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laptop energy efficiency

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 8, 2005 8:11:38 PM

Archived from groups: sci.energy,comp.sys.laptops,sci.environment,comp.arch (More info?)

Hi all,

I recently acquired a Kill-a-Watt power meter which
tells me how much electricity is being used by any
125-VAC appliance I desire to test.

I was amazed to see that my new Toshiba laptop,
which uses a Celeron M processor 1.5 GHz and has a big
15 inch display, is very energy efficient indeed
especially when compared to my previous Toshiba.

Running simple programs like a word processor
and web browser, it averages about 20 watts only.
That's when I have the wireless card active also.

When I'm running it at full tilt with the CPU
load at 100% and the hard drive being accessed
and wireless turned on, it only uses 30 watts.

This is a big savings over my last Toshiba, which
used 60 watts, which was almost an identical
computer but had a Celeron 2.4 GHz.

I suspect the CPU is the major factor.

The Celeron M is supposed to be more power efficient
than the Celeron, plus it is slower. Although
Intel says its power savings circuitry is inferior
to that of a Pentium M.

YF
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 9, 2005 1:12:42 AM

Archived from groups: sci.energy,comp.sys.laptops,sci.environment,comp.arch (More info?)

Heat is the enemy of chip life and error free computing.
It is fairly easy to cool a hotter processor in a tower config.,
but the compactness of a laptop makes it more easy if the heat is not
created in the first place, leading to better engineering.
My Apple PowerBook gets quite warm, especially when charging the
battery.
The heat from the G5 processor has made a delay in the PowerBook
upgrade march.
My fan just came on.

tesseract
May 9, 2005 7:05:41 AM

Archived from groups: sci.energy,comp.sys.laptops,sci.environment,comp.arch (More info?)

In comp.sys.laptops yarmfelder@yahoo.com wrote:
: Hi all,

: I recently acquired a Kill-a-Watt power meter which
: tells me how much electricity is being used by any
: 125-VAC appliance I desire to test.

: I was amazed to see that my new Toshiba laptop,
: which uses a Celeron M processor 1.5 GHz and has a big
: 15 inch display, is very energy efficient indeed
: especially when compared to my previous Toshiba.

: Running simple programs like a word processor
: and web browser, it averages about 20 watts only.
: That's when I have the wireless card active also.

: When I'm running it at full tilt with the CPU
: load at 100% and the hard drive being accessed
: and wireless turned on, it only uses 30 watts.

: This is a big savings over my last Toshiba, which
: used 60 watts, which was almost an identical
: computer but had a Celeron 2.4 GHz.

: I suspect the CPU is the major factor.

: The Celeron M is supposed to be more power efficient
: than the Celeron, plus it is slower. Although
: Intel says its power savings circuitry is inferior
: to that of a Pentium M.

Because the Celeron M (Pentium M) and Mobile Celeron (Pentium 4) are
different architectures, you can't say the 1.5GHZ C-M is automatically
slower than the 2.4GHZ Mobile Celeron. They might be quite similiar.

The power savings you quote sounds about right. Just look at the CPU
specs from Intel. The Pentium M uses quite a lot less power than the
Pentium 4 family.

Andrew
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