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CPU running at lower clocks?

Last response: in CPUs
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July 26, 2011 10:26:43 PM

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/148/captureblq.jpg...
my cpu is supposed to run at 2.5 ghz
but as you can see it is way lower
i dont think i have intel speedstep
help!
a b à CPUs
July 26, 2011 10:32:55 PM

If you notice, that's showing information for Core #0, not both combined. On the lower right you'll also notice where it says, "Cores: 2".

So, 1199.9 x 2 = 2,399.8 = ~2.4GHz.
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a c 126 à CPUs
July 26, 2011 10:38:38 PM

calmstateofmind said:
If you notice, that's showing information for Core #0, not both combined. On the lower right you'll also notice where it says, "Cores: 2".

So, 1199.9 x 2 = 2,399.8 = ~2.4GHz.


This is incorrect. The CPU is a dual core and both cores run at a maximum of 2.5GHz when under load. But when the CPU is idle, Speedstep is active and lowers the speed to its lowest possible based on the multiplier, for which yours is 6x. The maximum multiplier yours can do is 12.5x which at a 200MHz FSB would be 2.5GHz per core.

http://ark.intel.com/products/37212/Intel-Pentium-Proce...(2M-Cache-2_50-GHz-800-MHz-FSB)

Per Intels site. And yes you do have Speedstep. Speedstep has been in every Intel CPU since Core 2 was launched and your Pentium DC E5200 is based on the 45nm Core 2 processor architecture.

If you want to see your CPU running at 2.5GHz, run Prime 95 with CPUZ open and it will jump to 2.5GHz. Then turn off Prime95 and it will drop back down to 1.2GHz.
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a b à CPUs
July 26, 2011 10:42:33 PM

Well then, I stand corrected. +1 to you. :) 
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July 26, 2011 10:47:07 PM

Best answer selected by rivman.
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July 26, 2011 10:47:27 PM

thanks jimmy.speedstep sucks
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a c 126 à CPUs
July 26, 2011 11:04:57 PM

You can disable Speedstep in the BIOS but there is really no need. I have a Q6600 that runs idle 2GHz but under load goes to 3GHz. And from what I have seen, it clocks to its top speed when under about 20% load.

For the most part, when your system needs it it will clock up to 2.5GHz. So when gaming or running a CPU intensive application it will stay at 2.5GHz until you close it.
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