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ND filter

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Anonymous
February 21, 2005 5:45:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi there

I have a question about Natural Density (Gray filters). If you consider
the images on my site www.sigma2.dk How can I then benefit from
applying a ND filter to my camera ? Is it not possible to apply an
effect in PS that will do the same ?

regs,

Mads Voigt
www.sigma2.dk

More about : filter

Anonymous
February 21, 2005 11:57:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Sigma2 wrote:

> Hi there
>
> I have a question about Natural Density (Gray filters). If you consider
> the images on my site www.sigma2.dk How can I then benefit from
> applying a ND filter to my camera ? Is it not possible to apply an
> effect in PS that will do the same ?
>
> regs,
>
> Mads Voigt
> www.sigma2.dk
>
Use of an ND filter is basically the same as changing ISO (speed). If,
for instance you wanted to shoot at a very large aperture (low f/#), and
your fastest shutter speed overexposes the scene, then a ND filter would
allow you to shoot at that f/# without overexposing.

I am not sure your scene is overexposed. I do see flare. Make sure
your lens is scrupulously clean. Backlit scenes also really stress the
flare performance of camera and lens.
Anonymous
February 21, 2005 2:19:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

An ND filter reduces the amount of light entering the lens... therefore for
correct exposure a slower shutter speed or larger aperture is required.

The 'benefit' of larger aperture is less depth of field which can otherwise
be hard to achieve with a lot of light about (sunny beaches, snow etc).

It could also be used to give a slower shutter speed for motion blur
effects.

Guy


Sigma2 wrote:
> Hi there
>
> I have a question about Natural Density (Gray filters). If you
> consider the images on my site www.sigma2.dk How can I then benefit
> from applying a ND filter to my camera ? Is it not possible to apply
> an effect in PS that will do the same ?
>
> regs,
>
> Mads Voigt
> www.sigma2.dk
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Anonymous
February 21, 2005 7:58:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Sigma2 wrote:
>
> Hi there
>
> I have a question about Natural Density (Gray filters).

Neutral density.

the only reason for ND filters is to reduce the light
at the time of the picture.

this lets you shoot wide open f stop,
or long shutter speed
to blur or unblur something.

once the picture is shot, no need for ND.


> If you consider
> the images on my site www.sigma2.dk How can I then benefit from
> applying a ND filter to my camera ? Is it not possible to apply an
> effect in PS that will do the same ?
>
> regs,
>
> Mads Voigt
> www.sigma2.dk
February 22, 2005 12:12:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1108982752.217839.38070@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
galleryin@gmail.com says...
>
>Hi there
>
>I have a question about Natural Density (Gray filters). If you consider
>the images on my site www.sigma2.dk How can I then benefit from
>applying a ND filter to my camera ? Is it not possible to apply an
>effect in PS that will do the same ?
>
>regs,
>
>Mads Voigt
>www.sigma2.dk

Mads,

An ND filter is used to reduce the light reaching the film/sensor. With a film
camera, it is helpful if your film is rated at too high an ISO for the scene,
but with digital, adjusting the ISO of the sensor will do the same thing.
Next, an ND, used per above, will allow a longer shutter speed, or wider
aperture for less DOF. In your images, only the first might gain anything with
an ND. The "ripples" on the water would smooth out some, but otherwise, I see
no need/use for ND. You certainly (I don't think) would not want a more
shallow DOF with the bird. Moving water is one of the subjects where an ND
will come most in handy. Falling water is one of the best examples, as it
turns into a gossimer veil, when the shutter speed is adequately long enough.
Shooting "street scenes" with moving people can benefit, as you can keep the
shutter open much longer, allowing the people to move about (don't let them
stand still too long), and not register on the film.

Hunt
!