Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Killed Mobo by benchmarking HDD?

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
April 2, 2012 2:24:58 PM

Hello,

This is not a help is my motherboard dead post. I know it is. This is a "how the *** did this kill my motherboard post?" I just don't understand how what killed it.

So I have a i72600k, Gigabyte ga-z68p-ud3, 8gb of g.skill ram, 4 sata drives, a GTX560TI and a 650watt Antec Earthwatts. That rig has been running for about 4 months.

Just the other day I picked up a Samsung 830 64gb SSD and set it up using intel Smart Response Tech (/Rapid Storage Tech). I did a fresh windows install and got the cache running. I spent the next 2 nights redoing my file organization, copying stuff from old windows install, moved my %userprofile% to a different drive, installed a bunch of programs, deleted a ton of stuff and just general housekeeping stuff.

Finally, after I was happy with the build and ready to get back to gaming/using it normally I decided to run a hdd benchmark. I know ssd caching should not improve my benchmark speeds since the tests won't be using cached data but I was curious as to how the cached drive performed and decided to test it even though I thought it would show results like a normal hdd. Because who knows maybe it would show marginal improvements or maybe it would test slow. So I found a page where ArsTechnica listed there testing software and picked a free HDD benchmark from the list. (Can't remember the name) I downloaded it and set it up to run a test on my cached hdd and another attached drive that has the same specs (WD black 1tb). Then I went to bed.

When I woke up I found my computer on the screen that shows it unexpectedly lost power and the SSD cache recovered data (I am running the cache in maximized mode. Which means the SSD does not wait for the HDD to catch up and will write data to it in a downtime. I saw this screen before because I wanted to see how maximized mode handled power failure so I forced a shut down first thing after getting it installed. I saw it run through this repair process and that all my data was recovered so I was less worried about taking advantage of maximized mode). I didn't think too much of it, powered the machine off and went to do some errands.

When I came home and tried to turn the machine on, nothing. After a short freak out I assumed I must have blown the PSU. So I went to a buddies, pulled his PSU and hooked it up, still nothing. I disconnected everything from the mobo, and still nothing. Disconnected the case power button and tried to jump it, nothing. No fans spin up, no leds on mobo light up, no beep codes, nothing nothing nothing. Dead mobo :( 

So how did running HDD benchmarks kill my mobo? Also why did it recover from the power loss but then never turn on again after I shut it down? While I am at it, anyone have any experience with warranty returns from Gigabyte?

TL;DR
Mobo died after running HDD benchmarks. How can HDD benchmarks kill a mobo?
April 2, 2012 2:57:23 PM

HothMonster said:
Hello,

This is not a help is my motherboard dead post. I know it is. This is a "how the *** did this kill my motherboard post?" I just don't understand how what killed it.

So I have a i72600k, Gigabyte ga-z68p-ud3, 8gb of g.skill ram, 4 sata drives, a GTX560TI and a 650watt Antec Earthwatts. That rig has been running for about 4 months.

Just the other day I picked up a Samsung 830 64gb SSD and set it up using intel Smart Response Tech (/Rapid Storage Tech). I did a fresh windows install and got the cache running. I spent the next 2 nights redoing my file organization, copying stuff from old windows install, moved my %userprofile% to a different drive, installed a bunch of programs, deleted a ton of stuff and just general housekeeping stuff.

Finally, after I was happy with the build and ready to get back to gaming/using it normally I decided to run a hdd benchmark. I know ssd caching should not improve my benchmark speeds since the tests won't be using cached data but I was curious as to how the cached drive performed and decided to test it even though I thought it would show results like a normal hdd. Because who knows maybe it would show marginal improvements or maybe it would test slow. So I found a page where ArsTechnica listed there testing software and picked a free HDD benchmark from the list. (Can't remember the name) I downloaded it and set it up to run a test on my cached hdd and another attached drive that has the same specs (WD black 1tb). Then I went to bed.

When I woke up I found my computer on the screen that shows it unexpectedly lost power and the SSD cache recovered data (I am running the cache in maximized mode. Which means the SSD does not wait for the HDD to catch up and will write data to it in a downtime. I saw this screen before because I wanted to see how maximized mode handled power failure so I forced a shut down first thing after getting it installed. I saw it run through this repair process and that all my data was recovered so I was less worried about taking advantage of maximized mode). I didn't think too much of it, powered the machine off and went to do some errands.

When I came home and tried to turn the machine on, nothing. After a short freak out I assumed I must have blown the PSU. So I went to a buddies, pulled his PSU and hooked it up, still nothing. I disconnected everything from the mobo, and still nothing. Disconnected the case power button and tried to jump it, nothing. No fans spin up, no leds on mobo light up, no beep codes, nothing nothing nothing. Dead mobo :( 

So how did running HDD benchmarks kill my mobo? Also why did it recover from the power loss but then never turn on again after I shut it down? While I am at it, anyone have any experience with warranty returns from Gigabyte?

TL;DR
Mobo died after running HDD benchmarks. How can HDD benchmarks kill a mobo?



Very good chance your MOBO was already defected or on its way out the HDD timimg was a coincidence. RMA the board, cause NO WAY a benchmark can kill a mobo. Before you ran the test did you check your boards temps, voltage, etc, etc?
m
0
l
April 2, 2012 3:03:58 PM

I looked over HWmonitor after installing the cache, probably about 48 hours before death. Didn't notice anything odd with my voltage. Machine was well ventilated definitely not a heat issue. Was not overclocking.
m
0
l
!