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Laptop Or Desktop for uni

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April 2, 2011 10:42:18 PM

studying computer science for business at uni in october

was wondering which would be best
custom built pc
or laptop considering the msi gx 660r i5 460m 6gb ddr3 1tb hdd (2 x 500gb raid 0)

More about : laptop desktop uni

April 2, 2011 11:00:00 PM

If you are working on projects that require lots of horsepower then a desktop is a much better option. What kind of projects would you likely be working on?
April 3, 2011 12:10:03 AM

jprahman said:
If you are working on projects that require lots of horsepower then a desktop is a much better option. What kind of projects would you likely be working on?



it will mainly be programming (java) and some xhtml php along with general computer science tasks

also personal use : GAMING :) 
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April 3, 2011 3:55:28 AM

As long as you aren't doing any heavy duty work with large and/or compute heavy projects a laptop will be fine for java development and html/php. The gaming part, however, would be better on a desktop.

I would personally recommend going with the desktop, in part for the gaming, but also for the extra horsepower a desktop will give. However, you may also want to be able to take your PC to class or around campus, in which case a laptop would be a better choice.

Basically it's portability vs. performance. The desktop will run things faster, but the laptop will do decently as well. It's just a matter of how much you value having something fast vs. something portable.
April 3, 2011 4:21:46 AM

If you can manage the budget, I would strongly recommend both. Build your powerhouse home PC to do everything that you want it to do, and then go bare bones on your laptop so that you just have something to take for lecture.

While many of your CS classes will be labs with their own workstations, you have to consider that you will be taking many other courses as well as plenty of CS lectures which will include copious amounts of note taking and more PowerPoint presentations than you ever thought possible. Having a laptop to provides a great platform to both view the PowerPoint (many professors post them before lecture) with a clear view and the ability to go back to a previous slide if the professor moves ahead too quickly, as well as take notes on the lecture at hand. I use one almost every day at Uni and do not know how others get by without them (Pencil and paper? Ha!). Again, it does not have to be powerful at all (only really need to run MS Office) so the cost can be kept to a minimum.
April 3, 2011 6:23:05 AM

+1 to above

A desktop paired with a low powered net-book is the best choice. Its what one of my friends has been using and he swears by it. And if you're looking at the G660r it looks expensive around £900, take off £250 for a good netbook and £650 will still give you a good desktop.

Speaking from experience you're not going to want to lug the MSI about ,its 3.5kg! before you add the adaptor weight, and i know i'm always taking my laptop into uni and i think its heavy at 2.7kg. Also the netbook is going to have a better battery life.
April 3, 2011 6:36:33 AM

Agreed on the additional comment of it being a net-book. They have lost a lot of their mainstream steam since the boom of the tablet market, but for Uni they are a perfect fit. Low cost, light weight, and good battery life.

I personally have a 15" Macbook Pro that I take to school each day and for the first two years of Uni it doubled as my home computer. It does not have the power I really need at home (which led me to build my computer recently) and it is heavier and more power hungry than I'd prefer for school use. Its amazing what a few pounds turn into when you are carrying them over two pressure points (backpack straps) for a day.
a b D Laptop
April 3, 2011 6:59:03 AM

Dorms? Don't forget that no matter what route you take, you'll want to be able to secure it. Locks, etc.
April 3, 2011 8:00:36 AM

metal orient said:
+1 to above

A desktop paired with a low powered net-book is the best choice. Its what one of my friends has been using and he swears by it. And if you're looking at the G660r it looks expensive around £900, take off £250 for a good netbook and £650 will still give you a good desktop.

Speaking from experience you're not going to want to lug the MSI about ,its 3.5kg! before you add the adaptor weight, and i know i'm always taking my laptop into uni and i think its heavy at 2.7kg. Also the netbook is going to have a better battery life.



I already Have a decent enough laptop, and my plan was to build my own desktop. And if im able to i wont to be able to get the gx 660r as well as build my own desktop. If that doesn't work out it could either be build my own desktop and keep the laptop i have already or simply buy the msi gx660r.

April 3, 2011 8:01:13 AM

JamesAllen said:
If you can manage the budget, I would strongly recommend both. Build your powerhouse home PC to do everything that you want it to do, and then go bare bones on your laptop so that you just have something to take for lecture.

While many of your CS classes will be labs with their own workstations, you have to consider that you will be taking many other courses as well as plenty of CS lectures which will include copious amounts of note taking and more PowerPoint presentations than you ever thought possible. Having a laptop to provides a great platform to both view the PowerPoint (many professors post them before lecture) with a clear view and the ability to go back to a previous slide if the professor moves ahead too quickly, as well as take notes on the lecture at hand. I use one almost every day at Uni and do not know how others get by without them (Pencil and paper? Ha!). Again, it does not have to be powerful at all (only really need to run MS Office) so the cost can be kept to a minimum.


Thanks for the help :0

I already Have a decent enough laptop, and my plan was to build my own desktop. And if im able to i wont to be able to get the gx 660r as well as build my own desktop. If that doesn't work out it could either be build my own desktop and keep the laptop i have already or simply buy the msi gx660r.
April 3, 2011 8:03:08 AM

jprahman said:
As long as you aren't doing any heavy duty work with large and/or compute heavy projects a laptop will be fine for java development and html/php. The gaming part, however, would be better on a desktop.

I would personally recommend going with the desktop, in part for the gaming, but also for the extra horsepower a desktop will give. However, you may also want to be able to take your PC to class or around campus, in which case a laptop would be a better choice.

Basically it's portability vs. performance. The desktop will run things faster, but the laptop will do decently as well. It's just a matter of how much you value having something fast vs. something portable.



yes thats right its if i want portability or performance although the laptop will still be able to provide me with decent enough horsepower along with being able to handle most games.
April 3, 2011 8:06:58 AM

xmx_23 said:
Thanks for the help :0

I already Have a decent enough laptop, and my plan was to build my own desktop. And if im able to i wont to be able to get the gx 660r as well as build my own desktop. If that doesn't work out it could either be build my own desktop and keep the laptop i have already or simply buy the msi gx660r.


If you already have a decent laptop why are you considering buying another? A desktop is surely the better choice.
April 3, 2011 8:09:26 AM

metal orient said:
+1 to above

A desktop paired with a low powered net-book is the best choice. Its what one of my friends has been using and he swears by it. And if you're looking at the G660r it looks expensive around £900, take off £250 for a good netbook and £650 will still give you a good desktop.

Speaking from experience you're not going to want to lug the MSI about ,its 3.5kg! before you add the adaptor weight, and i know i'm always taking my laptop into uni and i think its heavy at 2.7kg. Also the netbook is going to have a better battery life.


Thanks


The weight of the laptop is a slight issue but it doesn't bother me to much. ideally i would like the gx660r and a custom built system which im trying to do. If i did decide to go with a laptop , i doubt i would need it for practical lessons in labs but for lectures i could use it to take notes. I have heard that not many people use laptops in lectures to take notes and simply use pen and paper.
April 3, 2011 8:12:48 AM

metal orient said:
If you already have a decent laptop why are you considering buying another? A desktop is surely the better choice.



The main reason a laptop came into the equation is due to my freinds all getting one, seeing as they already have desktops they wanted to purchase a powerful laptop. They plan on not taking their desktops and simply take the laptop hence how the topic came about.

My original plan was to build my own desktop and keep the laptop i have now :) ...
April 3, 2011 8:14:09 AM

2291993,8,71107 said:
Dorms? Don't forget that no matter what route you take, you'll want to be able to secure it. Locks, etc.[/quotemsg

yes dorms :)  I have already considered how i will secure either the laptop or desktop.
April 3, 2011 8:18:55 AM

xmx_23 said:
The main reason a laptop came into the equation is due to my freinds all getting one, seeing as they already have desktops they wanted to purchase a powerful laptop. They plan on not taking their desktops and simply take the laptop hence how the topic came about.

My original plan was to build my own desktop and keep the laptop i have now :) ...


I'd go with that, unless you have a real lack of space in your room a desktop should fit fine. You won't need much computing power from your laptop if you have a good desktop in your room and good workstations at uni.
The fact you won't have to lug about a heavy laptop will be blessing in itself, and as i'm sure you're aware a new desktop is alot cheaper.
April 3, 2011 8:31:32 AM

metal orient said:
I'd go with that, unless you have a real lack of space in your room a desktop should fit fine. You won't need much computing power from your laptop if you have a good desktop in your room and good workstations at uni.
The fact you won't have to lug about a heavy laptop will be blessing in itself, and as i'm sure you're aware a new desktop is alot cheaper.



I am aware that a desktop would be the cheaper option and have already roughly planned out and costed my build prior to the laptop coming in the scene:) 
a b D Laptop
April 3, 2011 5:08:06 PM

While CAD would be considered a demanding application, we use mostly laptops as in most instances, the extra desktop horsepower pales to the advantages of portability. Ideally you'd have access t both but if you ahve to choose one of the other, I'd recommend an Sandy Bridge .... If you need long periods away from a plug, look for one with Optimus technology.

here's a convenient location to look at the various models all on one page:

http://www.pro-star.com/index.cfm?mainpage=product&filt...

To find a reseller in your area look here:

http://forum.notebookreview.com/sager-clevo/91510-clevo...

April 4, 2011 4:59:03 AM

Netbooks came out about 4 months after I started university. I am still disappointed that they didn't come out sooner, because I found that the best combination is a desktop for power, and a netbook for portability. About 90% of the time I used my laptop as a desktop, and I sure missed the ability to just pop in a new HDD or easily upgrade the GPU. I have also found that laptops almost always die approximately 3 years after you buy them, desktops tend to run much longer than that.

When my laptop started dying recently, I decided to buy a desktop and then will be getting a netbook in a couple months. In the end I'm getting a netbook, desktop and new monitor for about the same price I would pay for a laptop that I would be happy with, and I am guessing this desktop is going to last me a lot longer.
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