What the proccessor frequency contribute?

The frequency all processors differ but what these frequency contribute to the computer.please be specific.thanks:)
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More about what proccessor frequency contribute
  1. Ummm ... yeah.

    We're not going to do your homework for you. Thanks for playing though.
  2. More speed? Greater FPS (frames per second). Better benchmarks.
  3. jsc said:
    More speed? Greater FPS (frames per second). Better benchmarks.



    hmmm.
  4. basically how fast the clock cycles are measured in hertz
    "A single clock cycle (typically shorter than a nanosecond in modern non-embedded microprocessors) toggles between a logical zero and a logical one state"
    -source Wikipedia -
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clock_rate
    but there is also IPS or instructions per second that can processed
    so a 3.4 ghz Pentium D with older ineffecient design cannot complete
    as many IPS as for example a I series CPU
    so a combination of higher frequency combined with faster IPS execution
    leads to a faster machine
    it is a balance between both

    I think I got that right but if you dont get an A on the test
    dont yell at me :)
  5. I was being a bit of a smartass up above. :)

    king smp said:
    basically how fast the clock cycles are measured in hertz
    "A single clock cycle (typically shorter than a nanosecond in modern non-embedded microprocessors) toggles between a logical zero and a logical one state"
    -source Wikipedia -

    Not entirely accurate for clock cycles. A clock cycle is typically around 3 - 5 nanoseconds.
    Clock cycles X CPU multiplier = core speed of processor.

    Very accurate for processor cycles.
  6. jsc said:
    I was being a bit of a smartass up above. :)


    Not entirely accurate for clock cycles. A clock cycle is typically around 3 - 5 nanoseconds.
    Clock cycles X CPU multiplier = core speed of processor.

    Very accurate for processor cycles.



    I am still learning so bear with me :)

    how does FSB tie into the formula?
    since I am used to
    FSB X Multi = Core Frequency

    so I am a little confused
  7. jsc said:
    I was being a bit of a smartass up above. :)


    Not entirely accurate for clock cycles. A clock cycle is typically around 3 - 5 nanoseconds.
    Clock cycles X CPU multiplier = core speed of processor.

    Very accurate for processor cycles.



    can i calculate the clock cycles and cpu multiplier from its specifications
    ?
  8. Not all "GHz" are created equally, in as much as work actually being done....

    The current i5 SandyBridge 2500 CPUs at 3.3 Ghz or so completely dominate most other processors clocked at 3.3 Ghz.....; in fact, they also dominate many other older processors clocked much higher.

    In most gaming benchmarks, the Phenom X4, for example, must be clocked at about 4.3 Ghz or higher (vary rare) to equal the i5-2500....; the older Pentium 4 designs would need to be clocked at 5 Ghz or so to compete due to the newer processors' architechture/improved IPC.....
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