Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Definitely need some help with a PSU

Last response: in Components
Share
July 30, 2011 6:00:59 AM

So after spending a couple hours gawking over different PSUs, and trying to figure out what was actually relevant in a quality PSU, I decided to admit defeat. I do realize a good PSU will serve you better than most other components over time, so getting it right in the first place is key for me. (and I'm sure anyone else for that matter)

I hail from the US, and from what I can tell, $80-$100 seems to be the sweet spot at getting some decent 80 plus certified units in the wattage range I'm looking for. I get a little concerned with anything sub $60 since I don't know what to steer away from. My setup will consist of the following energy suckers. Mainly a i7 2600k, a Radeon 6870 (with a probable 2nd in the very near future) couple HDs (one being a SSD), and an optical drive. I'll be looking in the 650 watt range with 750w most likely overkill for my needs.

With all the information I've been soaking in over the past couple weeks about everything computer, my poor brain is stuffed and a bit fried. I looked through some example combo deals for units at Newegg in hopes of finding a little something to match my needs, and usually a case is a good combo bet. (but that's a whole other topic for another thread)

I'd link some PSU examples from Newegg, but I already feel dumb enough as it is. What am I looking for guys? Could you toss me a couple examples of what I need to be looking at, and why I'd want that PSUs particular feature or advantage over something else?

More about : psu

a b ) Power supply
July 30, 2011 6:26:33 AM

There was a recent article on power supplies that discussed all the different brands and who really made them. Might be worth looking for it.

However, I would suggest you get a good brand name power supply, even if it cost you a few extra dollars. Power problems are a major pain in the body part of your choice to diagnose. Worse, cheap power supplies are notorious for blowing up and taking other pieces of hardware with them, as well as claiming much higher power ratings than they should.

I would suggest you consider something from Seasonic, Antec, or Corsair. My last build used a Seasonic X-650 to power an i7 2600 and a GTX580 (hard drives and optical drives are almost negligible in this) - it's delightfully quiet. If you do want a second 6870, it wouldn't hurt to get a 750.
m
0
l
Related resources
July 30, 2011 6:57:15 AM

compulsivebuilder said:

However, I would suggest you get a good brand name power supply, even if it cost you a few extra dollars. Power problems are a major pain in the body part of your choice to diagnose. Worse, cheap power supplies are notorious for blowing up and taking other pieces of hardware with them, as well as claiming much higher power ratings than they should.


Thanks for the link Hen. These are some of the reasons I have some doubts about making sure I pick the right PSU for the job. I was pretty certain a good 650w would be able to handle 2 6870s, but I could be wrong. A 750w would give me some future wiggle room in case I ever wanted to attach a death ray or something else just as cool so that may be a good option. That's why I decided to go with the 2600k over the 2500k. I'd rather have a little more than I need if I ever want it, than want it, and can't get it.
m
0
l
a b ) Power supply
July 30, 2011 7:25:23 AM

wow, you'll be running with 2x 6870 , budget and a lot of power requires minimum PSu 850W, budget $100 for a big power is not enough, then please see HX 750 : Price after rebate: $124.00 or HX850W Price after rebate: $154.99 ... it will enough for Corsfire 6870 (power consumption just 449W)
http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-CMPSU-850HX-850-Watt-Prof...
m
0
l
July 31, 2011 5:28:01 AM

last I checked a 750w would suit me just fine unless someone else agrees for some reason.
m
0
l
a c 276 ) Power supply
July 31, 2011 6:26:37 AM

6870s are reasonably low power so a good 750W is plenty even with a fair amount of OCing.

Good 750W units to look at,
XFX 750W XXX edition(semi modular)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
XFX 750W Core Edition (Non modular)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Corsair 750TX V2(non modular)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Antec EA 750 (semi modular)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The EA750 isnt quite as strong as the other and doesnt have quite as long of a warranty but would still do quite well for about 5 years if you are on a tight budget now, my personal preference would be the XFX 750W XXX edition, its a nice unit with modular cables, and now that it no longer has a radioactive green fan there isnt any significant flaws with it.
m
0
l
a c 243 ) Power supply
July 31, 2011 10:50:16 AM

hunter315 said:

Antec EA 750 (non modular)


I thought that once myself, I mean an Earthwatts that's modular, come on ?
But it is semi-modular.
m
0
l
a c 276 ) Power supply
July 31, 2011 4:53:08 PM

I had thought it was modular but when i looked at the pictures on newegg to double check the mass bundle of wires covered the modular connectors so i wasnt sure. Updated to be correct.
m
0
l
!