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Need advice on memory

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April 13, 2012 1:42:23 PM

upgrading/building a new system and looking at this this memory.. or what would you recommend for this board if you buying it? thanks in advance for any reply's!


AMD Performance Edition 8GB 2X4GB PC3-12800U DDR3 1600MHz 8-9-8 1.65V Memory Module

http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=67361&vpn=AP38G1608U2K...

for

MSI Z77A-G43 ATX LGA1155 Z77 DDR3 2PCI-E16 1PCI-E1 3PCI SATA3 DVI HDMI VGA DX11 USB3.0 Motherboard

http://www.ncix.ca/products/?sku=69230&vpn=Z77A%2DG43&m...


it will be for i5-2500k, 7870 video, gaming rig.

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a c 108 } Memory
April 13, 2012 2:15:10 PM

I am doubtful that you want 1.65v ram for a 2500K. I think the ram is standard ram that needs to be overclocked to 1.65v to reach 1600 speeds.
I would be better to stick with standard 1.5v ram.

The current Intel nehalem and sandy bridge cpu's have an excellent integrated ram controller. It is able to keep the cpu fed with data from any speed ram.
The difference in real application performance or FPS between the fastest and slowest ram is on the order of 1-3%.

Synthetic benchmark differences will be impressive, but are largely irrelevant in the real world.

Fancy heat spreaders are mostly marketing too.

Only if you are seeking record level overclocks should you consider faster ram or better latencies.
Read this Anandtech article on memory scaling:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/4503/sandy-bridge-memory-...
---------------bottom line------------

DDR3 1600 is the sweet spot.

You want documented ram compatibility. If you should ever have a problem, you want supported ram.
Otherwise, you risk a finger pointing battle between the ram and motherboard support sites, claiming "not my problem".
One place to check is your motherboards web site.
Look for the ram QVL list. It lists all of the ram kits that have been tested with that particular motherboard.
Sometimes the QVL list is not updated after the motherboard is released.
For more current info, go to a ram vendor's web site and access their ram selection configurator.
Enter your motherboard, and you will get a list of compatible ram kits.
While today's motherboards are more tolerant of different ram, it makes sense to buy ram that is known to work and is supported.
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April 13, 2012 2:25:27 PM

Best answer selected by PickledGopher.
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a c 146 } Memory
April 13, 2012 2:48:42 PM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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