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3D - Support

Tags:
  • Graphics Cards
  • Support
  • 3D
  • Graphics
  • Displays
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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January 31, 2011 1:42:31 PM

i was looking at the specs of ATI Radeon™ HD 5770.
Where it mentions - 3D stereoscopic display/glasses support. (Requires 3D stereo drivers, glasses, and display.)

What I am building is My own HiDef media-gaming PC. I was trying to explore the option of viewing 3D movies, ect. and I have a few basic questions...
1. Do I need a display device capable of showing 3D? Would a HiDef 720p or 1080p monitor suffice?
2. I read a bit about stereoscopic images, and I understood that breaking up the Graphics into left and right eye images is what provides this ability. I presume this processing is essentially done by a graphics card. So from my understanding, a HiDef monitor, a capable processor & the graphics card should do it. No need to spend crazy money on an expensive large 3D TV. :kaola:  Am I right or have i missed something?
3. If yes, then i can use my comp to view 3D movies on a HiDef TV.

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a b U Graphics card
January 31, 2011 2:19:36 PM

1. You need special 120Hz monitors to display the 3D, a good number are available now but expect to pay more than average.

2. Yes the processing is done on the GPU, it puts more strain on it as its having to render twice the frames it normally would, so expect a performance hit compared to 2D.

3. If the TV supports full 3D 1080p (1080p at 120Hz rather than 60Hz) then i would suspect so, yes.
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a b U Graphics card
January 31, 2011 2:37:06 PM

Only a 3d TV will work, even if you have a 120hz 1080p TV it's not going to be capable of 3D unless it has HDMI 1.4b or a dual link dvi input. Most TVs that advertise as 120hz don't actually have any 120hz inputs, they just interpolate frames on standard HDTV broadcasts, so no you will not be able to watch 3d movies on a regular HD TV.

Also the 5770 does not have HDMI 1.4 so even if you had an expensive 3d TV you wouldn't be able to use your PC to output 3d movies or games to it.

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a b U Graphics card
January 31, 2011 2:51:46 PM

That's what I meant when i said 120Hz 3D TV, i didn't even think about the interpolation that is also rated in Hz.

All in all, you're going to need a lot of money to make this work.
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January 31, 2011 4:32:49 PM

Damn!
Would I be able to watch it on a monitor? I saw many tv's with 120Hz (philips), but i guess they lack the required input, there was not much info on it on their website.

I tried googling on 1.4b, but not much info on it. Is it a new format?
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a c 365 U Graphics card
January 31, 2011 4:59:24 PM

3D HDTVs operates in 48Hz mode; 24Hz for each eye.
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a b U Graphics card
January 31, 2011 6:21:14 PM

And that should have been HDMI 1.4a not 1.4b. Sorry for the confusion.

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February 1, 2011 4:14:40 AM

allright...so what would be the requirement to watch 3D on
1. A PC - monitor.
2. A Projector.
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a b U Graphics card
February 1, 2011 12:26:02 PM

You're better off with an Nvidia card and the 3d vision kit with glasses and emmitter, then you just pick a monitor or projector from here:
http://www.nvidia.com/object/3D-Vision-Requirements.htm...

If you're wanting to play 3d blu ray's you will also need the drive of course and cyberlink power DVD 10 or some other software for 3d blu ray playback.
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February 1, 2011 4:08:32 PM

whats an emmitter?
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a b U Graphics card
February 3, 2011 2:05:21 PM

the emmitter is the thing that connects to the pc or is built into the TV that sends out an IR signal to tell the glasses when to blink each eye to synch with the screen, it comes with the nvidia glasses kit. 3d tvs have it built into the set usually.


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February 28, 2011 4:25:40 PM

Best answer selected by ohshaq.
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