How to connect HD6850 with Analog TV?

Hello.

I wish to connect my HD6850 Graphics card to my old 21.5" TV. The TV has analog TV aerial plug and 3 pin RCA connectors.






I wish to have both the Audio and Video from the TV. So what do I need to accomplish it? I think only HDMI is able to carry both audio-video signals. So will a cable with HDMI on one end and 3-pin RCA on the other end will give me Audio-Video from my TV? If not, then what else would I need?

Also, my card's one DVI is used by my PC monitor, so will it be able to use another port for connection? I have heard that some cards are incapable of using both DVI or one DVI and one HDMI at the same time?

My Specs:
CPU: AMD Phenom II X2 555 Black Edition Link
Motherboard: ASRock M3A785GXH Link
GPU: ASUS 1GB 256-bit Radeon HD 6850 DirectCU Link
RAM: Kingston HyperX 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3 Link


Thank you for your help.
4 answers Last reply
More about connect hd6850 analog
  1. Since your GPU doesn't have a TV-out function, it won't work. There are cables that can be used to make the physical connection from VGA to RCA, but your GPU can't make the required digital to analog conversion necessary to use your TV.

    Sorry. Good luck!
  2. First, converting the video signal
    Your video signal must go through many conversions to accommodate this. With each conversion signal degradation is introduced. Due to the number of conversions, there are many points of potential hardware failure. Because there are many pieces of hardware involved, it can get quite expensive. It'll all start from one of the DVI ports on your video card.

    I do not recommend doing this, but it can be done and it is costly.

    To convert the digital video signal to a composite:
    First, use a DVI to VGA adapter ($9):
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814999020&cm_re=dvi_to_vga_adapter-_-14-999-020-_-Product

    Use a 15 pin male to male vga cable ($12) - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814998021&cm_re=vga_cable%5c-_-14-998-021-_-Product - to connect to a VGA to component converter ($34):
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812156028&cm_re=vga_to_composite_cable-_-12-156-028-_-Product

    Use a component video cable - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812196091&cm_re=component_video_cable-_-12-196-091-_-Product ($20) - to connect to a component video to a composite video signal ($135):
    http://www.hdtvsupply.com/component-to-composite-adapter.html

    Connect the yellow composite video signal from the converter to your TV's composite video input using a composite video cable ($15):
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16882196068&cm_re=composite_video_cable-_-82-196-068-_-Product

    There you have it. $235 later, you can connect your DVI to the TV. You'll have to dumb down your PCs resolution for this monitor to meet 480i of the composite signal.

    Now for the audio (it's a little easier)
    Using your motherboard sound, connect your line out from your motherboard to the right and left rca audio jacks on the television using this stereo 3.5mm to R/L audio splitter ($11):
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16882196156&cm_re=3.5mm_to_rca-_-82-196-156-_-Product

    It will cost you $246 total to connect audio and video to the TV set. Beside the fact there are multiple potential points of failure, even though the video signal can be converted, there's risk involved with the fact the video card won't detect anything plugged into the DVI port.

    On the other hand, here's a fine brand-new energy star compliant HD 1080p LED monitor with speakers for $159.99:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236100&Tpk=21%20inch%20monitor%20stereo

    And a high-quality HDMI cable ($8):
    http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=181-774

    For $170 you have a much better setup with new equipment.

    It's your choice.
  3. ubercake said:
    First, converting the video signal
    Your video signal must go through many conversions to accommodate this. With each conversion signal degradation is introduced. Due to the number of conversions, there are many points of potential hardware failure. Because there are many pieces of hardware involved, it can get quite expensive. It'll all start from one of the DVI ports on your video card.

    I do not recommend doing this, but it can be done and it is costly.

    To convert the digital video signal to a composite:
    First, use a DVI to VGA adapter ($9):
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814999020&cm_re=dvi_to_vga_adapter-_-14-999-020-_-Product

    Use a 15 pin male to male vga cable ($12) - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814998021&cm_re=vga_cable%5c-_-14-998-021-_-Product - to connect to a VGA to component converter ($34):
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812156028&cm_re=vga_to_composite_cable-_-12-156-028-_-Product

    Use a component video cable - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812196091&cm_re=component_video_cable-_-12-196-091-_-Product ($20) - to connect to a component video to a composite video signal ($135):
    http://www.hdtvsupply.com/component-to-composite-adapter.html

    Connect the yellow composite video signal from the converter to your TV's composite video input using a composite video cable ($15):
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16882196068&cm_re=composite_video_cable-_-82-196-068-_-Product

    There you have it. $235 later, you can connect your DVI to the TV. You'll have to dumb down your PCs resolution for this monitor to meet 480i of the composite signal.

    Now for the audio (it's a little easier)
    Using your motherboard sound, connect your line out from your motherboard to the right and left rca audio jacks on the television using this stereo 3.5mm to R/L audio splitter ($11):
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16882196156&cm_re=3.5mm_to_rca-_-82-196-156-_-Product

    It will cost you $246 total to connect audio and video to the TV set. Beside the fact there are multiple potential points of failure, even though the video signal can be converted, there's risk involved with the fact the video card won't detect anything plugged into the DVI port.

    On the other hand, here's a fine brand-new energy star compliant HD 1080p LED monitor with speakers for $159.99:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236100&Tpk=21%20inch%20monitor%20stereo

    And a high-quality HDMI cable ($8):
    http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=181-774

    For $170 you have a much better setup with new equipment.

    It's your choice.


    +1 to ubercake. This is all possible and expensive and a pain to configure. I also agree with ubercake's assessment that this is not a recommended course of action. It really just isn't worth the hassle and why I didn't refer to OP down such a path. Regardless, as ubercake correctly points out, it can be made to work.
  4. Thank you for your replies. I guess that buying a new TV with HDMI will be the best option. But it is something I don't wish to do in the near future coz if I'm buying, I'd buy a 47" or bigger and I nether have money, nor space (as of now!) to accommodate it.

    Thanks for the help though :)
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