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Will I be able to handle upgrade from 9800GT to 460GTX?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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January 28, 2011 9:47:49 AM

Hey there,

So I'm not entirely sure which form factor I'm using: Micro-ATX or Mini-ATX but I'm using a Intel DG35-EC motherboard. I've been using a Palit 9800GT green for a while and it's given me quite a lotta trouble over the past year and a half, so when it went down again this time, I told my vendor to get me a newer card as a replacement and I would pony up the difference. Since I'm stuck with nVidia, I thought of either the GTS 450 or the GTX 460 (if the difference they quote is not too much).

I wanted to know firstly, if it would fit into my mother board because they have it listed as a dual-slot card on the nVidia website while the 9800GT is listed as a single slot card (not sure what they mean by that frankly) and moreover, the 9800GT was sitting pretty snugly in there so I don't know how big a card the cabinet will handle.

Secondly, by any chance, would either of the above-mentioned replacement cards run on a 400W PS (which I have) or would I need to get a replacement for that as well (both cards are rated as 450W)?

Any input would be appreciated. Thanks a lot.

Z

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a b U Graphics card
January 28, 2011 9:56:35 AM

I would suggest you get a better PSU before you think about a graphics card upgrade.

You can get some very solid and very good value PSU's nowadays, i'd stick to vendors such as Corsair, Antec, OCZ and Silverstone.

If you're just planning on having one card in the system, then a 500 - 550W one will suit you fine.

The 460's are quite short, between 7 and 9" depending on the vendor, be aware that the majority of them use co-axial fans rather than blower fans, meaning that the hot air from the GPU stays in the case to be gotten rid of by the case fans. If your case hasn't got the best cooling, i would suggest getting a blower fan card (EVGA do one).

With regard to dual slot vs single slot cards. The 460's are dual slot cards (as are most gaming level cards), so long as you have a free slot below the PCI-E slot that your graphics card will go into, you'll be just fine.
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January 28, 2011 10:37:09 AM

personally i do not recommend you waste your time with a 460, when you can have a 560 overclocked for about $260.
http://www.evga.com/products/moreinfo.asp?pn=01G-P3-156...
as for the PSU a cheep 600w ran my 570 without a problem, $39 cheep for that matter.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
so for $300 minus your discount, you have a formidable system.
the 560 is 9" and vents the hot air, OUTSIDE the case.

dual slots means it uses the next slot lower as an exhaust, as well as a adjoining slot for cooling.
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a b U Graphics card
January 28, 2011 11:24:05 AM

The 560 as mentioned by scoobertdoo is also a good choice, but considerably more expensive than the 460 (if money is an issue).

However i am inclined to disagree with the 'cheap PSU' point put forward, cheap = nasty, nasty = high chance of blowing your system.

While some may testify to cheap PSU's never blowing, luck may have played a significant part in that. I stick by my recommendation of a known-brand, solidly rated one.
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a b U Graphics card
January 28, 2011 11:59:52 AM

definatley get a new psu and either a gtx 460 and if you can afford it the gtx 560, its not worth running nice components on some crap psu
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January 28, 2011 3:43:55 PM

there are reasons for cheep GPU's. people who want to save cash on building a ok pc.
a cheap PSU failing will not ruin a PC, i should know, i blew one up.
my pc is fine.
i doubt under normal use they would be unlikely to fail.
read the reviews before you buy one.
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January 28, 2011 4:58:20 PM

scoobertdoo said:
there are reasons for cheep GPU's. people who want to save cash on building a ok pc.
a cheap PSU failing will not ruin a PC, i should know, i blew one up.
my pc is fine
.
i doubt under normal use they would be unlikely to fail.
read the reviews before you buy one.



Well apparently you didn't blow enough of them to have experience with a PSU frying your motherboard!

I have, it's a fifty fifty shot of your board getting screwed by your PSU and a few other components hitting the fry pan as well.
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a b U Graphics card
January 28, 2011 11:29:35 PM

it can definatley happen but most of the time it does not, your system will just shut down, I made it a habit a long time ago not to use crap psus anymore so I havent expirirenced a failure or shortcoming in a long time, bottom line, the psu is worth investing a decent amount of money in
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January 29, 2011 1:31:56 AM

^+1 what he said is spot on, or you can go through some and learn the hard way!
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February 8, 2011 5:02:52 AM

Best answer selected by zubinmaster.
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February 8, 2011 5:05:44 AM

Thanks guys. So I went and took someone's advice over here and got the 560GTX with a good brand 500W PSU. I did end up spending more than I was planning to but it's a one time thing, so what the hell.

Now I can not have time to game at even higher resolutions!!!! Yay!!!
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