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I 2600k Video Editing build

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March 28, 2011 4:51:55 PM

This is my first-ever build, I will use it primarily for video editing with premiere and after effects, also photo editing with photoshop.
I have researched a fair amount so the main questions I have are regarding RAM and the GPU.

Is the gtx570 enough for my needs? Overkill? Pricey?

How is this RAM?


CPU: Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I72600K
Item #: N82E16819115070

CASE: COOLER MASTER Gladiator 600 RC-600-KKN1-GP Black SECC Body ; Mesh Front bezel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Item #: N82E16811119206

MOBO: ASUS P8P67 PRO MOTHERBOARD - ASP8P67P -On backorder, anyone have any idea where I can find one in stock, or when they're expected to be widely available again?

RAM: 16GB, 2X CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMZ8GX3M2A1600C9
Item #: N82E16820233144


Boot Drive: Crucial RealSSD C300 CTFDDAC128MAG-1G1 2.5" 128GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)
Item #: N82E16820148348


GPU: ASUS ENGTX570/2DI/1280MD5 GeForce GTX 570 (Fermi) 1280MB 320-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
Item #: N82E16814121412


Main Storage drive: 2-Western Digital Caviar Black WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
Item #: N82E16822136533

-Arranged in RAID 0, with another WD 2TB green drive for backup


PSU: CORSAIR CMPSU-850TX 850W ATX12V 2.2 / EPS12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC Power Supply
Item #: N82E16817139009


Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit 1-Pack for System Builders - OEM


Optical drive: LG Black 10X Blu-ray Burner - Bulk SATA WH10LS30 LightScribe Support - OEM
Item #: N82E16827136181


Monitor: ASUS VE276Q Black 27" Full HD HDMI Widescreen LCD Monitor w/Display Port & Speakers
Item #: N82E16824236091

Thanks to any and all who help me with this build!
March 29, 2011 2:22:00 AM

That's a great build.

You could get away with ASUS P8P67, since you won't need 2 cards for video editing as they are not recognized in Premiere.

You could also just grab a 470 and save some money:
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

They will perform about the same, obv the 570 is better, but the 470 is still beastly.

For your case, why don't you go with the CM 690 II Advanced?
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It's a much better case.

Also, are you getting an Air Cooler?
March 29, 2011 2:39:01 AM

kg2010 said:
That's a great build.

You could get away with ASUS P8P67, since you won't need 2 cards for video editing as they are not recognized in Premiere.

You could also just grab a 470 and save some money:
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

They will perform about the same, obv the 570 is better, but the 470 is still beastly.

For your case, why don't you go with the CM 690 II Advanced?
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It's a much better case.

Also, are you getting an Air Cooler?



I based these choices on recommendations from a friend, so I'm not as well-informed as I ought to be...so forgive my ignorance here:

-Is the dual card option the biggest advantage of the P8P67 Pro?

-Is it any risk whatsoever to pair different brands of mobo and graphics card? The advice I got was to stick with Asus on both, which is why I was looking at the GTX 570, the Asus GTX470 is either out of stock or outrageously priced everywhere I've found. If I can mix and match safely, would that Gigabyte card be the best for the price?

I do like the CM 690 II advanced, maybe I will go with that case...unless anyone else has a better idea?
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March 29, 2011 3:02:27 AM
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IMO, yes, that's the only benefit of going with the P8P67 PRO, and in your case, it wouldn't really be relevant for a video editing build that won't utilize SLI.

Whoever told you about risks in pairing different brands is horribly misinformed. Such issues do not exist.

IMO, go with the 470, it's a great card for the price, and it's pretty beastly. The 570's have weak VRM's, and there are too many that have died when overclocked, plus in your case, it won't really make a difference.

Another case you could look at is:
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

The CM 690 II has awesome air flow, it's a nice looking case, and a great price.

I recommend you get an air cooler so you can overclock that 2600k to at least 4.5.

Something like the A70 is $27.99 after $20 rebate:
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1683...

OH, and your hard drives, you could go with these instead, they are AWESOME drives in RAID0:
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1682...

This is a great build you put together. Congrats.
March 29, 2011 3:08:08 AM

Avoid Raid 0 if you plan on storing data that have value to you...RAID 0 can be unstable. Switch to RAID 1 (if you think you need RAID) or 1+0.
March 29, 2011 3:12:21 AM

Best answer selected by jmaus13.
March 29, 2011 3:15:13 AM

selas said:
Avoid Raid 0 if you plan on storing data that have value to you...RAID 0 can be unstable. Switch to RAID 1 (if you think you need RAID) or 1+0.


I'm not 100% sure about the need for RAID, I understand that the advantage of RAID 0 is speed...but will that make enough difference in editing video and photos to justify the risk (and extra cost for a dedicated backup drive)?
March 29, 2011 3:19:07 AM

jmaus13 said:
I'm not 100% sure about the need for RAID, I understand that the advantage of RAID 0 is speed...but will that make enough difference in editing video and photos to justify the risk (and extra cost for a dedicated backup drive)?


Personally, I would keep them separate.

Use 1 drive for your scratch disk. Use another for your renders, and use the 2TB for your backup / data.

Use the SSD strictly as your boot / apps drive.
March 29, 2011 3:26:02 AM

Again, please forgive my ignorance:

So the speed gained with RAID wouldn't be worth the risk? When you say one disk for renders, do you mean as a scratch disk for video previews?

What's the advantage of having a separate disk for that?
March 29, 2011 3:35:22 AM

Another question:

I see the GTX 560 Ti is comparable in price to the 470, which would be better for editing video?
March 29, 2011 3:42:53 AM

The scratch disk is where all your main data you're working on goes.

The renders are the video previews. When they are on some separate disks, your work flow will be faster.

Also, the 470 is better than the 560, I won't go into all the technical details, which you may not understand. ;)  Just trust me on that one.

But if you want technicalities, let me know. :) 
March 29, 2011 3:56:24 AM

kg2010 said:
The scratch disk is where all your main data you're working on goes.

The renders are the video previews. When they are on some separate disks, your work flow will be faster.

Also, the 470 is better than the 560, I don't go into all the technical details, which you may not understand. ;)  Just trust me on that one.

But if you want technicalities, let me know. :) 



Got it. So it sounds like using the 2 disks separately will be faster than if they were combined in RAID?

And I appreciate your patience, the tech details wouldn't be entirely lost on me, but I will definitely take your word for it. 470 it is.

Thanks a million!
March 29, 2011 4:10:31 AM

Ok cool, well here's some info...

1. 470 has 448 CUDA cores vs 384 with the 560.

2. "For GF104, NVIDIA removed FP64 from only 2 of the 3 blocks of CUDA cores. As a result 1 block of 16 CUDA cores is FP64 capable, while the other 2 are not. This gives NVIDIA the advantage of being able to employ smaller CUDA cores for 32 of the 48 CUDA cores in each SM while not removing FP64 entirely. Because only 1 block of CUDA cores has FP64 capabilities and in turn executes FP64 instructions at 1/4 FP32 performance (handicapped from a native 1/2), GF104 will not be a FP64 monster."

In other words double precision performance took a rather severe hit with gf104, in comparison to gf100. Nvidia also switched to a superscalar execution process with gf104, which is a method of extracting instruction level parallelism (ILP) from a thread, as opposed to thread level parallelism (TLP) implemented in gf100. Again, this tends to benefit gaming efficiency/performance more so then compute performance. You can read more about these architectural tweaks in the linked article below:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/3809/nvidias-geforce-gtx-...

The same applies to the 560.
!