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A-Data DDR3 2000g question.

Last response: in Memory
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April 13, 2012 3:20:48 PM

I currently have a 4GB dual memory set of A-Data DDR3 2000g memory.
Is been running "fine" but I always noticed that it was slower than advertised.

Today I decided to take a "deeper look" at it, changed a few things in the Bios... and the nightmare began.


This memory if I understand correctly it should run at 2000Mhz instead I see:
667 MHz on cpuid.
Everything is:
Dram Frequency 667 MHz
FSB 2:10
9- 9 -9 - 24
NB frequency 2134.6 MHz

I couldn't even get to Windows for a long time (still crossing my fingers as I type this) :kaola: 

The Motherboard is: EVGA P55 SLI E653
Bios version 080016 / date 05/06/2010
a b } Memory
April 13, 2012 3:55:02 PM

What you are seeing is memory running at default DDR3 speeds (multiply the 667 x2 and you get 1333 which is the standard speed). Your RAM is "rated" to run at 2000 by the manufacturer.

To get to that speed, you will have to manually set the memory timings in your BIOS to match the rated settings of the memory itself.

All that being said, overclocking memory (running beyond the standard speed) always carries some risk of making your system unstable. Just keep that in mind when you start tweaking your settings.

If your system is starting really slowly, it is likely not the memory speed causing the problem, rather it is some other issue. Is this a new system or have you upgraded something lately?

Have fun!!!
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April 13, 2012 4:46:02 PM

COLGeek said:
What you are seeing is memory running at default DDR3 speeds (multiply the 667 x2 and you get 1333 which is the standard speed). Your RAM is "rated" to run at 2000 by the manufacturer.

To get to that speed, you will have to manually set the memory timings in your BIOS to match the rated settings of the memory itself.

All that being said, overclocking memory (running beyond the standard speed) always carries some risk of making your system unstable. Just keep that in mind when you start tweaking your settings.

If your system is starting really slowly, it is likely not the memory speed causing the problem, rather it is some other issue. Is this a new system or have you upgraded something lately?

Have fun!!!


This build is about a year old, (planing to upgrade the memory at some time to 16GB *the maximum possible on this motherboard)

But in the meantime I want to fully understand how to make what I have now a bit faster.
(memory only) not really interested on overclocking the CPU.

Like I mentioned, I did try a few things on the Bios this morning, and it was a disaster that lasted about an hour...
(I couldn't keep the system ON long enough to edit/save anything on the Bios) it would shut down almost immediately.

Finally is been running (back to normal) for about 2 hours now.

But this doesn't solve the question: Is it possible to make my ram faster?
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April 13, 2012 5:30:23 PM

Since you have lots probelms, I'd reset the CMOS jumpers to set your BIOS back to default.

Then go into the BIOS to "tweak" it's setting. If your mobo and memory support XMP, set the memory to that, else 1333, and see if it boots up. (Oh, you already got there.)

You can then increase your memory settings. BUT, I wouldn't go much beyond 1600, even if yours is rated at 2000. You won't notice the difference.

Pushing memory beyond that requires timing and voltage setting adjustments, which I doubt you can do without proper documentation. DDR3-1600 has been found to be the "sweat-spot" for Sandy Bride CPUs.

And the shutting down is most likely related to memory settings.
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April 13, 2012 7:33:58 PM

foscooter said:
Since you have lots probelms, I'd reset the CMOS jumpers to set your BIOS back to default.

Then go into the BIOS to "tweak" it's setting. If your mobo and memory support XMP, set the memory to that, else 1333, and see if it boots up. (Oh, you already got there.)

You can then increase your memory settings. BUT, I wouldn't go much beyond 1600, even if yours is rated at 2000. You won't notice the difference.

Pushing memory beyond that requires timing and voltage setting adjustments, which I doubt you can do without proper documentation. DDR3-1600 has been found to be the "sweat-spot" for Sandy Bride CPUs.

And the shutting down is most likely related to memory settings.


I had to reset the CMOS again, 3-4 times.... edit the Bios over a few times.... this time left the memory on Default Settings.

Still took a lot of rebooting / Windows repair.... and finally "I'm back".

check the computer of one of my roommates (which I also built) and I know the memory/motherboard etc are different,
yet when I check on cpuid on his system he has the same ram speed as I do. (he just has more ram) 12GB to be exact.

Note: I'm doing all this tests / questions now because I want to upgrade my ram in the near future.
near future=1 year +/- from 4GB to 16GB, and I want to know what would be by best choices.
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April 20, 2012 12:03:52 AM

I have noticed / learned that I need (more like have to) overclocked the CPU first.
But I still don't know how. :( 
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a b } Memory
April 20, 2012 2:21:07 AM

I would suggest you start a new thread to seek help on OCing your CPU. When you post the question in the right section (Overclocking), be sure to list all of your components (especially the CPU model, make/model of motherboard and RAM, and make/model of your video card, also include the make and model of your power supply and tell us what heatsink/fan you are using).

Doing this will get you better assistance from the forum.

Good luck!
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April 27, 2012 3:19:30 AM

Best answer selected by drwho1.
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a c 146 } Memory
April 27, 2012 4:37:30 AM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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