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I7 2600k overheating

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July 14, 2011 7:00:08 AM

Hi. i just built my first computer. Everything looked fine, except the processor overheating. I got watercooler corsair H60, installed it properly, but when turned on computer, bios showed me 97C. I freaked out, turned it off. than waited for it to cool down, and give another chance - i turned it on. after 2 seconds after i pressed the power botton, it clicked and turned off. I thought maybe its faulty H60, so i switched it to the fan that came with the i7 package. Turned it on, it showed 57C, and every minute it went up by 1C... I turned it off at about 60, few minutes later trying to turn it on, it wont.. same click, and off. now even after half an hour, it still wont turn on, just the same way as before.. im freaking out...

My build is
Intel Core i7 2600K Boxed Processor 2nd Generation Sandy Bridge CPU
Asus P8P67 B3 Intel P67 S1155 Motherboard
DDR3 8GB (2x4GB) 1333MHz with XMS Heat Spreader, CORSAIR CMX8GX3M2A1333C9
Western Digital Caviar
Cooler Master HAF 922M Mid Tower ATX Computer Case 1TB SATA Hard Drive * Black * [/url]
Cooler Master GX Series 750W Power Supply
http://www.frys.com/product/6282030?site=sr:SEARCH:MAIN..." target="_blank">PNY Geforce 210 1GB

Help me.. i really dont know what else to do. Thank you
Anya

More about : 2600k overheating

a b à CPUs
July 14, 2011 8:21:32 AM

During installation of the processor to the motherboard, have you check thoroughly for small particles or dust that might have accumulated on the motherboard's processors slot. Maybe a small dust has gone in those small pins.
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July 14, 2011 9:30:10 AM

Did you use termal compound? Is the fan spinning? is the heatsink actually hot to the touch?
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a b à CPUs
July 14, 2011 3:31:49 PM

(1) @ about 97 C the CPU should have started to shutdown.
(2) 2 causes - A. Improper HSF installation (normally not good thermal contact between CPU and HS. B. Uncommon but possible -= did you note when looking @ health page in BIOS what the voltages were. The two important ones Vcore (should have been < 1.3 (Closer to 1 V) and the +12 V

On Stock HSF:
Although a lousy HSF, it is adaquate. Several have reported that with the stock HSF they have seen 60->65C while in BIOS, but it drops once the system has booted into the operating system (primary reason is that in BIOS the CPU is operated at stock speed, but once the operating system takes over the speed is dropped to idle).

First Verify that the Stock HSF is installed correctly.
Remove, clean off thermal paste. Reapply thermal past (Recommend pea size of Artic silver 5 which you spead evenly in CPU. Reattach the HSF - VERIFING that all four push pins are properly seated (Should see the white nubs on back side. - This is very common problem whith the stock HSF). This will probably not help as you probably now have a defective part - But should be tried.

PSU-MB-CPU.
Verify that all power connectors to The MB (24 pin and the 4/8 pin ATX) are fully seated. Reseat memory modules.

Look over the MB for a defective component - ie bulged capacitor, any burn/overheating (ie around connectors, resistors, semiconductors).

Now the hard part.
.. Easyist - If you can, Swap out the PSU. I did not see a dedicated GPU. If so remove and use internal IGP. You can use a good PSU that is 400 W or greater. Note: Your system with a single dedicated GPU and a mild OC, a Quality 650 W PSU would have been a grat choice. Alternative is to purchase a PSU tester (Approx $20). Not the greatest as it does not provide much loading).

If the above does not help, I think the best advice is to return the MB and CPU to the vender requesting replacement - With a properly mounted stock HSF the indications are quite possibly a defective voltage regulator causing the CPU to over heat.

It is possible in your first attempt with the H60, if it was not properly installed, you have damaged the MB, and or the CPU- possibly both.


..
The 3 Primary Components.

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July 14, 2011 6:43:11 PM

venjhammet said:
During installation of the processor to the motherboard, have you check thoroughly for small particles or dust that might have accumulated on the motherboard's processors slot. Maybe a small dust has gone in those small pins.

- I remember that it was all clean


tokencode said:
Did you use termal compound? Is the fan spinning? is the heatsink actually hot to the touch?

- the on stock hsf had compound on it already. the fan was spinning, the heatsink was warm


RetiredChief said:
(1) @ about 97 C the CPU should have started to shutdown.
(2) 2 causes - A. Improper HSF installation (normally not good thermal contact between CPU and HS. B. Uncommon but possible -= did you note when looking @ health page in BIOS what the voltages were. The two important ones Vcore (should have been < 1.3 (Closer to 1 V) and the +12 V

On Stock HSF:
Although a lousy HSF, it is adaquate. Several have reported that with the stock HSF they have seen 60->65C while in BIOS, but it drops once the system has booted into the operating system (primary reason is that in BIOS the CPU is operated at stock speed, but once the operating system takes over the speed is dropped to idle).

First Verify that the Stock HSF is installed correctly.
Remove, clean off thermal paste. Reapply thermal past (Recommend pea size of Artic silver 5 which you spead evenly in CPU. Reattach the HSF - VERIFING that all four push pins are properly seated (Should see the white nubs on back side. - This is very common problem whith the stock HSF). This will probably not help as you probably now have a defective part - But should be tried.

PSU-MB-CPU.
Verify that all power connectors to The MB (24 pin and the 4/8 pin ATX) are fully seated. Reseat memory modules.

Look over the MB for a defective component - ie bulged capacitor, any burn/overheating (ie around connectors, resistors, semiconductors).

Now the hard part.
.. Easyist - If you can, Swap out the PSU. I did not see a dedicated GPU. If so remove and use internal IGP. You can use a good PSU that is 400 W or greater. Note: Your system with a single dedicated GPU and a mild OC, a Quality 650 W PSU would have been a grat choice. Alternative is to purchase a PSU tester (Approx $20). Not the greatest as it does not provide much loading).

If the above does not help, I think the best advice is to return the MB and CPU to the vender requesting replacement - With a properly mounted stock HSF the indications are quite possibly a defective voltage regulator causing the CPU to over heat.

It is possible in your first attempt with the H60, if it was not properly installed, you have damaged the MB, and or the CPU- possibly both.


..
The 3 Primary Components.



Unfortunately, i did not look at the voltage when i was able to turn on the computer.

I cant check now, but im pretty sure that i checked the HSF pins were all properly seated, the white nubs were all evenly out, sticking from another side of MB.

About connectors, i remember i reseated them like 5 times.

I have a 500W PSU in my old computer, do you think i should try that 1?
:sweat:  What i do with the tester? what do i need to look out for?

Today after school will go to the store to purchase the compound. I got the mobo/processor warranty for 1 replacement, wouldn't want to lose it in 1 day after i purchased it. Also i called to the store, asking about overheating, they said "bring it in, we will look at it for 70$" :o 


Thank you
Anya
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a b à CPUs
July 14, 2011 8:02:06 PM

The 500 W PSU should be fine as long as it has the 24 Pin MB connectors Some of the older PSU's came with a 20 Pin MB connector and not sure if the added 4 pins will make a difference. If the added pins are shorted on the MB to the respective other Voltage pins, then probably OK. The 4/8 pin ATX power connector, don't know if you used 8 Pins, but 4 pin should be fine for a 95 W CPU.

On PSU tester. Her is a example: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168....

These tester are more of a go-no-go tester. I prefer to test under load using a DVM (Less than $20 @ Walmart). But the DVM and under load will only work on a system that powers up. I recommend anyone building and/or working on computers get a DVM. They come in very handy around the house and the car. They are very simple to use.
http://www.wikihow.com/Use-a-Multimeter
or
Google "using a voltmeter" there are other sites plus a you tube video.
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July 14, 2011 11:21:28 PM

I checked the motherboard, didnt see any builging, cant check for overheating, since im not sure if it will turn on.. and dont think i should try.
Dont have chance to buy compound today, do you think its possible to just check it without doing re-set up of the fan?

Thank you
Anya
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a b à CPUs
July 14, 2011 11:53:21 PM

At this point, don't see any harm in tring. The "overheating I was talking about is on The MB and components. Look for discoloration on Resistors and "scorched marks near MB connectors, around CPU and Mosfet (Voltage regulators).
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July 15, 2011 12:52:06 AM

Tried other PSU, still turns on for 2 seconds and goes off... and yes, i checked there is no discoloration on mobo.. atlest the places that i can see
I think i might just return it all, and suck it up, keep using my old pc...
BUT... now after taking off the PSU from it, when it turns on, screen still shows that nothing connected to it. I even tried with another monitor, and same thing... could have i damaged something or something else? i reconnected all wires and everuthing.. it just wont show... oh... keyboard and mouse dont work too

Thank you
Anya
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July 22, 2011 1:52:17 AM

Best answer selected by amnes1a.
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a b à CPUs
July 22, 2011 12:35:20 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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