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Power Supply requirements

I had to buy a Power Supply since recently purchased HP workstation didn't have PCI-E power molex. The new one couldn't power the motherboard so naturally I thought I bought a defective PS and returned it to get a better one. This one also doesn't work.

I'm beginning to think the output of the power is the issue. I'm no expert on electric / power. I'm hoping someone here knows what problem I'm experiencing.
20 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about power supply requirements
  1. What is the exact model number of your HP workstation?
  2. HP Z200 workstation.
    The one advertised on HP's website has updated components and no longer sell my version of Z200
  3. Best answer
    When I look at the pinout of the 20-pin main power connector for the original HP Z200 power supply unit it doesn't conform to ATX standards. It looks to be proprietary because the HP power connector does not supply any +3.3VDC.

    It doesn't look like you can just buy any ATX form factor power supply unit and expect it to work because it won't.

    HP Z200 PSU Main power cable, P1

    Pin : Signal
    1 : GND
    2 : GND
    3 : –12V
    4 : GND
    5 : GND
    6 : PS_ON
    7 : GND
    8 : Fan_CMD
    9 : Fan_Tach
    10 : GND
    11 : 12VMain
    12 : 12VMain
    13 : GND
    14 : 12V1
    15 : 12V1
    16 : GND
    17 : 12VSB
    18 : 5V
    19 : GND
    20 : 5V

    Compare it to the ATX standard:
  4. ko888,
    you are the man. I know the info you provided me with doesn't help my situation but I got a clear answer to the problem that was making me scratch my head.
  5. struct said:
    ko888,
    you are the man. I know the info you provided me with doesn't help my situation but I got a clear answer to the problem that was making me scratch my head.

    I've read this response in the HP forums when someone else also asked if the Z200's power supply unit could be upgraded:

    "The official response from HP was no other power supply on the market will fit and even if one was found it would void warranty."
  6. Best answer selected by struct.
  7. I had a problem with my Z200 when trying to install another PSU, HP does use a propiotery motherboard connector preventing the use of any other power supply with the system, however I did however manage to make a small adapter which allows any standard ATX power supply to be used with the propitory motherboard connector, it swaps the pinouts and contains a small DC-DC convcerter board to raise the standby voltage. I would be happy to make it for a small fee if anyone is interested, contact me at GeorgeBurgess24@Gmail.com
  8. ko888 said:
    When I look at the pinout of the 20-pin main power connector for the original HP Z200 power supply unit . . .

    Pin : Signal / 1 : GND / 2 : GND / 3 : –12V / 4 : GND
    5 : GND / 6 : PS_ON / 7 : GND / 8 : Fan_CMD
    9 : Fan_Tach / 10 : GND / 11 : 12VMain / 12 : 12VMain
    13 : GND / 14 : 12V1 / 15 : 12V1 / 16 : GND
    17 : 12VSB / 18 : 5V / 19 : GND / 20 : 5V


    I hope I will be forgiven for going off-topic here, but may I ask...

    From where does one obtain this pinout data?

    - Did you simply observe the color of the wire-insulation present on an actual copy of the PSU (or from good-quality photos of the PSU)?

    - Or did you copy & paste this pinout data from an HP website or an HP pdf-file?

    I am looking for the same type of pinout data for the HP Compaq DC7900 CMT [Convertible Mini-Tower], and am not sure whether I can just determine (with absolute certainty) the pinout data by direct observation of the wire-insulation colors, or whether I really need to find the pinout data from an HP Data Sheet somewhere .

    EDIT: . I just found the answer to my own question, and have posted it at:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2000888/dc7900-psu-upgrade.html
  9. Upgrader3 said:
    I hope I will be forgiven for going off-topic here, but may I ask...

    From where does one obtain this pinout data?

    - Did you simply observe the color of the wire-insulation present on an actual copy of the PSU (or from good-quality photos of the PSU)?

    - Or did you copy & paste this pinout data from an HP website or an HP pdf-file?

    I am looking for the same type of pinout data for the HP Compaq DC7900 CMT [Convertible Mini-Tower], and am not sure whether I can just determine (with absolute certainty) the pinout data by direct observation of the wire-insulation colors, or whether I really need to find the pinout data from an HP Data Sheet somewhere .

    EDIT: . I just found the answer to my own question, and have posted it at:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2000888/dc7900-psu-upgrade.html


    Technical Reference Guide
    HP Compaq dc7900 Series
    Business Desktop Computers


    Page 7-5

    http://h20566.www2.hp.com/portal/site/hpsc/template.BINARYPORTLET/public/kb/docDisplay/resource.process/?spf_p.tpst=kbDocDisplay_ws_BI&spf_p.rid_kbDocDisplay=docDisplayResURL&javax.portlet.begCacheTok=com.vignette.cachetoken&spf_p.rst_kbDocDisplay=wsrp-resourceState%3DdocId%253Demr_na-c01549447-56%257CdocLocale%253Den_US&javax.portlet.endCacheTok=com.vignette.cachetoken
  10. As ko888 shows, the standard ATX PSU connector is incompatible with the HP z200 PSU-to-mobo pinout.

    Along the lines of the February 20, 2013 post in this thread [by Anonymous, aka GeorgeBurgess24@Gmail.com] . . .

    If you want to pursue DIY work-arounds (that will allow you to go ahead and connect a standard ATX PSU to a motherboard with a proprietary pinout), here are two links with potentially relevant "how to" information:

    http://www.fixya.com/support/t3207823-dc7100_compact_power_supply
    > See solution by joecoolvette

    http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-1833076/odd-motherboard-power-connector.html
    > See "Best Solution" and subsequent posts in this thread
  11. My answer is specifically in response to your statement:

    Quote:
    I am looking for the same type of pinout data for the HP Compaq DC7900 CMT [Convertible Mini-Tower], and am not sure whether I can just determine (with absolute certainty) the pinout data by direct observation of the wire-insulation colors, or whether I really need to find the pinout data from an HP Data Sheet somewhere .
  12. ko888 said:


    Thank you for taking the time to post the source link for the HP dc7900.

    It's interesting that HP uses the standard pinout for the dc7900 (and likely the 7600 / 7700 / 7800 also), but a proprietary pinout for the z200 (and probably the 210 / 220 / 230 also).
  13. Hi all
    Forgive-me to disinter this subject.

    I have the same problem with HP Z230 Workstation Tower.
    I just bought a new gfx card (GTX 970) requiring more power that the HP power unit can deliver. A 6-pins cable for the gfx card is also missing (only 1 available, 2 needed).

    So, I bought a new ATX power, imagining it would be easy to build my own adaptor from the 24-pins to the 20-pins motherboard connector.
    Unfortunately, I did not notice the motherboard P1 connector is a new one, using 18-pins, and after long days of research, I still do not have any information about the schematics of HP Z230 PSU Main power cable.

    Does anyone can help me ?
    Maybe you encountered the same problem ?
  14. debilus said:
    Hi all
    Forgive-me to disinter this subject.

    I have the same problem with HP Z230 Workstation Tower.
    I just bought a new gfx card (GTX 970) requiring more power that the HP power unit can deliver. A 6-pins cable for the gfx card is also missing (only 1 available, 2 needed).

    So, I bought a new ATX power, imagining it would be easy to build my own adaptor from the 24-pins to the 20-pins motherboard connector.
    Unfortunately, I did not notice the motherboard P1 connector is a new one, using 18-pins, and after long days of research, I still do not have any information about the schematics of HP Z230 PSU Main power cable.

    Does anyone can help me ?
    Maybe you encountered the same problem ?


    Since the original PSU only outputs +12V, -12V and +12VSB (i.e. no +3.3V, +5V and +5VSB rails) what are you using to convert the ATX12V PSU's +5VSB into +12VSB needed by the motherboard?
  15. debilus said:
    Hi all
    Forgive-me to disinter this subject.

    I have the same problem with HP Z230 Workstation Tower.
    I just bought a new gfx card (GTX 970) requiring more power that the HP power unit can deliver. A 6-pins cable for the gfx card is also missing (only 1 available, 2 needed).

    So, I bought a new ATX power, imagining it would be easy to build my own adaptor from the 24-pins to the 20-pins motherboard connector.
    Unfortunately, I did not notice the motherboard P1 connector is a new one, using 18-pins, and after long days of research, I still do not have any information about the schematics of HP Z230 PSU Main power cable.

    Does anyone can help me ?
    Maybe you encountered the same problem ?


    Here are some of your choices:

    1) . Wait for someone who has solved this problem to post their solution on Tom's Hardware or similar website -- if you take this approach you will have to wait for an unknown number of weeks or months (or longer, as in years?) because the z230 was engineered by HP to prevent the kind of thing you are trying to do (and HP is gradually getting better at this sort of "barrier engineering").

    Here is the way one reviewer puts it:

    "The only real downside to the Z230 is its limited expansion capabilities. That’s the tradeoff for the lower price and smaller size. If you think you might need dual multicore processors, a more powerful graphics card than a Quadro K4000, more memory than 32GB, or more than 9TB of onboard storage, then be prepared to pay more for a larger, more expandable workstation."
    http://

    2) . You can hire a local computer hardware-hacker or harware-service-tech to guide you through the process of building an adapter, but that may run $50/hr-or-more for an unknown number of consulting hours. And you will still void the warranty, if that matters to you [it wouldn't to me, because I would get too much satisfaction out of breaching HP's "engineering barrier"; but it might matter to you]

    [ Creating a custom adapter may not actually be all that difficult if you are:
    a) . somewhat knowledgeable in basic electronics
    b) . detail-orented (mistakes can be irreversible / costly)
    c) . have the free time, and
    d) . are truly determined to beat HP at its game

    e.g., see this thread involving Acer / Gateway towers...
    http:// ]

    3) . You might try a dual power supply approach, running the mobo off the stock PSU, and the GPU off an externally located supplementary PSU. Same warranty issue. Don't know if this approach is actually workable or not. Someone here on Tom's Hardware may be able to advise on this.

    4) . You can downgrade to a lower-power GPU.

    5) . You can upgrade to a computer better designed for what you are attempting to do.

    All of the above points to the old adage: Look before you leap. Good luck with the path that you choose.
  16. Thanks all for your answers.
    I have underestimate HP engineers, this issue is not so easy to solve.
    I have decided, short term to use a second power supply unit only for the gfx card.
    At mid term, I'll will try to change the mother board. What do you think about that ? The all parts are standard (cpu, memory, hdd, ssd....), so changing mobo should make this computer 'normal' including PSU isn't it ?

    BR
  17. debilus said:
    Thanks all for your answers.
    I have underestimate HP engineers, this issue is not so easy to solve.
    I have decided, short term to use a second power supply unit only for the gfx card.
    At mid term, I'll will try to change the mother board. What do you think about that ? The all parts are standard (cpu, memory, hdd, ssd....), so changing mobo should make this computer 'normal' including PSU isn't it ?

    BR



    I think it would be a good idea for you to post your question as a completely new post or new thread.

    But I'll add this comment here and now:

    Swapping in a new motherboard might be a workable solution, assuming that:

    1) . You choose a new motherboard or system board that is of the ATX form factor:

    http://
    Page 14: . System Board Form Factor: ATX 27.69 x 24.38 mm (10.9 x 9.6 inches)

    2) . All the connection points to the new motherboard use the same type of connectors as all of the connection points to the original HP motherboard.

    3) . There is plenty of space in the case to comfortably handle your GPU upgrade.

    Swapping a motherboard is a considerable the amount of time and effort -- therefore at this juncture you may wish to consider swapping both the case and the motherboard.

    A larger aluminum case with excellent cooling and ventilation features would help handle the cooling needs of a hard-working graphics card, and additional working room would make installing & removing compoents easier..

    I am sure that many here on Tom's Hardware could make some excellent case suggestions. Good brands include (and are not limited to) Antec, Caselabs, Corsair, Coolermaster, Lian Li, Mountainmods, Silverstone, and Thermaltake.

    Good luck with your upgrade path!
  18. ko888 said:
    When I look at the pinout of the 20-pin main power connector for the original HP Z200 power supply unit it doesn't conform to ATX standards. It looks to be proprietary because the HP power connector does not supply any +3.3VDC.

    It doesn't look like you can just buy any ATX form factor power supply unit and expect it to work because it won't.

    HP Z200 PSU Main power cable, P1

    Pin : Signal
    1 : GND
    2 : GND
    3 : –12V
    4 : GND
    5 : GND
    6 : PS_ON
    7 : GND
    8 : Fan_CMD
    9 : Fan_Tach
    10 : GND
    11 : 12VMain
    12 : 12VMain
    13 : GND
    14 : 12V1
    15 : 12V1
    16 : GND
    17 : 12VSB
    18 : 5V
    19 : GND
    20 : 5V

    Compare it to the ATX standard:


    Great post, I'm hoping to swap these pins around but when comparing the graphics it looks like the pin-out numbering is different between the compared graphics. Are both of the graphics supposed to be looking at the connectors femaile end, or the backside where the cables run out from?
  19. What I mean to say is that the #1 pin is on the bottom left in the ATX diagram, and in the bottom right in the HP z200 diagram. Any reason why the pins are numbered differently?
  20. LoXodonte said:
    Great post, I'm hoping to swap these pins around but when comparing the graphics it looks like the pin-out numbering is different between the compared graphics. Are both of the graphics supposed to be looking at the connectors femaile end, or the backside where the cables run out from?


    The images are for the connectors from the power supply unit, not the socket on the motherboard.

    The numbering is meaningless. All that matters is that the correct voltage shows up on the correct pin position in the connector.
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