Ivy Bridge

I am planning a new computer. I am going to purchase a piece at a time. I am considering the 1155 socket Z68 MB. I just want to be sure that the Ivy Bridge CPU will work with it. It is had to figure what Intel will be doing down the road. From what I have found on the web it will, but I would like to get a better idea how far the 1155 will go. I would appreciate any information.
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  1. As far as we know LGA1155 will go to Ivy Bridge with full support, probably with a BIOS update. As for Haswel (the arch after Ivy Bridge) I think it will be a new socket as major arch changes sometimes need it but there is no 100% right now.
  2. Intel typically has about a 2 year life expectancy for their sockets. Therefore, until Intel releases more information, you can assume socket 1155 CPU's will be produced until early 2013 at the latest. After that it's R.I.P.
  3. if you are buying seperately watch out for returns on faulty components.
  4. Thanks for the info. I have built 2 computers a piece at a time and have been lucky. No problems.
  5. jimmysmitty is mostly correct. However, for full feature support, you need to buy a P67 or Z68 board that specifically has PCIe 3.0 built in. Those are few and far between right now.

    Also, when Ivy Bridge comes out, new chipsets will too (the 75 and 77 series). Those will have full feature support, and will be LGA 1155 like current P67/Z68 boards.
  6. SInce it seems probable that even SB-E/socket 2011's integration of PCIe 3.0 will be delayed, I doubt it will be an essential feature included in socket 1155 Ivy Bridge...
  7. Getting piece by piece is not that good. By the time you finish getting all your parts, some will be outdated. Its ok starting with case, fan, monitor, power supply, keyboard, mouse, speakers and HDD, but you need to get memory, motherboard, cpu, videocard and ssd all at once

    Ivy bridge will increase speed, but is it worth waiting 6 months? At firtst glance, the new chipsets wont give anyting new thats important. Get an i5 now. Unless you are waiting for SSD prices to drop more...
  8. jaguarskx said:
    Intel typically has about a 2 year life expectancy for their sockets. Therefore, until Intel releases more information, you can assume socket 1155 CPU's will be produced until early 2013 at the latest. After that it's R.I.P.


    Except, strangley, LGA775 which was put out in June of 2004 and was not retired until Nehalem came out in November of 2009. A little over 5 years.

    but for the most part this is right and honestly I prefer Intel trying to utilize every aspect of a CPU by having the best power layout for the socket and such instead of trying to rearrange the CPU for the socket and cutting features.

    Anonymous said:
    SInce it seems probable that even SB-E/socket 2011's integration of PCIe 3.0 will be delayed, I doubt it will be an essential feature included in socket 1155 Ivy Bridge...


    I have seen a slide that stated that SB-E will come with 3 levels of chipsets and the highest end will still include PCIe 3.0. Can't remember where though. As for Ivy Bridge, it will have the H/P7 series chipsets and I haven't seen anything about PCIe 3.0 support but then again there is no info on them yet.

    Besides, a PCIe 2.0 x8 bus is not even saturated by a single GPU let alone a PCIe 2.0 x16. Only quad CFX/tri SLI would benefit from PCIe 3.0 if at all.
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