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GPU Overheating

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 18, 2011 7:53:16 PM

Hello,
I am curious, I have a EVGA GTX460 and it runs very, very hot like around 85-95 on a full load. However my gameplay experience doesn't lower based on temp. Is that normal? Is the reason my card is so hot a bad heatsink and fan? Or is it just that its pushing that card too much. I ask because if seems like if the card was being pushed hard by the game you'd see performance issues not just the temp rising. Thanks in advance!

More about : gpu overheating

February 18, 2011 8:01:14 PM

it's possible for pixel shaders to add load to a card without harming performance.

example. Team Fortress2 has low pixel shader usage compared to flashier games. When a special effect happens, it may not affect my FPS at all because it just makes use of un-used shaders.

While this would cause my heat to increase, my performance would not be hurt.

A game that makes use of pixel shaders all the time my run hotter, but if it doesn't overload your shader units, it may not hurt performance.

that is quite warm though. you should get more circulation.

If it makes you feel any better, my ATI4850 has been running 108c(55c idle) for the past 2.5 years of game playing. about 6 hours per day average, and it jumped up to 108c within a minute or two.

I gave my 4850 to my brother about two weeks ago, so it still works fine after those 2.5 years of abuse :p 
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a c 130 U Graphics card
February 18, 2011 8:01:37 PM

For a GTX460 that's not too great. I'd try to move a few things around in your case, and check the card for dust. Also, the more visual the game the less FPS you're going to get. That means the card is working harder and will become hotter.
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February 18, 2011 8:06:07 PM

ohh ohhh

I bought this to help my computer a while back

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I got the non-led version, but I just wanted to show you something useful.

The rear fan is pivotable 180 degrees. You can aim it up or down. I put it under my card to blow air directly at the GPU.
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a b U Graphics card
February 18, 2011 8:07:41 PM

That's way too hot for a GTX 460. GTX 460's normally run at about 60C-70C at load. What case do you have? It is possible you have a bad card/poorly mounted heatsink.
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February 18, 2011 8:17:46 PM

The card runs great except for the temp, would it be considered bad or need to be rma'd for temp only?

Also those fans are what I was looking at as a solution. It's nice to hear while I find a solution I won't destroy the card!

I assume poorly mounted heatsink would refer to the conneciton to the gpu? Would CPU goop(all that I have at the moment) do the trick if it needed more?

CoolerMaster Elite 310 Mid-Tower Case with See-Thru Side Panel [-25] (Blue Color) is the case. It doesn't have alot of circulation but even when I remove the side panel and let it run open the temps still rise just as high.
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a c 125 U Graphics card
February 18, 2011 9:03:21 PM

I would add a fan to the panel so blow more cool air in, in addition to the front intake and rear exhaust (hoping you have those)

Aside from that, if you have really hot ambient room temps then not much you can do, but:

1) Remove GPU cover and check heat sink for dust - clean it
2) Remove heat sink and reapply with new TIM
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February 18, 2011 9:15:06 PM

I know something of computers, helped my brother build his and I put it together(not much I know). Would checking the graphics card be a dangerous thing to do or is it fairly straight forward?
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a c 125 U Graphics card
February 18, 2011 9:48:01 PM

Bryan1218 said:
I know something of computers, helped my brother build his and I put it together(not much I know). Would checking the graphics card be a dangerous thing to do or is it fairly straight forward?


It's pretty simple, usually just a bunch of tiny screws to take the cover off. At that point nothing can really go wrong beyond a bad fall or a big static electricity shock.

For taking off the heat sink to reapply, it's a standard procedure and you can look up guides for either GPUs or CPUs. But basically you just need to clean off the old TIM really well (using a rubbing alcohol with non particulate cloth works well) and apply a small amount of new TIM ($10 for Arctic Silver 5). Then just carefully reattach it, being very careful to apply even pressure. Some people suggest putting your finger inside a plastic sandwich bag and spreading the TIM a little first.
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February 18, 2011 9:57:50 PM

Thanks for the help! I'll give it a shot.
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February 19, 2011 2:16:17 AM

I don't know how you people's cards run so hot, I am using powercolor hd4870 1 gig(stalker edition non-pcs) at 35c room temp , it runs @ 45c idle & 70c load @800/920 clocks , hd4870 was supposed to be hot card isn't it ?
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a c 255 U Graphics card
February 19, 2011 6:23:29 AM

I Applied IC Diamond to my EVGA GTX460 now it idles at 27-29C and never goes over 65C even using Furmark and that is overclocked to 821-1642-2000. Aftermarket TIM can really help some cards. It's the EE or external exhaust model with the supposed least efficient cooler of the GTX460 series too.
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