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Computer willl no longer boot with new video card. (AGP)

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 15, 2011 3:13:39 AM

Hello,

Motherboard: Asus P4PE (no on board video)
PSU: 550W

I recently replaced my ATI Radeon 9800 Pro with a used Asus GeForce N6600. After I installed the new card, I started up my computer without any issue. I accessed my BIOS to remove my floppy disk detection to prevent having to hit 'F1' when my computer boots up.

While I was in the BIOS my monitor turned off, but my computer was still running. Unable to get my display back, I restarted my computer. This happened a couple of times during my process of removing my old drivers and installing the new drivers. I loaded Windows XP, with my fingers crossed, and was able to complete the work needed for the drivers. I restarted and everything seemed fine. I loaded up Counter-Strike 1.6 and the game seemed to run fine (better than the ATI Card). No more than 7 minutes later my monitor shut off, and I heard my speakers making a repetitive noise. I shut down the computer.

When I restarted the machine, I could not get it to boot up. There was no 'all clear' beep and both the power and HDD leds were on. I unplugged the power to the video card, and while I heard the video card beep because it had no sound, I heard my computer sound the 'all clear' beep and I knew my computer was turning on fine. I uninstalled the new GeForce card and switched back to my ATI. The ATI boots up fine, never shuts off the monitor, and I have no troubles with it related to the troubles I am having with the GeForce.

I am assuming the Asus GeForce N6600 that I have is the problem and not my system. What can I do to try and get this card working? What do you think is wrong? I don't have access to another machine to test the card; however, I may be able to test it on a friend's box later this week if I have too.
a b U Graphics card
February 15, 2011 3:52:51 AM

Did you uninstall the ATI drivers before installing the new card and drivers? Here is a link to a tool to completely remove the drivers (http://www.phyxion.net/Driver-Sweeper/Driver-Sweeper/). The repetitive sound is often indicative of a driver conflict. If after you clean the ATI drivers, install the latest NV drivers, the card still does not work, it may be defective. You say it is a used card so that is possible.
February 15, 2011 4:00:35 AM

When I installed the drivers for the N6600 before, I didn't uninstall the ATI drivers until after I get into Windows and I didn't run a Driver Cleaner, I will try your method.

Thanks for the positive news, I will give it a test tomorrow after classes. It is a used card, but the previous owner was very adamant about the card in good, working condition.
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a b U Graphics card
February 15, 2011 2:02:05 PM

Dogsnake said:
Did you uninstall the ATI drivers before installing the new card and drivers? Here is a link to a tool to completely remove the drivers (http://www.phyxion.net/Driver-Sweeper/Driver-Sweeper/). The repetitive sound is often indicative of a driver conflict. If after you clean the ATI drivers, install the latest NV drivers, the card still does not work, it may be defective. You say it is a used card so that is possible.





It's likely not a driver related issue. The OP states that the monitor turned off while the system was in BIOS. A driver wouldn't cause this. I'm going with defective card on this one.



a b U Graphics card
February 15, 2011 2:03:09 PM

arobson13 said:
It is a used card, but the previous owner was very adamant about the card in good, working condition.




You generally don't find previous owners that are adamant that the card they're trying to sell is defective / flaky.



February 15, 2011 3:40:52 PM

mavroxur said:
It's likely not a driver related issue. The OP states that the monitor turned off while the system was in BIOS. A driver wouldn't cause this. I'm going with defective card on this one.



That is what I am afraid of. None-the-less I will give it another shot, and if I still can't boot up, I will end up returning the card to the seller.
February 15, 2011 8:55:36 PM

Very interesting development.

Processor: Pentium 4 - 2.4Ghz

I followed DogSnake's suggestion and ran the Driver sweep. It cleared all the video drivers I had on my computer, and I restarted and ran it a second time, just to be sure. After that I installed the N6600 card and tried to boot the computer. It did not boot. I couldn't get it to POST.

I put the ATI card back into the computer and went into the BIOS. I made a slight change to my CPU Frequency Speed; I set it from 133 to 123. I underclocked my CPU. When I took out the ATI card and installed the GeForce, I was amazed that I was able to POST, and actually get into windows.

This is not the end of it, it's still not working. My monitor shut off again on me and I had to shut it down.

Why was it that, when I adjusted my CPU clock speed that the computer was able to POST and load windows? Does the fact that my monitor turns off in windows, and in the BIOS, a sign that the card has something fundamentally wrong with it that I will not be able to fix?
a b U Graphics card
February 15, 2011 10:49:16 PM

It sounds like a possible AGP version incompatibility.

There's three different versions of AGP (1.0, 2.0, 3.0). AGP had song a long shelf life, that generally cards that were AGP 3.0 did NOT support AGP 1.0 (and on rare occasions other versions). It simply wasn't needed as the gap between 1.0 and 3.0 hardware on the motherboard was so large, that putting a 3.0 card in a 1.0 motherboard would yeild little gains due to the other technology on the motherboard bottle-necking the card due to being outdated.

Look up the model of both your Motherboard and your Nvidia card and see if they share support for at least one version of AGP (e.g. if your motherboard supports 1.0 and 2.0, and your card ONLY supports 3.0, it'll like be incompatible, and thus your issue).

A pentium 4 compatible motherboard should be AGP 3.0 in most cases, but it may be 2.0 if it's an earlier model. The last AGP cards made, may only support 3.0, I'll explain why, below.

Keep in mind that AGP is considered a Legacy connection standard, so as it grows older, much less care is put into overall compatibility, and more toward general use. It's simply not cost effective to put too much work into a standard that makes up what is becoming an ever shrinking, minority of the market share.

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a b U Graphics card
February 15, 2011 10:51:33 PM
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P.S. I don't know the energy draw on the two specific cards, but it's possible the card is drawing too much power from the PSU. A failing PSU will behave like any number of weird hardware problems and is often hard to diagnose. I'd check the version compatibility issue first.
a b U Graphics card
February 15, 2011 11:37:24 PM

P.S.S. AGP standards are usually listed by speed

1X and 2X = 1.0
4X = 2.0
8X = 3.0
February 22, 2011 11:31:07 PM

I ended up having a new IT friend come over and install a different Nvidia card. We had some troubles at first but ended up getting the new GeForce 7600 GS installed and working properly. I am excited to say that I may have found the issue with the previous N6600 card. I will have to do some tests to confirm it, but perhaps it all comes down to trying to power the video card from the same molex cable as I did my two hard drives.

This wasn't an issue with my ATI 9800, but it seems to be running smoothly after I changed the tether with my new GeForce 7600. Maybe someone can explain that to me.

I will take a moment to test the N6600 to see if it is defective, but my friend (who never saw the card in action) said it might have been a power issue like the 7600.
March 2, 2011 2:36:49 AM

I am going to decide on the best answer for this issue, from what I have gathered the issue was not a direct issue with the card as much as a power issue. So I will regard the best answer as the closes answer to my problem.
March 2, 2011 2:37:40 AM

Best answer selected by arobson13.
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