saw on those two brief videos about SSD. I can't wait to experience this for myself. I just have to tell you people about this. Go look for yourself.

Anyway, using the above reference, as an example, this is why I am concerned about getting my settings in the BIOS right. If I can't do that correctly then getting to experience that SSD stuff--well I don't know.

I am going build a computer rig. It's gonna take me time to get my understanding of things up to speed, but I'll get there.

Hopefully you'll be able to infer the overall question which this post is driving at, and you'll be able get me past some of my immediate concerns.

Thanks, Have a great day! or Night!

More about : reading chapter asus online manual p8z68vpro gen3

a b Ĉ ASUS
a b V Motherboard
March 2, 2012 12:38:37 PM

Building your computer is actually a simple process. the other things in the manual youve been reading up on (Which isnt a bad idea) is for the enthusiasts looking to Overclock, set up RAID's and so many more beyond those just starting out. The only thing you need to know is how to set up the Optical drive as primary boot up, then install windows, then after windows is installed you must go back into bios and set your Hard drive with the Operation system as primary boot up (For fastest boot up times) But if you just don't feel like going back to the bios, you can leave the optical drive as primary boot because after BIOS logo the computer will search for a bootable OS through every component
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a b Ĉ ASUS
a b V Motherboard
March 2, 2012 12:56:59 PM

You shouldn't NEED to go in the BIOS unless you have a problem. Everything should be on auto out of the box and it should work. Most of the choices in the BIOS are for overclocking and other advanced things which you do not need to worry about unless you want to. Reading the motherboard manual isn't really going to help with BIOS settings because the associated computer experience that backs up knowing what the settings actually do aren't in there. The one thing you would want to set is AHCI mode for the SATA controller if you will be using an SSD.

My point here being don't stress out about it. Building a PC is relatively easy. Everything can only go in one spot. There are forums here were people are more than happy to suggest parts and review your build. There are stickies with instructions on assembling them around here somewhere. If you have a problem you can ask questions here (please for the love of god though google first someone has had your problem and fixed it already i guarantee you). The best option would be to have a friend who knows what they are doing help you assemble it, it would be far more educational than studying the motherboard manual. but if you don't know someone you can figure it out.
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a b V Motherboard
March 2, 2012 12:59:21 PM

^ So true! As a beginner you don't want (or need) to be messing around with the BIOS settings. The folks who build these things have all types of users in mind, especially beginners. If you will be building it from scratch, you have to know what components to buy, so compatibility is most important. Choose your compnents according to the role the build will have in everyday use. Be sure all components work with eachother and you'll be fine.
Most motherboards have setting profiles you can choose from without having to study a week for. You can usually find options to set the motherboard to Default Settings (fail-safe), Optimized Settings or settings like "Enhanced". They will "juice up" your system without any fuss.
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March 2, 2012 1:17:37 PM

Thanks. I got a handle on much of what all three of the current responses are saying. However, I still want to proceed through this complex manual of information. I feel more comfortable learning about things, even if it is very challenging and time consuming. You'll see, I'm gonna do this. I will build a system to meet my needs which at this point will be both business and personal use.

You folks need to understand that one thing seems to lead into another. Since this computer hardware stuff is so interesting, it's like taking candy away from a baby to say it's not really necessary to understand all about the BIOS in the manual. I mean, originally, I really kindof shyed away from getting involved with the overclocking stuff, etc. But you kind of get sucked into it the more you explore things. And I like to chop on my Tootsie Rolls and Oreos, etc.

Look this MB has this thing called DIGI VRM. It's a primary feature of this MB. How can you not wanna know what it does? Same for the TPU and EPU. I've got a basic handle on these items from the overall marketing write up on this MB. But some of the stuff in the manual takes time to understand.

More on this in the future. Got to go now. Thank you.

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March 2, 2012 5:19:34 PM

Lotus100 said:


Look this MB has this thing called DIGI VRM. It's a primary feature of this MB. How can you not wanna know what it does? Same for the TPU and EPU. I've got a basic handle on these items from the overall marketing write up on this MB. But some of the stuff in the manual takes time to understand.



I, too, find that manual seriously lacking. It tells the user how to set up a particular capability, but it doesn't tell you what it is. DIGI VRM is a case in point.
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March 2, 2012 10:53:44 PM

eXistenZ said:
I, too, find that manual seriously lacking. It tells the user how to set up a particular capability, but it doesn't tell you what it is. DIGI VRM is a case in point.


Thank you for your acknowledgement. Certainly you can understand how difficult it is for me trying to make sense of what is in that manual. It has been and continues to be a major learning experience for me, perhaps all.
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March 3, 2012 5:23:21 AM

Example of my overall questioning in this thread:

Look at section 3-8, pages 74-76 (top third of page) which stops at DIGI+ VRM

Now here's my points of concern:
1. Looking at the Ai Overclock Tuner [Auto]: I can see the three settings possible here. It is clear that I can set this to [Auto]. If I do so then I've got nothing else to worry about in this setting. However, if I choose [Manual] then I'm lost here. Because there's no eductional instruction from Asus from what will be acceptable setting when choosing this option. Oh, I know there must be stuff on the web (via Google, etc.), but the point is if this option is chosen then the other items are also effected by this choice too. And that's where things can get a bit confusing.

2. Looking at the BCLK/PCIE Frequency [XXX]: Asus tell us the values possible, but how does this effect the system performance? Does it make the system work faster? What effect will this setting have on the heat experience of my build? What level of cooling is recommended with the various settings? How will other components of the system build be effected by the various choices made with the recommended range for the BCLK/PCIE Frequency choice?

3. With: XMP [High Performance]
See how the Ai Overclock Tuner choice ripples down to this choice. Well that's fine with me, but how do I know if XMP is supported by my DIMM? I am assuming that Profile #1 or #2 are configurations for the DIMM itself? There's also the concern that if I didn't select for the Ai Overclock Tuner choice [Auto], because I've selected the XMP option, then I'll lose the affect of the [Auto] option and have to set all the other options properly within the Ai Tweaker Menu. This is a cause of concern. Why? Because I wanna do things correctly and because I've learnt that XMP is a preferred form of memory, which makes me wanna use it.

4. With Turbo Ratio [By All Cores]: I think I can choose [Auto] without worrying about my not choosing [Auto] for the Ai Overclock Tuner choice?
And, get this, if I select [By Per Core (Cannot Adjust in OS)], then why do I want the cores to be set differently in the Turbo ratio? What is the purpose of doing this? Am I just controlling four cores with this [By Per Core] option for this MB? Or are there more than four cores? (My online research says that a computer can have more than four cores. Refer to: Wikipedia's reference to multi-core processor.) (And I think when they say: "OS" they're refering to your Operating System, right?)

5. With Internal PLL Overvoltage [Auto]: This seem quite important as a safety measure against any overclocking mistakes that you can make by accident or on purpose. What are my setting options if I enable this selection? I assume [Auto] is the default value for this option? Again, if I choose [Auto] here then is it independent of choosing [Auto] for the
Ai Overclock Tuner choice?

6. At Memory Frequency [Auto]: Okay, I think this just refers to the memory, not the PCIE Frequency above. But they seem to work in conjunction with each other, that is with the BCLK/PCIE Frequency setting above? So, how does this work? Note: Asus' warning about the possibility of system unstability.

7. Now at iGPU Max. Frequency [XXXX]: The integration of the GPU and Northbridge CPU speed is measured in MHz. Well, if that's correct then what's safe for this setting? How will it affect the other computer components of the system?

8.With the EPU Setting set to [Enabled]: How is my system effected by the various options? When set to [Light PSM] the system will probably get hotter than with [Max PSM], so what kind of chassis fans are recommended? Even selecting the [Auto] option here, the system can get heated, so why doesn't Asus recommend the best type of cooling for the various settings? What happens to the speed of computer processing results when using this option?

9. At OC Tuner: Doesn't the option conflict with earlier options above like XMP and Turbo Ratio?

10. With DRAM Timing Control: What are the sub-items? How do they affect what I selected above for the other options like XMP and Memory Frequency [Auto]?

11. Now at CPU Power Managment: Doesn't this conflict with the EPU Power Saving Mode? What is the benefit of the Enhanced Intel(r) Intel SpeedStep Technology? How are they defining "specific condition(s)" in the Turbo Mode? And what do the five options on the top of page 76 do?

Finally, if the system freezes [which I believe is defined as a crash--(Please correct me if I am wrong about the definition of a crash?)--and I have to follow the manual instruction to: "Changing the values in this menu may cause the system to become unstable! If this happens, revert to the default settings." Well, if the system freezes up or crashes then I think I'll have to restart my system. That will allow me to reset the option to default. Am I correct here? I'm concerned about getting stuck if this happens.

Well, I'm sure by now you can understand the complexity of my question? Thank you


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a b V Motherboard
March 4, 2012 2:43:14 PM

Hi Lotus100

As requested... taking a look at your thread.... wow... I think you are overthinking it... the advice from unksol is spot on :) 

Start out with default/auto settings..... make sure its stable... then you can start to tweak when you are more comfortable and can do it in a controlled fashion.

Good luck... post back when you have it set up and let us know how you got on

Cheers

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March 4, 2012 3:20:43 PM

Quickly looking at previous post, general idea is "doesn't this conflict with that"?

Yes. But I think the idea is "supersedes".

When I first got mine, then thing rebooted. Until I "read the instructions" and set it to XMP for my XMP memory. Thing ran great. Then I accidently hit Ai OC and it changed a bunch of things in UEFI. But many of the settings automatically set by XMP mode remained. When I wanted to un-OC, I reset to XMP. So yes, when AiOC-ed, XMP mode changed to manual, for example.
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a c 717 V Motherboard
March 4, 2012 3:39:42 PM

Lotus100 said:
Hopefully you'll be able to infer the overall question which this post is driving at, and you'll be able get me past some of my immediate concerns.

Thanks, Have a great day! or Night!

No, I wasn't able to crystal ball your question(s)?!

The initial settings in your BIOS can be as simple as AI Overclock Tuner -> XMP, and all SATA -> AHCI (default on most P67/Z68).

The only changes I make to the BIOS installing Windows are SATA-> (AHCI or RAID), install the OS and then after initial testing -- BASE SCORE and burn-in -- then I make changes to the AI Overclock Tuner. Other initial changes might include changes to the CPU_header IF connecting a pump to that header.
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a c 717 V Motherboard
March 4, 2012 3:44:59 PM

Lotus100 said:
Look this MB has this thing called DIGI VRM. It's a primary feature of this MB. How can you not wanna know what it does? Same for the TPU and EPU. I've got a basic handle on these items from the overall marketing write up on this MB. But some of the stuff in the manual takes time to understand.

More on this in the future. Got to go now. Thank you.

None of this needs to be touched unless you decide to OC and EPU if you'll never OC and want the PC 'ECO friendly' and low power consumption.
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March 4, 2012 5:33:57 PM

Lotus100, like you, I am first time computer builder. And it happens that I am using the same motherboard.

I totally can relate with you regarding wanting to understand this stuff before I start anything. I'm the type to obsess over every detail and reading up on everything before I do anything.

However to my dismay, manuals in general for computer parts are horrible. I mean, Corsair H-80 Water cooler's manual can't even be called a manual! The one for the chassis is confusing as well. I find myself checking youtube and forums on where to put this and that and wishing I bought myself that anti-static wristband for peace of my mind instead of touching a scissors or screwdriver every 5 seconds.

Now that I've gone thru the process of getting everything together, looking back, you're pretty much better just do it and avoid overthinking things. For the motherboard I found that chapter 2 is the most pertaining chapter for us - where this go on the mobo and so on. The rest are for overclocking and how to fiddle with BIOS like others already said.

With that said, do make sure your choice of CPU is compatible with the mobo - I was initially going to go with some other mobo but it was not LGA 1155 compatible (cpu chips apparently have different sizes called LGA). Since I could return the mobo and can't return the cpu, I got this asus one since it's LGA 1155 compatible.

Anyway since I'm a rookie, take what I said with grain of salt and good luck :) .
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March 4, 2012 10:19:38 PM

I realize that leaving the settings out of the box is easiest for getting going quickly. However, a new user like myself wants to know more about what I am buying and its capabilities. Like Unksol said: "...which you do not need to worry about unless you want to." I mean why buy something with so many unique options, if you don't want to learn, at least, the basic to intermediate stuff behind using those capabilities. That, my friend, is where I'm coming from in my questioning. Perhaps somebody else will help shed more light upon my thread questions. I sure hope so cause I enjoy knowing about these things.

With appreciation for your review of my post, cheers to you too and have a nice day.
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a c 717 V Motherboard
March 4, 2012 11:58:44 PM

Few know more, EXACTLY what is your question and what are you curious about?

For example, there are unlimited permutations on 'How to OC' the CPU alone. There are several different methods to OC the RAM, and there are several ways to reduce power consumption. This is even more compounded on the particular platform, chipset and CPU used.

There are, however, only a limited number of settings that 99.9% need to use for day-to-day normal use.

You question is like asking I am curious about everything, please explain it all to me in one or two paragraphs. Here's a small scope discussion on RAM -> http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/305395-30-memory-over...

For OC'ing start here -> http://www.clunk.org.uk/forums/overclocking/39184-p67-s...
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March 5, 2012 9:58:43 AM

To all who've entered a response: Thank you.

Please also forgive me for not selecting a best answer, since I realize the scope of my original question is quite involved and since several of you have contributed much "mental munchies" for thought.

However, I'd like to make a quick point and take a short shot at an analogy to make another point justifying my original concern: First, if you go to your computer parts dealer and make a purchase based only upon the marketing on the product box (which, if your new, you probably don't know what is going on) and you take it home to build your rig then, sooner or later, you're gonna have to read the manual. That is going to burn time off your warranty, even if it is for the minimum of 3 years. Why do you wanna do that? Don't answer, that was a retorical question just to make my point.

Second, let's think of an average new car. I don't want to mention any brand names here. But you think of any one you like. Now, it is true that you can just get in the car, turn the key, and start driving it. But, you need to aclamate yourself to its components, don't you? That was not a retorical question! I mean you've got to know how to do the basic and intermediate stuff like: check the oil, check the transmission fluid. know where certain tune up components are, understand what some of the dashboard lights are for, learn how to adjust the heat or air conditioner, know what the manufacturer recommends as the proper gas or octane to put into the car, learn when to bring the car in to change the timing belt (if it has one)--I think you get the idea.

The reason why I posed the original question of this thread, which has generated some varied and helpful responses, is pretty much for the same reason as your wanting to learn about your new car choice.

It is not only troubling to me but also some of you other posters here that the manufacturers manuals on various computer components is lacking more useful information. It's borderline not right that great manufacturing company engineers understand all the complex BIOS stuff, and they do not provide an online course to help us get our heads around the very computer electronics they've engineered for us end users. This is why I posed my original questions on the above highlighted section of this MB manual.

A special thank you to Jaquith. Your post seems to point to two links, which when I have time, I plan on reviewing.

If the moderator of this thread doesn't close out this thread then I will check back and make an update to this thread. If the thread closes then I will open another thread when it is appropriate. Again, thank you to all who've made suggestions herein. I have not gotten specific answers to my original questions, but I feel your responses have nugged my thinking towards another direction to some degree.

Good day to all of you.



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a b V Motherboard
March 5, 2012 2:34:42 PM

Lotus100 said:
Second, let's think of an average new car. I don't want to mention any brand names here. But you think of any one you like. Now, it is true that you can just get in the car, turn the key, and start driving it. But, you need to aclamate yourself to its components, don't you? That was not a retorical question! I mean you've got to know how to do the basic and intermediate stuff like: check the oil, check the transmission fluid. know where certain tune up components are, understand what some of the dashboard lights are for, learn how to adjust the heat or air conditioner, know what the manufacturer recommends as the proper gas or octane to put into the car, learn when to bring the car in to change the timing belt (if it has one)--I think you get the idea.


Lets use your analogy... I would say that the OS "front end" is the equivilent of your "check oil, check transmission fluid.... dashboard lights are for" etc... and the MOBO BIOs is more like the electronic fuel management system. Its there... it can be tweaked if needed... but most users are not expected to have to worry about it. Thats why the BIOS is pretty much "under the hood" of the PC.

Just another perspective... ;) 
Cheers




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March 5, 2012 10:28:32 PM

Yoji, yes, I can see your point. And thank you for your continued interest in this thread. However, the BIOS is still there as you put it "under the hood" and I don't want to find myself in a situation where I do not know how to make minor adjustments.

In my opinion, if the computer engineers put it there then they should also be responsible for having their manual explain how those items work, what are acceptable settings, how those settings effect other settings, etc. When they just give the brief description of the setting itself without an appropriate explanation of how to use it properly when necessary, that is not helpful to any of us.

I don't think any user wants to risk causing damage to their rigs.

I believe your reference to "OS" means Operating System. And "yes" I can expect that the OS will alert me to any problems with the MB. However, my OS may be Windows 7 for the build I plan on putting together. I will be expecting it to do its job and inform me of any problems with my MB (if any). But it is not going to tell me , for example, to set my BIOS to use the AHCI mode when using a SATA hardware device. I learn that only by understanding what's in the BIOS. Furthermore, it is not going to tell me where to put a graphics card defined as a PCIEX16. Nor is it going to tell me how to get the PCIEX16 card to work in X4 mode. The only way I can learn about this is to understand what is in the BIOS.

Even if I have the ability to tell the system to run in the default fail safe mode or the optimum mode then I still have to understand the BIOS.

That's why I posted the several questions I did on Chapter 3 of this MB manual.

Again, it is my opinion, that more guidance and clarification is necessary and must be the responsibility of the manufacturer. You said in an earlier post that manufacturers take all kinds of users in mind beginners to advanced. It is for this reason they need to elaborate more upon their powerful products. Not everyone is an computer electronics engineer! And, I'll safely assume, that most all people who want to build a computer have an interest in learning how to work things safely and properly. For example, look at the onboard booting and reseting switches the manf. put on the MB. They put it their because they know some of their users (advanced) will find those switches helpful.

Cheers ;) 

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a b V Motherboard
March 6, 2012 8:23:27 AM

I think your argument here is confused and inconsistent.

You say you appreciate the concept that stuff can be "under the hood".... but then go on to suggest that you NEED to know every single nuance of the BIOS operation. You go on to infer that if you dont... "I don't think any user wants to risk causing damage to their rigs"... thats just emotive and unhelpful.

You seem to have failed to pick out the point in my analogy about the electronic fuel injection... I guess you are happy that you dont know about that in your car?... but you are still able to use your car perfectly effectively... you should perhaps liken most aspects of the BIOS to that.

Your behaviour is almost "OCD" like!!! ;) ... you risk "paralysis by analysis"... let it go and... do it!!

OFC...if you are just interested.. thats fine... dig away at the layers of detail to your hearts content, but dont dress it up as "I need to know this or I will break my MOBO".

Anyway - we probably coming at this from different angles. I said all I plan to on this.. dont think I can add more.

Cheers






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March 6, 2012 10:26:16 AM

yoji said:

You seem to have failed to pick out the point in my analogy about the electronic fuel injection... I guess you are happy that you dont know about that in your car?... but you are still able to use your car perfectly effectively... you should perhaps liken most aspects of the BIOS to that.


yoji, I do have an understanding of electronic fuel injection. Oh, I may not be an ASAE qualified car mechanic, but I do understand the system. I also get what you are saying in your own analogy.

yoji said:

Your behaviour is almost "OCD" like!!! ;) ... you risk "paralysis by analysis"... let it go and... do it!!


yoji, you are right to warn of the pitfall of "paralysis by analysis". I am aware of this flaw in ones thinking. I am also not planning on digging so deep as to halt all of my own progress on my new project to build a computer system. It is apparent to me, by other comments and yours my friend, that building a computer system is much easier than one may think at first. I know this. My angle on this matter really focuses on becoming more familiar with what I am buying and with the intention of utilizing the system properly and getting the most out of my MB system. Surely you can understand that!

One more thing: I'm not trying to become a fully qualified electronic computer engineer. I just want to be s informed about things on my MB as is reasonably possible. I empasize "reasonably possible."

People who understand proper overclocking techniques had to start somewhere. Well, I guess I'm at the intersection of "Somewhere" and "Wanting-to-Learn-Some-More" about all this stuff. :lol:  You've got to admit it is rather a complex subject matter. Because of that I will lighten up on this line of questioning.

yoji said:

OFC...if you are just interested.. thats fine... dig away at the layers of detail to your hearts content, but dont dress it up as "I need to know this or I will break my MOBO".


yoji, I never meant to imply that "I need to know this or I will break my MOBO". No, not at all, but here's what I meant to say: I just don't want to find myself in a difficult situation with my computer system, if I do something wrong. Setting things up improperly, by way of not really understanding what you are doing in the BIOS or on your MB itself, can indeed lead one into "troubled waters". And I say idiomatically!

yoji said:

Anyway - we probably coming at this from different angles. I said all I plan to on this.. dont think I can add more.


And I thank you for your contribution on this thread. Perhaps this post will help you to understand better where my questions were coming from. It is just a need to understand more of what I can reasonably expect to have access to.

Hey, yoji, please enjoy a soft drink of your choice on me. Good day to you.
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March 10, 2012 12:57:14 AM

Best answer selected by Lotus100.
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a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 329 V Motherboard
March 10, 2012 1:10:47 AM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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