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AMD 3D, Why is it so complicated?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 20, 2011 8:16:00 PM

I just upgraded the first half of my system (CPU/MB/RAM/Case) Next on the list is a GPU. My main reason for wanting a new GPU is so I can do 3D. Now, I want to stick with AMD, most likely the 6950 is what I'll be going for, but after googling all day I've come to the conclusion that AMDs 3D offerings are far more complicated than they need to be. With nVidia you just get the 3D vision kit and a 120hz monitor and you're good to go. I still (after looking for all day) have no idea how to do 3D on an AMD GPU. What is it you need? What monitors are compatible and how do you actually do it? I don't want to go back to nVidia but I want 3D more than I want to be loyal to ATI (AMD now).

Any advice would be great, especially from somebody who has got an AMD GPU working with a 3D monitor. (for the record, I want a 22"-24" monitor)

More about : amd complicated

February 20, 2011 8:27:44 PM

iz3d
February 20, 2011 8:37:32 PM

I looked at them but they don't make monitors anymore, and IZ3D supports a pile of different kinds of monitors but which ones in specific, surely it won't support nvidia's monitors?
Related resources
a c 118 À AMD
February 20, 2011 8:42:48 PM

Here's a link on how to setup 3D with an AMD GPU. The article is specifically for setting up 3D with a 3D HDTV, but the steps should be the same for a 120Hz monitor.

The primary difference between a 3D HDTV and 120Hz monitor is that on a 3D HDTV the 3D mode only works in 48Hz mode. That's 24Hz per eye. It still only has 60Hz input.

3D monitors requires a dual linked 60Hz connection (DVI or HDMI). That works out to 60Hz per eye.

AMD HD3D Technology – What You Should’ve Know from the Start.
http://3dvision-blog.com/amd-hd3d-technology-what-you-s...
a c 153 À AMD
February 20, 2011 8:47:45 PM

The big question is why do you insist on AMD when the Nvidia option is so much better? If your pride or folly is still getting in the way of your ambitions, then be aware that, even if you do get all the proper hardware and everything set up, you will be limited to drivers provided by the manufacturer of your aftermarket 3D system, there will be no support from AMD (maybe not such a bad thing?), and no games will officially be supported. If you ever decide to go for a dual-GPU setup, often a wise choice given the demands of 3D gaming, AMD does not support dual GPU Crossfire for HD3D. You will be limited to a single GPU.
http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-r...
February 21, 2011 12:22:48 AM

Seems like AMD really screwed up 3D then... The way they've done it seems very lazy. My only gripe with nVidia 3d was that you were limited to using nvidia monitors, but now that I've researched some more, seems like you can buy a driver addon to let you use the HDMI 1.4a on any 3D TV recent. Going with 3D, nVidia seems to easily be the best option...

What nVidia card would you suggest? If I went with nVidia over AMD. I know nothing of nVidia and what is best, Price wise the 560ti seems to be the equivilent of the 6950. Are any nVidia cards better than others for 3D gaming?
February 21, 2011 1:32:23 AM

hero9989 said:
Seems like AMD really screwed up 3D then... The way they've done it seems very lazy. My only gripe with nVidia 3d was that you were limited to using nvidia monitors, but now that I've researched some more, seems like you can buy a driver addon to let you use the HDMI 1.4a on any 3D TV recent. Going with 3D, nVidia seems to easily be the best option...

What nVidia card would you suggest? If I went with nVidia over AMD. I know nothing of nVidia and what is best, Price wise the 560ti seems to be the equivilent of the 6950. Are any nVidia cards better than others for 3D gaming?


AMD were focusing on Eyefinity and probably weren't too optimistic about 3D before. It's just 2010 when manufacturer's started upping the hype on 3D TV's, which meant that now more and more homes are starting to have 3D capable sets.

The 560Ti seems to be a solid enough choice (newest chip revision, a bit lower heat and power consumption).
a c 153 À AMD
February 21, 2011 5:26:36 AM

Depending on your price range:
GTX 560: ~$250
GTX 570: ~$350
GTX 580: ~$500

The GTX 560 is a real good overclocker and can match or nearly match the GTX 570 when overclocked. Of course, the GTX 570 can also be overclocked.
February 21, 2011 5:54:40 AM

17seconds said:
Depending on your price range:
GTX 560: ~$250
GTX 570: ~$350
GTX 580: ~$500

The GTX 560 is a real good overclocker and can match or nearly match the GTX 570 when overclocked. Of course, the GTX 570 can also be overclocked.


The 560 also contains some improvements on the hardware level compared to the 570 (though the difference is a bit small)


http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/nvidia-geforce-gtx-...
February 21, 2011 8:33:57 AM

How's the 560 in terms of heat? I know it uses a good 60w over my current 5770 but what's the heat like on it? I have a stock cooled 5770 and it hits about 60 degrees under load in furmark. I have a small(ish) case so I don't want to have a too power hungry card that'll get really hot and certainly don't want to be going sli/crossfire as that'll destroy airflow in my case.
Never heard of KFA2 but This Seems like a good price. Looks like a good cooler to me and a good price.
a b À AMD
June 6, 2011 11:25:09 AM

i honestly dont see the point of 3d unless its wall size.
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