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Can I run laptop on Ac power all the time?

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April 28, 2005 11:32:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

have never owned a laptop before

Thinking of getting one

Chances are it will be running off Ac power most of the
time

Will this damage the batteries in anyway?

If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off
120v wall current somehow without batteries being in
unit? And then only insert the battery pack when going
mobile with it?

More about : run laptop power time

April 28, 2005 11:35:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>have never owned a laptop before
>
>Thinking of getting one
>
>Chances are it will be running off Ac power most of the
>time
>
>Will this damage the batteries in anyway?
>
>If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off
>120v wall current somehow without batteries being in
>unit? And then only insert the battery pack when going
>mobile with it?

One other question...

If I should buy a smallish laptop.... and would want a
bigger screen....can I get a standalone desktop display
and plug my laptop into it if wanting more display real
estate?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 28, 2005 11:35:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

me@privacy.net writes:
> >Chances are it will be running off Ac power most of the time
> >Will this damage the batteries in anyway?

Opinions are divided about this. I use my laptop that way and usually
leave the batteries in. My current machine hasn't killed the battery
in over 3 years of operation, a lot of it powered and running 24/7. I
don't know if the capacity has diminished but at least the battery
isn't dead. On the other hand I've killed batteries in other machines
and I'm not sure if this is the reason.

> >If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off 120v wall
> >current somehow without batteries being in unit? And then only
> >insert the battery pack when going mobile with it?

You could do that but it's a little bit awkward. The laptop feels
a bit strange with the battery gone, and also, with a laptop, it's
easy to knock the AC power cord loose. With the battery installed,
the laptop just keeps running and you plug it back in.

> If I should buy a smallish laptop.... and would want a bigger
> screen....can I get a standalone desktop display and plug my laptop
> into it if wanting more display real estate?

Generally speaking, yes, you get an analog VGA output which won't
be as sharp as a DVI output but it's still useful.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 29, 2005 12:56:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid&gt; wrote in message
news:7xll72pged.fsf@ruckus.brouhaha.com...
> me@privacy.net writes:
>> >Chances are it will be running off Ac power most of the time
>> >Will this damage the batteries in anyway?
>
> Opinions are divided about this. I use my laptop that way and usually
> leave the batteries in. My current machine hasn't killed the battery
> in over 3 years of operation, a lot of it powered and running 24/7. I
> don't know if the capacity has diminished but at least the battery
> isn't dead. On the other hand I've killed batteries in other machines
> and I'm not sure if this is the reason.

Certainly leaving a battery in a laptop plugged in keeps the battery in poor
condition if you want to preserve it. LiIon batteries need to be kept at
40% and low temp for them to last longest. However, they don't last long
anyway.

>> >If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off 120v wall
>> >current somehow without batteries being in unit? And then only
>> >insert the battery pack when going mobile with it?
>
> You could do that but it's a little bit awkward. The laptop feels
> a bit strange with the battery gone, and also, with a laptop, it's
> easy to knock the AC power cord loose. With the battery installed,
> the laptop just keeps running and you plug it back in.

Good point - particularly if you laptop power lead has a funny lump on it
which catches the table edge perfectly.

>
>> If I should buy a smallish laptop.... and would want a bigger
>> screen....can I get a standalone desktop display and plug my laptop
>> into it if wanting more display real estate?
>
> Generally speaking, yes, you get an analog VGA output which won't
> be as sharp as a DVI output but it's still useful.

It depends for how large the display is and how far away it is. If the
display is, say, 17 inch flatscreen, next to your computer, there shouldn't
be any difference. If you're going for, say, a 23" widescreen, then DVI is
required. If you don't have DVI on the laptop, have a look on a docking
station for it.

Duncan.
April 29, 2005 5:37:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

<me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:b20371ludo0n570kgt980tqe1a8r0c7mha@4ax.com...
> have never owned a laptop before
>
> Thinking of getting one
>
> Chances are it will be running off Ac power most of the
> time
>
> Will this damage the batteries in anyway?
>
> If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off
> 120v wall current somehow without batteries being in
> unit? And then only insert the battery pack when going
> mobile with it?

While shopping notebooks look into docking stations.
April 29, 2005 5:37:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>> If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off
>> 120v wall current somehow without batteries being in
>> unit? And then only insert the battery pack when going
>> mobile with it?
>
>While shopping notebooks look into docking stations.

I see

Does a docking station let one use the laptop without
the batteries in it?
April 29, 2005 5:37:10 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

yes
<me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:kgh4719bv633ll8ho480spdb02m2jd0qdn@4ax.com...
>>> If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off
>>> 120v wall current somehow without batteries being in
>>> unit? And then only insert the battery pack when going
>>> mobile with it?
>>
>>While shopping notebooks look into docking stations.
>
> I see
>
> Does a docking station let one use the laptop without
> the batteries in it?
April 29, 2005 5:38:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Duncan J Murray"
<duncan.murray@remove.this.bit.medical-school.and.this.bit.oxford.ac.uk>
wrote in message news:D 4spbl$iha$1@news.ox.ac.uk...
>
<snip>
>
> Good point - particularly if you laptop power lead has a funny lump on it
> which catches the table edge perfectly.
>
<snip>
>
> Duncan.
>
I think it's a noise filter.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 30, 2005 5:18:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

me@privacy.net wrote:

> Does a docking station let one use the laptop without
> the batteries in it?

I don't see why you need a docking station. My laptop runs all the time
w/no battery. I thought this was a feature of all laptops...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 30, 2005 7:21:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Michael Lee wrote:
> me@privacy.net wrote:
>
> > Does a docking station let one use the laptop without
> > the batteries in it?
>
> I don't see why you need a docking station. My laptop runs all the
time
> w/no battery. I thought this was a feature of all laptops...

I think it depends on the kind of battery. My old laptop had an
internal battery, and while it would run without a battery, the AC cord
would fall out easily. So, my mostly dead battery was kept inside just
to keep the computer from shutting off. It would run about 10 minutes
and beep to let me know.

My newer laptop is different. The battery is part of the outside base
of the computer, so it would be rather odd not to have it in while it
is running.

As far as the docking station, that was in answer to the monitor
question. It's much nicer, since you can leave the monitor plugged into
the docking station, as well as any other items. Then just take the
laptop with you when you want to go. No wasted time unhooking and later
redoing the cords. I have my laptop in a docking station. It shares the
keyboard and monitor with my desktop computer. I just have extension
cables plugged into the docking station. I also have a mouse, scanner,
printer, and extension USB cable permanently plugged into the docking
station. I have a monitor stand on top of it, then the scanner on top
of that. I don't even need to open the laptop. I just push the power
button on the docking station, and I am ready to go. When I want to
take the laptop out, I just eject it from teh docking station and go.
If you plan to work the laptop as a desktop part of the time, a
docking station is definitely the way to go.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 30, 2005 2:23:45 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

<me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:b20371ludo0n570kgt980tqe1a8r0c7mha@4ax.com...
> have never owned a laptop before
>
> Thinking of getting one
>
> Chances are it will be running off Ac power most of the
> time
>
> Will this damage the batteries in anyway?

Huh? Did you mean in any way?

> If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off
> 120v wall current somehow without batteries being in
> unit? And then only insert the battery pack when going
> mobile with it?

Yes. You can run it with the battery.

Barry
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 30, 2005 3:41:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

friesian@zoocrewphoto.com wrote:

> I think it depends on the kind of battery. My old laptop had an
<snip>
> If you plan to work the laptop as a desktop part of the time, a
> docking station is definitely the way to go.

I see, thanks for the reply. I guess I wouldn't need a docking
station.. I got rid of my clunky desktop + accessories and replaced it
w/just the laptop. I don't even use a mouse w/it anymore and my
printer's connected to my wireless router.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 1, 2005 4:00:56 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Yes, the consensus of experience is that continuous running on AC will
damage the batteries, and will essentially destroy them over 9 to 24
months. Not always, and it's not "supposed" to happen, but there have
been threads on this exact subject thousands of posts long, and the
consensus is that it happens more often than not. It's not clear if the
culprit is overcharging or heat, but it's not good for the batteries.

The usual recommendation is just to remove the batteries (the laptop
will run fine that way). If you want the UPS protection function that
the batteries provide, you can plug the laptop AC supply into an APC
350VA ups that you can buy for $10 to $30 (on sale and usually after a
rebate). Even $30 is a lot less than a lithium laptop battery, which
can sell for over $200.


me@privacy.net wrote:

> have never owned a laptop before
>
> Thinking of getting one
>
> Chances are it will be running off Ac power most of the
> time
>
> Will this damage the batteries in anyway?
>
> If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off
> 120v wall current somehow without batteries being in
> unit? And then only insert the battery pack when going
> mobile with it?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 1, 2005 4:01:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Normally, all laptops have analog VGA monitor sockets for an external
monitor.


me@privacy.net wrote:

>>have never owned a laptop before
>>
>>Thinking of getting one
>>
>>Chances are it will be running off Ac power most of the
>>time
>>
>>Will this damage the batteries in anyway?
>>
>>If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off
>>120v wall current somehow without batteries being in
>>unit? And then only insert the battery pack when going
>>mobile with it?
>
>
> One other question...
>
> If I should buy a smallish laptop.... and would want a
> bigger screen....can I get a standalone desktop display
> and plug my laptop into it if wanting more display real
> estate?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 1, 2005 4:23:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Re: "LiIon batteries need to be kept at 40% and low temp for them to
last longest. However, they don't last long anyway."

Lithium is the most stable and long-life of any battery chemical system.
properly treated, lithium batteries will last 10 years -- in fact, I
just finished testing four Toshiba 2487 batteries made between 1995 and
1997, and they all ran a Toshiba 490CDT (Pentium II) for more than 2
hours. [This was a kind of amazing battery. First used in 1995, it was
still in use at least as late as 2003 (although then called a 3107, with
10% more capacity). Over 100 models of Toshiba laptop use this battery].

You are correct that the battery mfgrs. recommend storage at about
half-charge, but I've always stored them fully charged (out of
ignorance?), and have seen no ill effects from that.

But I've seen these and many other batteries destroyed in under a year
when installed in a machine that was left on AC power 24x7.


Duncan J Murray wrote:

> "Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid&gt; wrote in message
> news:7xll72pged.fsf@ruckus.brouhaha.com...
>
>>me@privacy.net writes:
>>
>>>>Chances are it will be running off Ac power most of the time
>>>>Will this damage the batteries in anyway?
>>
>>Opinions are divided about this. I use my laptop that way and usually
>>leave the batteries in. My current machine hasn't killed the battery
>>in over 3 years of operation, a lot of it powered and running 24/7. I
>>don't know if the capacity has diminished but at least the battery
>>isn't dead. On the other hand I've killed batteries in other machines
>>and I'm not sure if this is the reason.
>
>
> Certainly leaving a battery in a laptop plugged in keeps the battery in poor
> condition if you want to preserve it. LiIon batteries need to be kept at
> 40% and low temp for them to last longest. However, they don't last long
> anyway.
>
>
>>>>If yes...can I remove the battery pack and run it off 120v wall
>>>>current somehow without batteries being in unit? And then only
>>>>insert the battery pack when going mobile with it?
>>
>>You could do that but it's a little bit awkward. The laptop feels
>>a bit strange with the battery gone, and also, with a laptop, it's
>>easy to knock the AC power cord loose. With the battery installed,
>>the laptop just keeps running and you plug it back in.
>
>
> Good point - particularly if you laptop power lead has a funny lump on it
> which catches the table edge perfectly.
>
>
>>>If I should buy a smallish laptop.... and would want a bigger
>>>screen....can I get a standalone desktop display and plug my laptop
>>>into it if wanting more display real estate?
>>
>>Generally speaking, yes, you get an analog VGA output which won't
>>be as sharp as a DVI output but it's still useful.
>
>
> It depends for how large the display is and how far away it is. If the
> display is, say, 17 inch flatscreen, next to your computer, there shouldn't
> be any difference. If you're going for, say, a 23" widescreen, then DVI is
> required. If you don't have DVI on the laptop, have a look on a docking
> station for it.
>
> Duncan.
>
>
May 1, 2005 5:07:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 09:35:19 -0500, me@privacy.net wrote:

>>While shopping notebooks look into docking stations.
>
>Does a docking station let one use the laptop without
>the batteries in it?

You do not need to buy a docking station for the sake
of running your laptop always on AC!

I have half a dozen Thinkpads, and two docking stations.
One of them have spent the last four years or so sitting
in my attic, and that is where the other one is going soon too.

For these 6 Thinkpads I have one working battery, and
five dead ones. I try to save the remaining survivor for
very special occasions and will not let it be ruined by
the heat from the computer when there is no gain.

I do understand that in some setups a docking station
can be handy, if you have a lot of parephernalia and
not a network. But you should not get one just to
avoid ripping out the power cord. There must be
some other way to avoid that, depending on the
environment where it is used.

Nice laptops are often beautiful while an empty
docking station is very ugly.


Lars
Stockholm
http://web.telia.com/~u84406120/
May 1, 2005 8:31:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>Yes, the consensus of experience is that continuous running on AC will
>damage the batteries, and will essentially destroy them over 9 to 24
>months. Not always, and it's not "supposed" to happen, but there have
>been threads on this exact subject thousands of posts long, and the
>consensus is that it happens more often than not. It's not clear if the
>culprit is overcharging or heat, but it's not good for the batteries.

Thanks... just the info I need

>The usual recommendation is just to remove the batteries (the laptop
>will run fine that way). If you want the UPS protection function that
>the batteries provide, you can plug the laptop AC supply into an APC
>350VA ups that you can buy for $10 to $30 (on sale and usually after a
>rebate). Even $30 is a lot less than a lithium laptop battery, which
>can sell for over $200.

Good idea

But are today's modern laptops designed such that the
battery can be removed with affecting the structural
integrity of the unit? Bottom line.... is the battery
pack kind of part of the "body"?

I'm really dumb abt laptops.... please bear with the
questions

I really don't NEED a laptop as far as the mobility
part is concerned. I would probably only move the
laptop say once a month or on occasional trip. most of
the time it will be setting on my desk. hence the dumb
questions on my part
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 1, 2005 8:31:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

me@privacy.net writes:
> But are today's modern laptops designed such that the battery can be
> removed with affecting the structural integrity of the unit? Bottom
> line.... is the battery pack kind of part of the "body"?

It won't affect the structural integrity but yeah, the battery is part
of the laptop's overall shape and using the laptop with the battery
removed really does feel a bit odd, especially if you use it on your
lap rather than on your desk. I leave the battery in mine, as
mentioned. As others have said, that's apparently not good for the
battery, but I do it anyway. More recent laptops may have gotten
better about this.

> I really don't NEED a laptop as far as the mobility part is
> concerned. I would probably only move the laptop say once a month
> or on occasional trip. most of the time it will be setting on my
> desk. hence the dumb questions on my part

It's perfectly valid to use a laptop that way. Lots of people do.
A desktop system is a huge imposition on your living or work space.
Laptops are much more civilized.
May 1, 2005 9:10:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>It's perfectly valid to use a laptop that way. Lots of people do.
>A desktop system is a huge imposition on your living or work space.
>Laptops are much more civilized.

Thanks for your help Paul!

and thanks to the others as well!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 1, 2005 11:08:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:
> The battery pack is not usually a structural part of the laptop. Of
> course I am presuming that you replace the battery cover. There may
be
> a few laptops where there is no separate battery cover (one side of
the
> battery is "the cover"), but when I've seen that, I have not found
the
> battery to be structurally significant. Some batteries (such as the
> 2487 battery used in the Toshiba 2805 series laptops) are installed
into
> a "carrier", but the carrier is a separate part and the battery can
be
> removed from the carrier. The bottom line is that I've never seen a
> case where there was a structural concern about using the laptop
without
> a battery. Of course I have not seen every laptop, but I do service
> them, and I've encountered many models.
>
>

In my old notebook, that was true. The battery resided inside the
computer with a cover over it.

My current computer, a Dell Latitude, the battery is external. I
suppose you can run it without the battery there, but then there is a
dent in the bottom of the computer. That's the regular battery. It also
has an extended life battery that is larger and more like a docking
station. The computer plugs into *it*.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 2, 2005 5:55:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

The battery pack is not usually a structural part of the laptop. Of
course I am presuming that you replace the battery cover. There may be
a few laptops where there is no separate battery cover (one side of the
battery is "the cover"), but when I've seen that, I have not found the
battery to be structurally significant. Some batteries (such as the
2487 battery used in the Toshiba 2805 series laptops) are installed into
a "carrier", but the carrier is a separate part and the battery can be
removed from the carrier. The bottom line is that I've never seen a
case where there was a structural concern about using the laptop without
a battery. Of course I have not seen every laptop, but I do service
them, and I've encountered many models.



me@privacy.net wrote:

>>Yes, the consensus of experience is that continuous running on AC will
>>damage the batteries, and will essentially destroy them over 9 to 24
>>months. Not always, and it's not "supposed" to happen, but there have
>>been threads on this exact subject thousands of posts long, and the
>>consensus is that it happens more often than not. It's not clear if the
>>culprit is overcharging or heat, but it's not good for the batteries.
>
>
> Thanks... just the info I need
>
>
>>The usual recommendation is just to remove the batteries (the laptop
>>will run fine that way). If you want the UPS protection function that
>>the batteries provide, you can plug the laptop AC supply into an APC
>>350VA ups that you can buy for $10 to $30 (on sale and usually after a
>>rebate). Even $30 is a lot less than a lithium laptop battery, which
>>can sell for over $200.
>
>
> Good idea
>
> But are today's modern laptops designed such that the
> battery can be removed with affecting the structural
> integrity of the unit? Bottom line.... is the battery
> pack kind of part of the "body"?
>
> I'm really dumb abt laptops.... please bear with the
> questions
>
> I really don't NEED a laptop as far as the mobility
> part is concerned. I would probably only move the
> laptop say once a month or on occasional trip. most of
> the time it will be setting on my desk. hence the dumb
> questions on my part
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 2, 2005 8:31:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

yes it ok to run it on ac power all the time shops run theirs 24hours
a day ive been using mine for years on ac and have never bought a
battery for it i got mine as a replacment for my bulky desktop and it
uses a lot less power to ive never had a problem with mine
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 2, 2005 8:31:21 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

jorg20057000 wrote:
>
> yes it ok to run it on ac power all the time shops run theirs 24hours
> a day ive been using mine for years on ac and have never bought a
> battery for it i got mine as a replacment for my bulky desktop and it
> uses a lot less power to ive never had a problem with mine

One word, jorg... "Decaffeinated." <g>

Notan
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 2, 2005 8:31:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Notan wrote:
> jorg20057000 wrote:
>
>>yes it ok to run it on ac power all the time shops run theirs 24hours
>>a day ive been using mine for years on ac and have never bought a
>>battery for it i got mine as a replacment for my bulky desktop and it
>>uses a lot less power to ive never had a problem with mine
>
>
> One word, jorg... "Decaffeinated." <g>
>
> Notan

I know, right? More like "It's okay to breathe."
!