Solved

How to use an anti static wrist strap?

How exactly do you use an anti static wrist strap?
- Do you have your PC unplugged?
- Where do you clip the alligator clip?
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about anti static wrist strap
  1. Best answer
    Yes you unplug the pc from the wall.
    You put the strap on your wrist and then you clip the alligator clip to the bare metal part of the case.
    This effectively puts your body at the same voltage potential as the entire pc...thereby eliminating any posible static discharge and damage to the pc.
    Hope this helps...JQ
  2. Best answer selected by Eelectroman.
  3. do not unplug the pc from the wall, just turn off the power supply switch, then connect the alligator clip the bare metal part of the case. remember we need ground...:)
  4. jtamad said:
    do not unplug the pc from the wall, just turn off the power supply switch, then connect the alligator clip the bare metal part of the case. remember we need ground...:)



    @jtamad-You must be crazy to think that keeping the computer plug on while working on the boards is safe, sounds like you want to electrolucte somebody.

    NEVER HAVE THE COMPUTER PLUGGED IN WHILE SERVICING THE COMPUTER ON ANY RELATED MANNER, PERIOD.
  5. @jtamad-You must be crazy to think that keeping the computer plug on while working on the boards is safe, sounds like you want to electrolucte somebody.

    NEVER HAVE THE COMPUTER PLUGGED IN WHILE SERVICING THE COMPUTER ON ANY RELATED MANNER, PERIOD.

    @markds4idmedic no you are wrong actually..... if you are using the computers bare metal as the ground then you should leave the power cord PLUGED IN if how ever you take a different route and say clip that alligator clip on some other bare metal surface that's grounded then you want your computer unplugged ex:another plugged in computer your not working on.......... Yes you want your computer to have no power to it but if you unplug the computer and try to use the casing as a ground it wont work too well. Besides when installing most of the components you want these for it calls for minimal to no actual contact between you and a sensitive part of the motherboard. unless your really getting into your computer and swapping out something you shouldn't be touching. THIS IS CORRECT INFORMATION!
  6. hunterinmck said:
    @jtamad-You must be crazy to think that keeping the computer plug on while working on the boards is safe, sounds like you want to electrolucte somebody.

    NEVER HAVE THE COMPUTER PLUGGED IN WHILE SERVICING THE COMPUTER ON ANY RELATED MANNER, PERIOD.


    @markds4idmedic no you are wrong actually..... if you are using the computers bare metal as the ground then you should leave the power cord PLUGED IN if how ever you take a different route and say clip that alligator clip on some other bare metal surface that's grounded then you want your computer unplugged ex:another plugged in computer your not working on.......... Yes you want your computer to have no power to it but if you unplug the computer and try to use the casing as a ground it wont work too well. Besides when installing most of the components you want these for it calls for minimal to no actual contact between you and a sensitive part of the motherboard. unless your really getting into your computer and swapping out something you shouldn't be touching. THIS IS CORRECT INFORMATION!



    The correct answer is FOR THE ONE WHO ASKED IT. It is obvious to me that he is not a certified electrician/electronics and/or communications engineer/technician otherwise he would not be asking this question, because he would already know this.

    You do not tell a guy who does not seem to know how to even use an ohmeter or voltmer to just keep it plugged in based on your conditional answers.

    Know your audience before your respond. I don't give information irresponsibly.
  7. Mark Delfino said:
    hunterinmck said:
    @jtamad-You must be crazy to think that keeping the computer plug on while working on the boards is safe, sounds like you want to electrolucte somebody.

    NEVER HAVE THE COMPUTER PLUGGED IN WHILE SERVICING THE COMPUTER ON ANY RELATED MANNER, PERIOD.


    @markds4idmedic no you are wrong actually..... if you are using the computers bare metal as the ground then you should leave the power cord PLUGED IN if how ever you take a different route and say clip that alligator clip on some other bare metal surface that's grounded then you want your computer unplugged ex:another plugged in computer your not working on.......... Yes you want your computer to have no power to it but if you unplug the computer and try to use the casing as a ground it wont work too well. Besides when installing most of the components you want these for it calls for minimal to no actual contact between you and a sensitive part of the motherboard. unless your really getting into your computer and swapping out something you shouldn't be touching. THIS IS CORRECT INFORMATION!



    The correct answer is FOR THE ONE WHO ASKED IT. It is obvious to me that he is not a certified electrician/electronics and/or communications engineer/technician otherwise he would not be asking this question, because he would already know this.

    You do not tell a guy who does not seem to know how to even use an ohmeter or voltmer to just keep it plugged in based on your conditional answers.

    Know your audience before your respond. I don't give information irresponsibly.

    If you unplug the power cord aren't you removing the ground? Making the wrist strap useless?
  8. The purpose of a "grounding strap" is misleading: it does not attempt to ground your body, per se, but rather maintain zero electrostatic potential between you and the computer, therefore preventing damage. When you do plug the computer back in (if you unplugged it in the first place) it will reconnect and ground out any static built up in the computer, which won't damage anything as long as your PSU isn't some generic Szongzheng bs. While ill-advised, you should be safe in operating with a switched-off PSU (as long as it isn't aforementioned generic bs - PSU carraige is always grounded out, as is AC circuitry); after all, the greatest possible voltage discharge is 12+ DC, which could tingle a "little bit" but could otherwise only damage components. Now please lords and masters of electrickery, disprove me.
  9. You're all arguing about a dumb subject.
    Unless your on a rug moving back and forth or getting a balloon rubbed against you while working on something or right before, there is no need for these antistatic clamps. 98% of electronics repair will not be disturbed by you shocking a device as long as you're aware of your situation. Did you wash your hands before beginning work? You all set. Did you happen to get shocked in some other instance before beginning work on a device? Everybody that works with electrical devices has gotten a shock at some point, it just happens. From a device, flipping a light switch, etc. It happens... Just have some common sense when working on low-voltage equipment and touch something metal before diving in to the task at hand.

    Always unplug a PC or whatever device you are working on. If it was just drawing power, than you must drain the retaining power. Always press the power button after disconnecting your power source.* Whether it's a plug into a power supply on a desktop or micro PC or Pi, Battery on a laptop, etc. You must drain the current from the circuitry. Than you can work on anything without worry unless you get into soldering and working on the PCB itself.

    * FLIPPING THE SWITCH ON A PSU ISN'T GOOD ENOUGH AND FOR BATTERY DEVICES, REMOVING YOUR CHARGE CORD DOESN'T QUALIFY.
    Remove the entire situation where a current can reside. Even the CMOS battery can disturb you if a metal arch between that and another piece of metal so watch your tools. IFIXIT makes some great none metal tools; Pliers, Tweezers, even screw bits, check it out... That's just my own personal recommendation so don't dog me for mentioning them.
Ask a new question

Read More

Homebuilt Systems