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What is hyper transport?

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Last response: in Memory
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April 10, 2012 3:09:19 AM

i never understood how HT worked... my mobo supports up to 4800. so what does that mean? does it have to do with memory? i have a fx4100, 8 GB of 1600 mhz ram and an ASUS M5A97 motherboard thank you

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April 10, 2012 3:33:57 AM

hyper transport is amds interconnect between the north and south bridge of the mobo
April 10, 2012 3:35:32 AM

neon neophyte said:
hyper transport is amds interconnect between the north and south bridge of the mobo


ok what does it do?
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April 10, 2012 3:41:16 AM

brings your north and south bridge together as a cohesive unit. basically, all the features of a motherboard arent ran off the same chip. theres 2. one handles the cpu and ram etc (i think) possible hard drives or something, while the other handles everything else (i think.) the concept is something like that, dont quote me on specifics.

you wont notice performance gains by having more bandwidth than you can use between the north and south bridge, however, nicer cpus and gpus and more peripherals and hard drives can saturate the bandwidth between the north and south bridge if the interconnect doesnt have enough bandwidth. this can cause a system to perform far under what it should. its like completely saturating anything with bandwidth, it becomes a bottleneck.

hyper transport is amds connection between the north and south bridge, if i recall, it has a lot of bandwidth.

sorry for the mess of this explanation, im pulling it off the top of my head
a b } Memory
April 10, 2012 4:41:39 AM

Neons answer is only mostly correct. HT is just a bus like FSB of old. It is a serial bus that can connect parts of the computer together. I haven't stayed up to date on the most recent chips, but I'll shoot from what I remember about when HT first came out.

Each AMD CPU had three HT "links". The first connects the CPUs memory controller to the RAM. The second connects to either the NB in the older chips, or the SB in the newer chips seeing as the NB has moved "on die". The third one isn't used in consumer chips but server chips use the last (or if really high end server chips there will be more then 3) HT link to connect to other CPUs. In any case each of these "links" is used to allow the transfer of data. If a CPU wants info from RAM, then it accesses it through a HT link.

The "4800" is just the speed at which the link can operate at. Higher numbers equal faster data transfers. Like with SATA however just because you have "4800" doesn't mean the ram can operate at that speed so you'd still be limited by the slowest device. HT is also bi directional. So some places might list it as only 2400 instead of 4800MTs.

Google/wiki is your friend. Why did I have to type all that out if the info is already there?
April 10, 2012 8:33:05 AM

4745454b said:
Neons answer is only mostly correct. HT is just a bus like FSB of old. It is a serial bus that can connect parts of the computer together. I haven't stayed up to date on the most recent chips, but I'll shoot from what I remember about when HT first came out.

Each AMD CPU had three HT "links". The first connects the CPUs memory controller to the RAM. The second connects to either the NB in the older chips, or the SB in the newer chips seeing as the NB has moved "on die". The third one isn't used in consumer chips but server chips use the last (or if really high end server chips there will be more then 3) HT link to connect to other CPUs. In any case each of these "links" is used to allow the transfer of data. If a CPU wants info from RAM, then it accesses it through a HT link.

The "4800" is just the speed at which the link can operate at. Higher numbers equal faster data transfers. Like with SATA however just because you have "4800" doesn't mean the ram can operate at that speed so you'd still be limited by the slowest device. HT is also bi directional. So some places might list it as only 2400 instead of 4800MTs.

Google/wiki is your friend. Why did I have to type all that out if the info is already there?


thansk alot lol ! i was actually thinking it was like bus speed but i wasnt sure... i remember the socket 775 days of intel with a FSB of up to 1333 mhz so i was thinking that was it. so in other words if i wanted to increase some performance i can take my HT at 2000mhz and bump it up to a max of 2400 mhz with this mobo
a b } Memory
April 10, 2012 3:17:39 PM

But as I said earlier it won't really make any difference.
!