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Anonymous
a b C Monitor
February 14, 2005 7:16:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm not too critical about color but I'd like my prints to be close to what
the monitor displays. The problem is, only one of my three printers is out
of whack so I suspect monitor calibration is not going to help.

Using a Dell laptop the colors and brightness on my screen are very close
to what my Canon i850 prints (source file is JPEG large from a Canon 1D). I
tried on my wife's Canon i450 and the same thing - a very close match with
my monitor.

But when I send the same file to my brand new Epson 2200, the print is much,
much darker.

Just for tests, I took the same file and boosted the "Brightness" control in
Photoshop CS by a value of 25 and then the Epson was somewhat closer, in
brightness but not color, to what I see on the screen and what the Canon
prints.

So is monitor calibration really going to help? I think instead I need some
sort of curve for my printer, while my monitor is fine. If I did calibrate
the monitor to match the Epson printer, my screen would probably be so dark
it would be hard to see the menus.

Here is my workflow:

For 13x19 print on Epson Professional Media Premium Glossy Photo Paper,
resized image by cropping to 11x17.

From Photoshop CS , boost Brightness by value of 25.

Choose Print with Preview. Click on Page Setup.

Click on Printer and choose Epson 2200 and click OK

Set paper size to Super B (13x19 in), choose Orientation landscape and click
OK.

I set width to 17. inches

Choose Color management: Document sRGB

Print space: Profiles: RGB IEC61966-2.1, Intent: Relative Colormetric

Check box for Use Black Point Compensation

Click Print button

Verify again printer is correct

Color management choose ICM

ICC profile choose 'Applied by printer software', Epson Standard,
Perceptual, SP2200 Premium Glossy_PK

Uncheck Fast printing and edge smoothing

Paper and quality options: Sheet, Premium Glossy Photo Paper, SuperPhoto -
2880dpi, Super B, Landscape, print preview.

On Page Layout tab choose Centered

Click OK to begin printing.

More about : monitor calibration

February 14, 2005 7:17:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dave R knows who wrote:
> I'm not too critical about color but I'd like my prints to be close to what
> the monitor displays. The problem is, only one of my three printers is out
> of whack so I suspect monitor calibration is not going to help.
<snip>
I don't think you need to calibrate the monitor more. You have to set up each printer to match the monitor. The procedure
depends on the image editing software you are printing from. For example, here is a method for Paint Shop Pro:
http://www.campratty.com/1faq/faqpages/b9a.html.
February 15, 2005 3:22:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi there.

You are correct it is not your Monitor Profile, that is causing the problem,

It is because you are converting twice, once in PS and again in the Printer.
You also seem to be using the wrong profile.

From what I can gather, most people do the following.

In Print with Preview

Source Space - should be Document, and the profile showing should be the
one PS is using as its Work Space, sRGB or Adobe RGB.

Print Space - should be the Epson Printer Profile, specific to the paper you
are about to print on. ( 2200 Premium Glossy)

Intent - Relative Colourimetric or Perceptual according to taste.

Use Black Point.

In the Printer Driver Dialogue.

Set Colour Ink, Orientation as usual.

In Media drop down list - choose the paper you are about to use.

Go to Custom then Advanced and choose "No Colour Management".

Uncheck High Speed, Smooth edges, Finest Detail, etc and select 2880Dpi.

Then click Print.

PS will now do the conversion from its Working Space (sRGB) to the Printer's
Profile, and send that Data to the printer, which will print what PS has
sent without making any colour conversions. This should give as accurate a
Print as is possible.

OR - There is a different way.

In PS Select Document in Working Space as before, but in Print Space select
Colour Management by Printer.

In the Printer dialogue you will then be able to choose any of the Fancy
options, but "Automatic" will probably give you a very reasonable result.

Whatever you do, do not combine both of these ways, because then PS will do
the conversion and when the Printer gets the Data it will apply another
similar set of conversions to that info, and you will get wrong colours.

ICM is Windows version of Colour Management, and you do not need another set
of conversions being applied.

Hope this helps, but CM is a difficult subject, and the obvious choices are
often not the correct ones.

Roy G



"Dave R knows who" <kilbyfan@spamnotAOL.com> wrote in message
news:%94Qd.6742$m31.82229@typhoon.sonic.net...
> I'm not too critical about color but I'd like my prints to be close to
> what the monitor displays. The problem is, only one of my three printers
> is out of whack so I suspect monitor calibration is not going to help.
>
> Using a Dell laptop the colors and brightness on my screen are very close
> to what my Canon i850 prints (source file is JPEG large from a Canon 1D).
> I tried on my wife's Canon i450 and the same thing - a very close match
> with my monitor.
>
> But when I send the same file to my brand new Epson 2200, the print is
> much, much darker.
>
> Just for tests, I took the same file and boosted the "Brightness" control
> in Photoshop CS by a value of 25 and then the Epson was somewhat closer,
> in brightness but not color, to what I see on the screen and what the
> Canon prints.
>
> So is monitor calibration really going to help? I think instead I need
> some sort of curve for my printer, while my monitor is fine. If I did
> calibrate the monitor to match the Epson printer, my screen would probably
> be so dark it would be hard to see the menus.
>
> Here is my workflow:
>
> For 13x19 print on Epson Professional Media Premium Glossy Photo Paper,
> resized image by cropping to 11x17.
>
> From Photoshop CS , boost Brightness by value of 25.
>
> Choose Print with Preview. Click on Page Setup.
>
> Click on Printer and choose Epson 2200 and click OK
>
> Set paper size to Super B (13x19 in), choose Orientation landscape and
> click OK.
>
> I set width to 17. inches
>
> Choose Color management: Document sRGB
>
> Print space: Profiles: RGB IEC61966-2.1, Intent: Relative Colormetric
>
> Check box for Use Black Point Compensation
>
> Click Print button
>
> Verify again printer is correct
>
> Color management choose ICM
>
> ICC profile choose 'Applied by printer software', Epson Standard,
> Perceptual, SP2200 Premium Glossy_PK
>
> Uncheck Fast printing and edge smoothing
>
> Paper and quality options: Sheet, Premium Glossy Photo Paper, SuperPhoto -
> 2880dpi, Super B, Landscape, print preview.
>
> On Page Layout tab choose Centered
>
> Click OK to begin printing.
>
>
>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
February 15, 2005 8:04:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Awesome, just awesome. I've got great prints now!


"Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
news:ahbQd.800$_Z.137@newsfe5-gui.ntli.net...
> Hi there.
>
> You are correct it is not your Monitor Profile, that is causing the
> problem,
>
> It is because you are converting twice, once in PS and again in the
> Printer. You also seem to be using the wrong profile.
>
> From what I can gather, most people do the following.
>
> In Print with Preview
>
> Source Space - should be Document, and the profile showing should be the
> one PS is using as its Work Space, sRGB or Adobe RGB.
>
> Print Space - should be the Epson Printer Profile, specific to the paper
> you are about to print on. ( 2200 Premium Glossy)
>
> Intent - Relative Colourimetric or Perceptual according to taste.
>
> Use Black Point.
>
> In the Printer Driver Dialogue.
>
> Set Colour Ink, Orientation as usual.
>
> In Media drop down list - choose the paper you are about to use.
>
> Go to Custom then Advanced and choose "No Colour Management".
>
> Uncheck High Speed, Smooth edges, Finest Detail, etc and select 2880Dpi.
>
> Then click Print.
>
> PS will now do the conversion from its Working Space (sRGB) to the
> Printer's Profile, and send that Data to the printer, which will print
> what PS has sent without making any colour conversions. This should give
> as accurate a Print as is possible.
>
> OR - There is a different way.
>
> In PS Select Document in Working Space as before, but in Print Space
> select Colour Management by Printer.
>
> In the Printer dialogue you will then be able to choose any of the Fancy
> options, but "Automatic" will probably give you a very reasonable result.
>
> Whatever you do, do not combine both of these ways, because then PS will
> do the conversion and when the Printer gets the Data it will apply another
> similar set of conversions to that info, and you will get wrong colours.
>
> ICM is Windows version of Colour Management, and you do not need another
> set of conversions being applied.
>
> Hope this helps, but CM is a difficult subject, and the obvious choices
> are often not the correct ones.
>
> Roy G
>
>
>
> "Dave R knows who" <kilbyfan@spamnotAOL.com> wrote in message
> news:%94Qd.6742$m31.82229@typhoon.sonic.net...
>> I'm not too critical about color but I'd like my prints to be close to
>> what the monitor displays. The problem is, only one of my three printers
>> is out of whack so I suspect monitor calibration is not going to help.
>>
>> Using a Dell laptop the colors and brightness on my screen are very
>> close to what my Canon i850 prints (source file is JPEG large from a
>> Canon 1D). I tried on my wife's Canon i450 and the same thing - a very
>> close match with my monitor.
>>
>> But when I send the same file to my brand new Epson 2200, the print is
>> much, much darker.
>>
>> Just for tests, I took the same file and boosted the "Brightness" control
>> in Photoshop CS by a value of 25 and then the Epson was somewhat closer,
>> in brightness but not color, to what I see on the screen and what the
>> Canon prints.
>>
>> So is monitor calibration really going to help? I think instead I need
>> some sort of curve for my printer, while my monitor is fine. If I did
>> calibrate the monitor to match the Epson printer, my screen would
>> probably be so dark it would be hard to see the menus.
>>
>> Here is my workflow:
>>
>> For 13x19 print on Epson Professional Media Premium Glossy Photo Paper,
>> resized image by cropping to 11x17.
>>
>> From Photoshop CS , boost Brightness by value of 25.
>>
>> Choose Print with Preview. Click on Page Setup.
>>
>> Click on Printer and choose Epson 2200 and click OK
>>
>> Set paper size to Super B (13x19 in), choose Orientation landscape and
>> click OK.
>>
>> I set width to 17. inches
>>
>> Choose Color management: Document sRGB
>>
>> Print space: Profiles: RGB IEC61966-2.1, Intent: Relative Colormetric
>>
>> Check box for Use Black Point Compensation
>>
>> Click Print button
>>
>> Verify again printer is correct
>>
>> Color management choose ICM
>>
>> ICC profile choose 'Applied by printer software', Epson Standard,
>> Perceptual, SP2200 Premium Glossy_PK
>>
>> Uncheck Fast printing and edge smoothing
>>
>> Paper and quality options: Sheet, Premium Glossy Photo Paper,
>> SuperPhoto - 2880dpi, Super B, Landscape, print preview.
>>
>> On Page Layout tab choose Centered
>>
>> Click OK to begin printing.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
February 15, 2005 8:05:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

THANK YOU!
February 15, 2005 5:25:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Good. Glad I could help.

Have you tried making these prints at 1440? That is what I use most of the
time, it does speed up the process and saves on Ink. Some people I know,
never use any more than 720 for big Prints. I should add that I don't have a
2200, only a 1290, but they are both very good printers, and the CM
principles are the same for all Printers.

Perhaps you should now take a look at your workflow for your other Printers,
you may have been applying similar errors, but might just have been lucky
enough to have them cancel one another out.

Roy G


"Dave R knows who" <kilbyfan@spamnotAOL.com> wrote in message
news:eqfQd.6881$m31.85937@typhoon.sonic.net...
> THANK YOU!
>
February 15, 2005 9:13:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dave R knows who wrote:

> I'm not too critical about color but I'd like my prints to be close to what
> the monitor displays. The problem is, only one of my three printers is out
> of whack so I suspect monitor calibration is not going to help.
>
> Using a Dell laptop the colors and brightness on my screen are very close
> to what my Canon i850 prints (source file is JPEG large from a Canon 1D). I
> tried on my wife's Canon i450 and the same thing - a very close match with
> my monitor.
>
> But when I send the same file to my brand new Epson 2200, the print is much,
> much darker.
>
> Just for tests, I took the same file and boosted the "Brightness" control in
> Photoshop CS by a value of 25 and then the Epson was somewhat closer, in
> brightness but not color, to what I see on the screen and what the Canon
> prints.
>
> So is monitor calibration really going to help? I think instead I need some
> sort of curve for my printer, while my monitor is fine. If I did calibrate
> the monitor to match the Epson printer, my screen would probably be so dark
> it would be hard to see the menus.

Doesn't sound like a monitor calibration issue, there are some more
settings in the epson driver.

Here's a couple great pages:
http://www.computer-darkroom.com/ps8-colour/ps8_1.htm
http://www.computer-darkroom.com/ps7_print/ps7_print_ma...

In particular, that second one shows exactly how to configure an epson
printer.


>
> Here is my workflow:
>
> For 13x19 print on Epson Professional Media Premium Glossy Photo Paper,
> resized image by cropping to 11x17.
>
> From Photoshop CS , boost Brightness by value of 25.
>
> Choose Print with Preview. Click on Page Setup.
>
> Click on Printer and choose Epson 2200 and click OK
>
> Set paper size to Super B (13x19 in), choose Orientation landscape and click
> OK.
>
> I set width to 17. inches
>
> Choose Color management: Document sRGB
>
> Print space: Profiles: RGB IEC61966-2.1, Intent: Relative Colormetric


Should be sRGB rather than the IEC thing?


>
> Check box for Use Black Point Compensation
>
> Click Print button
>
> Verify again printer is correct
>
> Color management choose ICM
>
> ICC profile choose 'Applied by printer software', Epson Standard,
> Perceptual, SP2200 Premium Glossy_PK

Sounds like you got the correct Epson profile but maybe need to download
a closer match? I'm not seeing these options where you say but in the
print-with-preview (show more options checked):

Source: sRGB

Print Space: Epson [your model] premium glossy

What I do see from the print button > properties > advanced... is the
Color Controls versus No Color Adjustment and supposedly if I have set
up my printer profile I shouldn't need color controls but when I choose
that option, it's too dark as yours is so I've gone back to Color
Controls. Perhaps the Gamma 1.8 is not correct because the monitor
should be set to 2.2, hmm but that is only available using Color
Controls which looks pretty close anyways.

After running a print with that setting, I'm pretty happy with this
setup, it has more saturation (closer to the monitor) and is about the
right darkness. Now I'm just about out of yellow & cyan ink after all
these tests though <grin>.

>
> Uncheck Fast printing and edge smoothing
>
> Paper and quality options: Sheet, Premium Glossy Photo Paper, SuperPhoto -
> 2880dpi, Super B, Landscape, print preview.


Yeah I had no idea there was the option to print slower (better
presumably) & at twice the dpi hidden in the custom advanced button!
I've just got a cheap little C80 & hadn't bothered finding these
settings till today or color management on the printer end. It wasn't
too bad to figure out though & things look much better.

>
> On Page Layout tab choose Centered
>
> Click OK to begin printing.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
February 16, 2005 2:27:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
news:sDnQd.250$dv2.244@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
> Good. Glad I could help.
>
> Have you tried making these prints at 1440? That is what I use most of
> the time, it does speed up the process and saves on Ink. Some people I
> know, never use any more than 720 for big Prints. I should add that I
> don't have a 2200, only a 1290, but they are both very good printers, and
> the CM principles are the same for all Printers.
>
> Perhaps you should now take a look at your workflow for your other
> Printers, you may have been applying similar errors, but might just have
> been lucky enough to have them cancel one another out.
>
> Roy G
>

I did try the 1440 previously with good results (doing the old dumb workflow
with +25 on the brightness), but last night I needed them to be 'the best
they could be' for a sale so I stuck with 2880. Shipping the prints today.
If you got a paypal address I'll send you $5 for your help! :) 
February 16, 2005 3:38:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks Dave, but a few helpful words does not cost anything.

We Photographers are usually quite generous, often too generous, with our
advice on "How to do it Better"

One of our local Pubs has an engraved mirror behind the bar. It says " A
Good Pint - Good Food - and a few Kind Words". A visitor to the area went
in, ordered a Pint and a Meat Pie. He started on his Pint and remarked to
the Barmaid - "I've got the Pint and the Food, all I need is the Kind Words"
Her reply was "Dinnae eat the Pie"

You might be able to help me out some time.

Roy G.


"Dave R knows who" <kilbyfan@spamnotAOL.com> wrote in message
news:o zvQd.6974$m31.87305@typhoon.sonic.net...
>
> "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:sDnQd.250$dv2.244@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
>> Good. Glad I could help.
>>
>> Have you tried making these prints at 1440? That is what I use most of
>> the time, it does speed up the process and saves on Ink. Some people I
>> know, never use any more than 720 for big Prints. I should add that I
>> don't have a 2200, only a 1290, but they are both very good printers, and
>> the CM principles are the same for all Printers.
>>
>> Perhaps you should now take a look at your workflow for your other
>> Printers, you may have been applying similar errors, but might just have
>> been lucky enough to have them cancel one another out.
>>
>> Roy G
>>
>
> I did try the 1440 previously with good results (doing the old dumb
> workflow with +25 on the brightness), but last night I needed them to be
> 'the best they could be' for a sale so I stuck with 2880. Shipping the
> prints today. If you got a paypal address I'll send you $5 for your help!
> :) 
>
February 16, 2005 11:42:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Roy wrote:

> Hi there.
>
> You are correct it is not your Monitor Profile, that is causing the problem,
>
> It is because you are converting twice, once in PS and again in the Printer.
> You also seem to be using the wrong profile.
>
> From what I can gather, most people do the following.
>
> In Print with Preview
>
> Source Space - should be Document, and the profile showing should be the
> one PS is using as its Work Space, sRGB or Adobe RGB.
>
> Print Space - should be the Epson Printer Profile, specific to the paper you
> are about to print on. ( 2200 Premium Glossy)


Maybe this is my problem, I only have one option for the cheapo Epson
C80 that does not specify paper. I don't see anything at the epson site
for download. Hmm, I guess the driver is newer so I'm trying that.


>
> Intent - Relative Colourimetric or Perceptual according to taste.
>
> Use Black Point.
>
> In the Printer Driver Dialogue.
>
> Set Colour Ink, Orientation as usual.
>
> In Media drop down list - choose the paper you are about to use.
>
> Go to Custom then Advanced and choose "No Colour Management".


I think this is the setting that gives me too dark of a print. Before
any fiddling it was about the right darkness but not saturated enough.


>
> Uncheck High Speed, Smooth edges, Finest Detail, etc and select 2880Dpi.
>
> Then click Print.
>
> PS will now do the conversion from its Working Space (sRGB) to the Printer's
> Profile, and send that Data to the printer, which will print what PS has
> sent without making any colour conversions. This should give as accurate a
> Print as is possible.
>
> OR - There is a different way.
>
> In PS Select Document in Working Space as before, but in Print Space select
> Colour Management by Printer.
>
> In the Printer dialogue you will then be able to choose any of the Fancy
> options, but "Automatic" will probably give you a very reasonable result.
>
> Whatever you do, do not combine both of these ways, because then PS will do
> the conversion and when the Printer gets the Data it will apply another
> similar set of conversions to that info, and you will get wrong colours.


Maybe for this simple of a printer I just need to do the auto method.


>
> ICM is Windows version of Colour Management, and you do not need another set
> of conversions being applied.
>
> Hope this helps, but CM is a difficult subject, and the obvious choices are
> often not the correct ones.
>
> Roy G
February 16, 2005 2:20:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bah! I give up. I did find this page that suggests the photoenhance
setting and it looks probably the best though a bit light:
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/printers/epso...

I understand what you mean about not running the color processing twice
but that setting probably looked a little better though just with this
one picture I've been testing, it's likely that would mess up colors on
other pictures. Now that I think of it, the Luminous Landscape settings
say to use the printer profile plus photoenhance so maybe that's not
necessarily the worst thing. He also agrees 2880dpi provides miniscule
improvement. Using the printer profile and no color correction looked
way too light and undersaturated, similar to the default settings.

Anyways it's been educational but I think I'm going to wait till I get a
better printer before spending much more time on this.

Thanks for your tips.



paul wrote:
> Roy wrote:
>
>> Hi there.
>>
>> You are correct it is not your Monitor Profile, that is causing the
>> problem,
>>
>> It is because you are converting twice, once in PS and again in the
>> Printer. You also seem to be using the wrong profile.
>>
>> From what I can gather, most people do the following.
>>
>> In Print with Preview
>>
>> Source Space - should be Document, and the profile showing should be
>> the one PS is using as its Work Space, sRGB or Adobe RGB.
>>
>> Print Space - should be the Epson Printer Profile, specific to the
>> paper you are about to print on. ( 2200 Premium Glossy)
>
>
>
> Maybe this is my problem, I only have one option for the cheapo Epson
> C80 that does not specify paper. I don't see anything at the epson site
> for download. Hmm, I guess the driver is newer so I'm trying that.
>
>
>>
>> Intent - Relative Colourimetric or Perceptual according to taste.
>>
>> Use Black Point.
>>
>> In the Printer Driver Dialogue.
>>
>> Set Colour Ink, Orientation as usual.
>>
>> In Media drop down list - choose the paper you are about to use.
>>
>> Go to Custom then Advanced and choose "No Colour Management".
>
>
>
> I think this is the setting that gives me too dark of a print. Before
> any fiddling it was about the right darkness but not saturated enough.
>
>
>>
>> Uncheck High Speed, Smooth edges, Finest Detail, etc and select 2880Dpi.
>>
>> Then click Print.
>>
>> PS will now do the conversion from its Working Space (sRGB) to the
>> Printer's Profile, and send that Data to the printer, which will print
>> what PS has sent without making any colour conversions. This should
>> give as accurate a Print as is possible.
>>
>> OR - There is a different way.
>>
>> In PS Select Document in Working Space as before, but in Print Space
>> select Colour Management by Printer.
>>
>> In the Printer dialogue you will then be able to choose any of the
>> Fancy options, but "Automatic" will probably give you a very
>> reasonable result.
>>
>> Whatever you do, do not combine both of these ways, because then PS
>> will do the conversion and when the Printer gets the Data it will
>> apply another similar set of conversions to that info, and you will
>> get wrong colours.
>
>
>
> Maybe for this simple of a printer I just need to do the auto method.
>
>
>>
>> ICM is Windows version of Colour Management, and you do not need
>> another set of conversions being applied.
>>
>> Hope this helps, but CM is a difficult subject, and the obvious
>> choices are often not the correct ones.
>>
>> Roy G
February 16, 2005 6:10:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi Paul.

My first reply to Dave gave the Workflow most people use, and he seems to
agree with me that it does work. I can make good quality prints first time,
and only ever need to reprint to correct faults (very rarely colour balance)
I did not notice while I was editing.

It is VERY IMPORTANT to select No Colour Management in the Epson Advanced
Print Dialogue, otherwise the conversions will happen twice. (Once in PS and
again in the Printer)

The second option shown stops PS making the conversions, and allows the
Printer to do them, so you can then Play with the fancy settings.

It is also advisable to setup Proof in PS > View > Proof Set Up to the
Printer/Paper Profile, so that you will be able to get an impression of how
the Picture will look after it has been printed. Only do the setting up when
no Image is open in PS.

For Print work, it is advisable to select Adobe RGB as the Work Space for
Photoshop, (see PS > Edit > Colour Settings), as Adobe RGB has a Gamut more
suited to Inkjets. The colour in sRGB is a bit more restricted, and is
really only suited for Electronic Display. Some people nowadays are using
Pro-Photo RGB because it has an ever wider Gamut, and suits the newer Ink
sets available, (Epson Ultra Chrome, etc).

The pages you supplied on Ian Lyons Site are very good for learning about
Colour Management, and I do advise using them, but they are very detailed,
and it is a bit difficult to extract a simple workflow.

Give my workflow a try, and see what you think.

Roy G


"paul" <paul@not.net> wrote in message
news:AISdnZGxbvWuMY_fRVn-vw@speakeasy.net...
> Dave R knows who wrote:
>
>> I'm not too critical about color but I'd like my prints to be close to
>> what the monitor displays. The problem is, only one of my three printers
>> is out of whack so I suspect monitor calibration is not going to help.
>> --------- snip----------
> settings in the epson driver.
>
> Here's a couple great pages:
> http://www.computer-darkroom.com/ps8-colour/ps8_1.htm
> http://www.computer-darkroom.com/ps7_print/ps7_print_ma...
>
> In particular, that second one shows exactly how to configure an epson
> printer.
>
>
>>
>> Here is my workflow:
>>
>> For 13x19 print on Epson Professional Media Premium Glossy Photo Paper,
>> resized image by cropping to 11x17.
>> -----------------snip----------------------
>>
>> Print space: Profiles: RGB IEC61966-2.1, Intent: Relative Colormetric
>
>
> Should be sRGB rather than the IEC thing?
>
>
>>
>> Check box for Use Black Point Compensation
>>
>> -----------------snip-----------------------
>> ICC profile choose 'Applied by printer software', Epson Standard,
>> Perceptual, SP2200 Premium Glossy_PK
>
> Sounds like you got the correct Epson profile but maybe need to download a
> closer match? I'm not seeing these options where you say but in the
> print-with-preview (show more options checked):
>
> Source: sRGB
>
> Print Space: Epson [your model] premium glossy
>
> What I do see from the print button > properties > advanced... is the
> Color Controls versus No Color Adjustment and supposedly if I have set up
> my printer profile I shouldn't need color controls but when I choose that
> option, it's too dark as yours is so I've gone back to Color Controls.
> Perhaps the Gamma 1.8 is not correct because the monitor should be set to
> 2.2, hmm but that is only available using Color Controls which looks
> pretty close anyways.
>
> After running a print with that setting, I'm pretty happy with this setup,
> it has more saturation (closer to the monitor) and is about the right
> darkness. Now I'm just about out of yellow & cyan ink after all these
> tests though <grin>.
>
>>
>> Uncheck Fast printing and edge smoothing
>>
>> Paper and quality options: Sheet, Premium Glossy Photo Paper,
>> SuperPhoto - 2880dpi, Super B, Landscape, print preview.
>
>
> Yeah I had no idea there was the option to print slower (better
> presumably) & at twice the dpi hidden in the custom advanced button! I've
> just got a cheap little C80 & hadn't bothered finding these settings till
> today or color management on the printer end. It wasn't too bad to figure
> out though & things look much better.
>
>>
>> On Page Layout tab choose Centered
>>
>> Click OK to begin printing.
>
February 16, 2005 6:10:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Roy wrote:

> Hi Paul.
>
> My first reply to Dave gave the Workflow most people use, and he seems to
> agree with me that it does work. I can make good quality prints first time,

Heh, I'm guilty of not reading the thread <grin>. See my comments below
that post.


>
> It is also advisable to setup Proof in PS > View > Proof Set Up to the
> Printer/Paper Profile, so that you will be able to get an impression of how
> the Picture will look after it has been printed. Only do the setting up when
> no Image is open in PS.


I did go through that process. Maybe this printer just does not have the
proper profiles for setting up properly. It could also be that I'm not
using Epson paper (quite likely)in which case maybe I'll just have to
fudge something like that gamma to change brightness. I'll need to
reboot & make a few tests, check all the settings again, then I'll
report back.


>
> For Print work, it is advisable to select Adobe RGB as the Work Space for


Yep, I'm using Adobe RGB.
February 17, 2005 3:01:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi Paul.

There was only one posting from you when I sent off my last one, and that is
the one that I was replying to.

You seemed to be advocating sRGB as the Profile to use in PS Print Space,
but I may have misread you.

If your Printer Driver only has the main Printer Profile, and does not
include any Paper & Printer Profiles, then you will have a major problem
trying to use PS to make the conversions. Your best bet, as you have already
worked out, would be to get the conversions done by the Printer and use its
printing options to get correct colour. The Proof view will not be much
help, without the right profile.

That is why I traded up to the 1290, because the Photo 700 did not have any
Paper profiles available, and I could not get decent colour without them.

Watch out for 1290, and perhaps 2200, prices dropping to very low levels
soon.

Best of luck



"paul" <paul@not.net> wrote in message
news:58SdnUNEkYtE5I7fRVn-pQ@speakeasy.net...
> Roy wrote:
>
>> Hi Paul.
>>
>> My first reply to Dave gave the Workflow most people use, and he seems to
>> agree with me that it does work. I can make good quality prints first
>> time,
>
> Heh, I'm guilty of not reading the thread <grin>. See my comments below
> that post.
>
>
>>
>> It is also advisable to setup Proof in PS > View > Proof Set Up to the
>> Printer/Paper Profile, so that you will be able to get an impression of
>> how the Picture will look after it has been printed. Only do the setting
>> up when no Image is open in PS.
>
>
> I did go through that process. Maybe this printer just does not have the
> proper profiles for setting up properly. It could also be that I'm not
> using Epson paper (quite likely)in which case maybe I'll just have to
> fudge something like that gamma to change brightness. I'll need to reboot
> & make a few tests, check all the settings again, then I'll report back.
>
>
>>
>> For Print work, it is advisable to select Adobe RGB as the Work Space for
>
>
> Yep, I'm using Adobe RGB.
>
>
February 17, 2005 3:01:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ah thanks, so I'll just fiddle with the controls till I like it &
concentrate on doing it right with a 1290 or 2200. The C80 was just $150
and made lots of letter sized prints to please me for a while but the
banding can be really bad in the sky especially as it ages.


Roy wrote:

> Hi Paul.
>
> You seemed to be advocating sRGB as the Profile to use in PS Print Space,
> but I may have misread you.


I've got Adobe RGB coming out of the camera, keep it as my working space
and let the printer convert it.



>
> If your Printer Driver only has the main Printer Profile, and does not
> include any Paper & Printer Profiles, then you will have a major problem
> trying to use PS to make the conversions. Your best bet, as you have already
> worked out, would be to get the conversions done by the Printer and use its
> printing options to get correct colour. The Proof view will not be much
> help, without the right profile.
>
> That is why I traded up to the 1290, because the Photo 700 did not have any
> Paper profiles available, and I could not get decent colour without them.
>
> Watch out for 1290, and perhaps 2200, prices dropping to very low levels
> soon.
>
> Best of luck
>
>
>
> "paul" <paul@not.net> wrote in message
> news:58SdnUNEkYtE5I7fRVn-pQ@speakeasy.net...
>
>>Roy wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Hi Paul.
>>>
>>>My first reply to Dave gave the Workflow most people use, and he seems to
>>>agree with me that it does work. I can make good quality prints first
>>>time,
>>
>>Heh, I'm guilty of not reading the thread <grin>. See my comments below
>>that post.
>>
>>
>>
>>>It is also advisable to setup Proof in PS > View > Proof Set Up to the
>>>Printer/Paper Profile, so that you will be able to get an impression of
>>>how the Picture will look after it has been printed. Only do the setting
>>>up when no Image is open in PS.
>>
>>
>>I did go through that process. Maybe this printer just does not have the
>>proper profiles for setting up properly. It could also be that I'm not
>>using Epson paper (quite likely)in which case maybe I'll just have to
>>fudge something like that gamma to change brightness. I'll need to reboot
>>& make a few tests, check all the settings again, then I'll report back.
>>
>>
>>
>>>For Print work, it is advisable to select Adobe RGB as the Work Space for
>>
>>
>>Yep, I'm using Adobe RGB.
>>
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
February 17, 2005 3:50:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
news:znJQd.638$Yj2.198@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
> Hi Paul.
>
> My first reply to Dave gave the Workflow most people use, and he seems to
> agree with me that it does work. I can make good quality prints first
> time, and only ever need to reprint to correct faults (very rarely colour
> balance) I did not notice while I was editing.

HI, you know it's working great - the only funny thing is: when I finally
get to the print preview - where I have just one more click before the
printer starts its thing, the preview color has a bad pink cast. But it
prints fine - just the preview is whacked. Any ideas what's going on here?

Thanks again!
February 17, 2005 3:50:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dave R knows who wrote:
> "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:znJQd.638$Yj2.198@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
>
>>Hi Paul.
>>
>>My first reply to Dave gave the Workflow most people use, and he seems to
>>agree with me that it does work. I can make good quality prints first
>>time, and only ever need to reprint to correct faults (very rarely colour
>>balance) I did not notice while I was editing.
>
>
> HI, you know it's working great - the only funny thing is: when I finally
> get to the print preview - where I have just one more click before the
> printer starts its thing, the preview color has a bad pink cast. But it
> prints fine - just the preview is whacked. Any ideas what's going on here?


One of those pages said the epson print preview is pretty worthless
color wise. I just use it for a last test to see how it sits on the page
& such.


>
> Thanks again!
>
>
!