What we were talking about 11 years ago! Amazing

Just found this ancient thread about what kind of system you would buy with $10,000. It is amazing to see what has changed since 2000. This made me laugh a lot, i knew people on tomshardware would appreciate this :D

http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=375199
81 answers Last reply
More about what talking years amazing
  1. Nice. Though that second guy was throwing in a full home theater for his 10k :lol:
  2. I know :lol: and i love how he says "But put a REALLY huge HD array in there, something along the lines of 200GB". It's like science fiction to even mention 200GB of storage :lol: This blows my mind
  3. Well, you could still see that sentence today, however it would say a '200GB SSD'. Hopefully in a few years we'll be laughing at 200GB SSDs too!
  4. the sad thing is, that doesnt seem like all that long ago or me. if you were to pull up a thread on 386/486 hardware, that is about where i started with pc's.
  5. EXT64 said:
    Well, you could still see that sentence today, however it would say a '200GB SSD'. Hopefully in a few years we'll be laughing at 200GB SSDs too!



    Too right, right now my wallet starts crying at the mention of SSD's
  6. Athlon 64, socket 754/939, that's when I began building.
  7. I started with the Socket A. I'm not too old. ;)
  8. 200gb for the time was a lot for a home or office user but the ram what a joke. I got more ram sitting in a socket 7 rig than that. As for the rest rolf. XD
  9. loneninja said:
    Athlon 64, socket 754/939, that's when I began building.


    I started out with socket 7 then moved up to slot 1. Then 370 but finally 775 and am2+. Amassed a neat little collection of cpus during those phases.
  10. nforce4max said:
    I started out with socket 7 then moved up to slot 1. Then 370 but finally 775 and am2+. Amassed a neat little collection of cpus during those phases.

    The socket 7 K6III 450 was a proper CPU, OC and melted via DIP switches! :lol: Them's were the days.
  11. loneninja said:
    Athlon 64, socket 754/939, that's when I began building.

    ya buddy i also started with athlon xp and fx5200
  12. 8086 in the hizzay! Used to have to use chip pullers to remove RAM (almost always a risk of removing the socket and cracking a motherboard). Did you know hard drives once plugged into ISA expansion slots (similar to Revo drives in the PCIe of today). Anyone else have a PC running in PC DOS 1.0 using different boot disks so different programs would work? 5 1/4" disks anyone? Zork?

    Anyone learn to program on a Timex Sinclair 1000 (expansion memory module used to always pop out the back while you were typing and you'd lose all your code) or Commodore 64 (programs saved to cassette tape?)? Let me tell you, the cassette tape is one speedy form of media!
  13. ubercake said:
    8086 in the hizzay! Used to have to use chip pullers to remove RAM (almost always a risk of removing the socket and cracking a motherboard). Did you know hard drives once plugged into ISA expansion slots (similar to Revo drives in the PCIe of today). Anyone else have a PC running in PC DOS 1.0 using different boot disks so different programs would work? 5 1/4" disks anyone? Zork?

    Anyone learn to program on a Timex Sinclair 1000 (expansion memory module used to always pop out the back while you were typing and you'd lose all your code) or Commodore 64 (programs saved to cassette tape?)? Let me tell you, the cassette tape is one speedy form of media!


    Actually still have a working Panasonic Sr. Partner 8088 with 512MB RAM and 2 5.25" floppy drives that still functions using MS dos 1.0 and Lotus 123 ver 1a. and working copies of Zork I, II, and III ! and cassette tapes are still faster than making the punch cards I learned on !

    If you'd like to go back and relive them they still offer free downloads of the Zork series HERE

  14. ubercake said:
    8086 in the hizzay! Used to have to use chip pullers to remove RAM (almost always a risk of removing the socket and cracking a motherboard). Did you know hard drives once plugged into ISA expansion slots (similar to Revo drives in the PCIe of today). Anyone else have a PC running in PC DOS 1.0 using different boot disks so different programs would work? 5 1/4" disks anyone? Zork?

    Anyone learn to program on a Timex Sinclair 1000 (expansion memory module used to always pop out the back while you were typing and you'd lose all your code) or Commodore 64 (programs saved to cassette tape?)? Let me tell you, the cassette tape is one speedy form of media!


    Try older, the oldest thing I have seen was from the 70s and had 8 inch floppies. The largest hard drive by physical bulk was the IBM Ramac 305 with its massive 26in platters. :whistle:
  15. Mousemonkey said:
    The socket 7 K6III 450 was a proper CPU, OC and melted via DIP switches! :lol: Them's were the days.


    Who needs DIP switches when there is simple finger cutting jumper blocks. :sol:
  16. ubercake said:
    8086 in the hizzay! Used to have to use chip pullers to remove RAM (almost always a risk of removing the socket and cracking a motherboard). Did you know hard drives once plugged into ISA expansion slots (similar to Revo drives in the PCIe of today). Anyone else have a PC running in PC DOS 1.0 using different boot disks so different programs would work? 5 1/4" disks anyone? Zork?

    Anyone learn to program on a Timex Sinclair 1000 (expansion memory module used to always pop out the back while you were typing and you'd lose all your code) or Commodore 64 (programs saved to cassette tape?)? Let me tell you, the cassette tape is one speedy form of media!


    My first computer was also a 8086. It ran at 12mhz with a turbo button to run at 16mhz (or it might have been 8 and 12, it's been a long time). It has 640KB of ram and 20MB hard drive. The salesman told my dad he would never be able to use all that 20MB's of hd space. I also used MS and PC DOS. I found PC DOS was faster and more stable, despite it being less popular to MS. The last DOS version I remember was 5.1 (I might have used it up to 7). I never did like Windows 3.0 or 3.1. I jumped onto Windows with 95.

    We got that computer originally to run Peach Tree for the family business. Of course I like to play with it too. To run a report could take up to 4 hours. Talk about state of the art technology :P
  17. bystander said:
    My first computer was also a 8086. It ran at 12mhz with a turbo button to run at 16mhz (or it might have been 8 and 12, it's been a long time). It has 640KB of ram and 20MB hard drive. The salesman told my dad he would never be able to use all that 20MB's of hd space. I also used MS and PC DOS. I found PC DOS was faster and more stable, despite it being less popular to MS. The last DOS version I remember was 5.1 (I might have used it up to 7). I never did like Windows 3.0 or 3.1. I jumped onto Windows with 95.

    We got that computer originally to run Peach Tree for the family business. Of course I like to play with it too. To run a report could take up to 4 hours. Talk about state of the art technology :P


    I never had a model with the turbo button. I was always envious of the kids that did.

    First good games on there were some Boxing Champs game, NFL Challenge (x's and o's), Larry Bird vs Dr J one-on-one (the original EA sports title), and much later King's Quest; All in your choice of red, yellow, green and black or cyan, magenta, white, and black. Oh... and the main reason my dad bought it was for the Autocad. Good stuff.
  18. JDFan said:
    Actually still have a working Panasonic Sr. Partner 8088 with 512MB RAM and 2 5.25" floppy drives that still functions using MS dos 1.0 and Lotus 123 ver 1a. and working copies of Zork I, II, and III ! and cassette tapes are still faster than making the punch cards I learned on !

    If you'd like to go back and relive them they still offer free downloads of the Zork series HERE

    http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc189/JDFanning_bucket/zork1.jpg

    Nice!
  19. ubercake said:
    8086 in the hizzay! Used to have to use chip pullers to remove RAM (almost always a risk of removing the socket and cracking a motherboard). Did you know hard drives once plugged into ISA expansion slots (similar to Revo drives in the PCIe of today). Anyone else have a PC running in PC DOS 1.0 using different boot disks so different programs would work? 5 1/4" disks anyone? Zork?

    Anyone learn to program on a Timex Sinclair 1000 (expansion memory module used to always pop out the back while you were typing and you'd lose all your code) or Commodore 64 (programs saved to cassette tape?)? Let me tell you, the cassette tape is one speedy form of media!


    I got a sinclair 1000 with a mervellous 64Kilobyte expension pack for around 100$ ....God ....cheez I do a packman on that on my old black & tv hahahahah.... I program a lot on that machine, thing to calculate electricity bill phone bill, credit card interest ... It's seems a long long time ago hahaha...
    I also have a texas intrument with a tape... The gam start a 699.... Oups I forgot to reset the meter at 0 .... where is that dam game now hahaha...

    Thanks
  20. jive said:
    I got a sinclair 1000 with a mervellous 64Kilobyte expension pack for around 100$ ....God ....cheez I do a packman on that on my old black & tv hahahahah.... I program a lot on that machine, thing to calculate electricity bill phone bill, credit card interest ... It's seems a long long time ago hahaha...
    I also have a texas intrument with a tape... The gam start a 699.... Oups I forgot to reset the meter at 0 .... where is that dam game now hahaha...

    Thanks

    Funny. I think mine started with 2K and I expanded it to 16K. I just remember that expansion module popping out on me all the time. The way it connected to the back was terrible. I learned a lot, but it was very frustrating.
  21. Didn't mean to hijack the thread by going back a little more than 11 years. Sorry about that!
  22. ubercake said:
    Didn't mean to hijack the thread by going back a little more than 11 years. Sorry about that!


    No please keep on going. It is often the old stuff that teaches the most that there is to learn. ;)
  23. Yes keep going this is why i posted the link here; this is some interesting stuff for a 20 year old. My computer history starts with windows 98 haha! It is definitely necessary to understand where it all started from.
  24. Win 95 machines and Mac LC2 era :s even for my age I am ancient.
  25. nforce4max said:
    Win 95 machines and Mac LC2 era :s even for my age I am ancient.

    Oh great, I'm more than twice your age so what does that make me then? :(
  26. Started with Windows 98 2nd Edition, Pentium 1, with 133 MHZ, with a turbo button (which I've never used it !), and 32MB, and 1MB graphic card lol...

    Used to play alot: Doom, Duke Nukem 3D, Shadow Warrior ...

    Game nowadays are easy, god, I remember configuring the sound in setup via MS DOS for those games (sound blaster) to make 'em work, all those IRQ and DMA, it was hell ...
  27. zoro_2009 said:
    Started with Windows 98 2nd Edition, Pentium 1, with 133 MHZ, with a turbo button (which I've never used it !), and 32MB, and 1MB graphic card lol...

    Used to play alot: Doom, Duke Nukem 3D, Shadow Warrior ...

    Game nowadays are easy, god, I remember configuring the sound in setup via MS DOS for those games (sound blaster) to make 'em work, all those IRQ and DMA, it was hell ...

    A boot disk for every game. Config.sys this, Autoexec.bat that...
  28. Mousemonkey said:
    Oh great, I'm more than twice your age so what does that make me then? :(


    Well I started out on stuff that was for me already very old for my agre group. While most kiddies were rocking p2 and p3 machines on up to P4 or Athlon xp I was stuck with p1 boxes. I learned a lot though in those years. I still remember my first windows 95 experience in the third grade at school. :whistle: but my first mac experience was in the first grade :lol: Years later I would get those machines off the school and they became my first rigs. I was just a poor country kid. Worked my way up since. It wasn't until just a few years ago ware I started to catch up to every one else. I still envy those rich kids with their $3k usd machines that they seam to have a new one every 6-8 months with all the latest gear.
  29. My first pc but wasn't the oldest that I have owned. 100mhz p1, 16mb ram (yes you read right) 1gb quantum hard drive, and 1mb cirrus logic gpu. First mac at the same time maxed out at 10mb ram, 200mb scsi drive (lol) and was a 68k based machine. Really old stuff but the oldest thing that I have owned was a few books from the early 80s and a very large memory expansion card for the 8080 era machines with driver disk and manual.
  30. Apple II back in high school. My friend had a Commodore 64 with a tape drive. The first computer I used in a work environment was an IBM 8086 with dual 5 1/4" floppy drives and a 5 Meg hard drive. Thought I was hot stuff when I filled that bugger and needed an second 5 Meg drive installed.

    First computer I bought, though, was the Amiga 500 I used to play Lemmings and an F-18 Flight Simulator to no end! That was my first real foray into computer gaming. A couple years later, I bought an AST 486DX2-50. I think it came with 512K of RAM, a 4 Gig hard drive and Windows 3.1. The big game, at the time, was Doom II.

    The first upgrade I performed was putting in 4 Meg of RAM and installing Windows 95 onto that AST system. Later, Cyrix came out with a DX4-100 CPU upgrade.

    The first system I built was based on an Intel PIII-800 processor and 256 Meg of RAM. I pulled the hard drive from my old AST system, reformatted it and installed Windows NT 4.0. Added an S3-Virge graphics card (my first) and a second hard drive (6GB). That system tided me over for almost seven years, until it finally died in 2004.

    Since then, I've bought one more desktop and two laptops. I've built and upgraded half a dozen systems since then; ranging from an AMD 3500+ to my latest Core I5 system (this system).

    -Wolf sends
  31. I remember the joys of editing drivers out of config.sys and autoexec.bat in order to try and free up enough of the 640kb of conventional ram to run certain games. Falcon 3.0 was a real bitch about it.

    486 sx 25 FTW!
  32. benski said:

    486 sx 25 FTW!


    Did you add the math coprocessor to that ?
  33. JDFan said:
    Did you add the math coprocessor to that ?


    No, the 486 isn't like the 386 ware you can just dump one it. The 486 had one intergrated on the die however not all were functional thus Intel continued the SX line from the 386 with the math co processor aka the FPU disabled. When users purchased a 487 it was nothing more than a 486 DX with the fpu active that took over while the SX sat idle. It was a joke then and was often made the machine a even more expensive space heater. The 25mhz SX sucked period and hated it when I had one for experimentation before the board failed. The DX was a very pricey for its time and was why Cyrix was a popular value choice along with AMD. For SX users getting an AMD was often the way to go. Then the Pentium rolled in at a sluggish 60 and 66mhz. It was comparable to a 100mhz DX4 and a lot more expensive and fragile. It is the second largest ceramic cpu produced to date second only to the Pentium pro. Used socket 4 platform and the early boards didn't even have pci. Old VLB and 16bit ISA :lol: It was post 1995/6 ware it all took off though. :wahoo:

    Now the 386 era had some strange things compared to now days like the Cyrix fastmath co processor (cheaper and some time better than what Intel had) and 30pin sims. :whistle:

    Now you understand what I had said earlier Mouse.
  34. nforce4max said:
    Snip


    Actually they did sell a math co processor for the 486 SX (at least it was marketed as one !) :

    Quote:
    The 80486SX uses a "math coprocessor" called the 80487SX (there is no 80487DX at all so don't be confused by that). The 80487SX is, in fact, a fully functional 80486DX chip! What Intel wanted people to think was that (like with its earlier coprocessors) you would put the 80487SX in and it would handle the math functions. In fact, when inserted, the 80487SX shuts down the 80486SX and handles both integer and floating point operations (since it is internally a 80486DX, which does both). This makes no difference from a performance standpoint but is kind of a technical curiosity.
  35. As I had said and didn't need a wiki for that :) plus it still required a second socket to be able to use it. The rarest thing that I had seen in a 486 era machine was a Compaq workstation that allowed the l2 cache to be installed as a card rather than separate chips as some boards that I have seen.

    Ipod circa 1960 aka DEC PDP 1 playing music.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RvwJ79BAwg
  36. My first PC, I didn't build it, but I sure as hell rebuilt it, quite a few times, though it maintained the same case forever.

    Intel 33MHz 486, which originally had 4MB of Ram, a 128 MB hard drive, a 4X CD rom, a 200 Watt PSU, a Soundblaster 16, and some 14.4 Baud Hayes compatible modem. Lastly, a 2MB Diamond Video card. Of course, you had to have an IDE/ATA card back then.

    Eventually I got a PCI diamond video card with 8MB, a 24X CD rom, a 36.6 USrobotics modem that I firmware upgraded to a 56K, a 2GB HDD from Maxtor, and eventually upgraed the motherboard to take on EDO memory and got her up to 16 MB and AMD's 133MHZ 486 (which outpowered the original Pentiums).

    The good old days of using jumpers to set your frequency, voltage, and mutipliers, no thermal paste and for some reason it wasn't uncommon for a Motherboard to set the wire for your internal speaker on fire.
  37. :L Had that happen once, for some strange reason I still have that board even though it took a nasty burn.
  38. JDFan said:
    Actually they did sell a math co processor for the 486 SX (at least it was marketed as one !) :

    Quote:
    The 80486SX uses a "math coprocessor" called the 80487SX (there is no 80487DX at all so don't be confused by that). The 80487SX is, in fact, a fully functional 80486DX chip! What Intel wanted people to think was that (like with its earlier coprocessors) you would put the 80487SX in and it would handle the math functions. In fact, when inserted, the 80487SX shuts down the 80486SX and handles both integer and floating point operations (since it is internally a 80486DX, which does both). This makes no difference from a performance standpoint but is kind of a technical curiosity.

    My board had a slot for one, but I never did buy one. My next summers lawn mowing profits went to a 66 mustang and I got distracted from computers for a few years.
  39. My alchoholic neighbor who had been fired from Tandy built that computer, it had one of the first 2.88 mb floppy drives which I still have. I think the rest of it is in my garage somewhere but years ago when I had the box open to take some parts out a cat pissed in it so it's probably trash now.
  40. A cat always pisses on it!
  41. Yea no kidding :|
  42. First computer -TRS-80 Color Computer 16k with chiclet keyboard and cassette drive-could peek and poke it to OC it
    Still have it- Should still work though a cat pissed on outside of box :)
    Darn cats.....
  43. Some of you may enjoy this short but slightly annoying video. It is about the history of the Cray era vector supercomputing machines.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPJt93bkIz0
  44. I'm "younger"(28), so my first comp was a 33mhz 486dx with a huge 16MB of edo-dram and some video card with 2MB of vdram. This comp cost $3.2k

    Yes, it included a turbo button :P

    My first computer. I was ~11.
  45. How'd you get 3.2 grand at 11??
  46. Rich parents or family.
  47. That or it wasn't exactly "his", but a family computer. I looked at it the same way with "my" first computer, the 8086. It was really a family computer. I just used it the most :P
  48. The first computer I recall in my family was an Apple IIe. It was white with a tiny green screen. I played some fun games on there like Snake, Qbert, Bouncy Ball...

    Then we got a 386. I'm not sure if I played on it much. Then we had a 686 and I remember using that one to game. I think at one point we got a 4MB video card for it, around the time of Quake and Duke Nukem 3D. I think the 386 we used a lot of DOS. Probably had Windows 4.0 or w/e it was, or maybe that was the 686. Or both? Oh and I remember I got this space game, Mantis, for Christmas one year. It had like 8 install floppys. Haha.

    I'm pretty sure the next PC after that was from Futureshop - Cicero brand. I don't really know what was in it, as I was still not really into the hardware stuff. This PC had Win 95. And it didn't have a 5.25" floppy drive, just the 3.5".

    But then I bought my own PC, for the first time, around... 4 years ago. 5 maybe? Anyway it was a Core 2 duo. 2.4ghz I think. With an 8600GT that I burned out playing Dirt, because I never cleaned it's heat sink. Running Win XP.
    Then after a while without a gaming PC I went and sold that one to my parents (who were still using the Cicero crap) and bought myself my current PC, which I absolutely love. And of course, Win 7 64bit.
  49. What is a 686? Was that some sort of Cyrix chip? The intel went to the Pentium after the 486.
Ask a new question

Read More

Radeon Graphics