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New $1000 gaming rig

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May 2, 2011 1:13:42 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: 1-2 months


Budget: $1000

Parts Not Required: keyboard, mouse, headset, monitor

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: newegg.com

Country of Origin: USA

Overclocking: Yes

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe

Monitor Resolution: 1680x1050 now - 1920x1200 in the future

Additional Comments: I am looking for advice for my next gaming pc. It is important to keep it at $1000 to start. I plan on upgrading the video card a couple months down the road and putting the one listed below into my old pc at that time.

COOLER MASTER HAF 932 Advanced
Sparkle Computer Corp 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Power Supply
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz
Noctua NH-D14 120mm & 140mm SSO CPU Cooler
MSI P67A-GD65 (B3) LGA 1155
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600
SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 5670 (Redwood) 512MB
Western Digital Caviar Black 500GB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5"
ASUS Black 24X DVD Burner

More about : 1000 gaming rig

May 2, 2011 1:35:28 PM

After reviewing the parts for your pc build i have just a couple of questions to ask...

Why sparkle for your PSU?
Why G.Skill for Memory?
Why Sapphire For GPU?
Why MSI for your mobo?


I'm not so sure that you will need such a big fan for cooling your cpu?

If you want to game spend money on the GPU and leave the CPU at the recommended clock speed which is 3.3GHz.

By over-clocking your chips you significantly decrease the life of you components with little gains
Water cooling would be optimal to produce the gains you want from over-clocking but your GPU is gonna do all the major calculations so make sure you get a good GPU

I use radeon and fell in love with the customization it allows

I've never used G.skill so i dont have much to say about memory

And your prob gonna want a bigger hard-drive nowadays games take up tons of hdd space

Thats my input so far keep in mind you want to buy products with long warranties so you dont have to worry about replacing parts with out of pocket cash.

Ill check back again soon to see the answers to the questions i asked.



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May 2, 2011 1:40:54 PM

I plan on replacing that low end video card not long after I get the pc and putting the 5670 into my older computer.. my wife just doesn't want me to spend much over $1k all at once ;)  I also plan on adding an SSD in the future as well.

I have had good experiences with G.Skill ram in the past, and it is ram that will fit under the huge heatsink.

I looked at alot of PSUs, and the sparkle seems to be very high quality, but I haven't used one before
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Best solution

May 2, 2011 2:10:37 PM

g5insider said:
After reviewing the parts for your pc build i have just a couple of questions to ask...

Why sparkle for your PSU?
Why G.Skill for Memory?
Why Sapphire For GPU?
Why MSI for your mobo?

If you want to game spend money on the GPU and leave the CPU at the recommended clock speed which is 3.3GHz.

By over-clocking your chips you significantly decrease the life of you components with little gains
Water cooling would be optimal to produce the gains you want from over-clocking but your GPU is gonna do all the major calculations so make sure you get a good GPU

I've never used G.skill so i dont have much to say about memory


Oh, ok let me clarify a few things for you and the OP.
1. Sparkle is not a bad PSU company. Their OEM is great wall which has made many good units. Jonnyguru reviewed the 1200W unit in that line.
http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviewGs&op...

However, for the money, might as well grab a seasonic x-750
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Seasonic is the top PSU OEM right now, the Corsair AX750 is identical to that x750 cept more money.

2. G Skill is the brand of choice on these forums. Low voltage, overclocks extremely well, excellent customer service and some of the best prices.

3. Overclocking doesn't actually decrease system life as long as you keep voltages and temps under control. Using an aftermarket cooler and ocing to w/o a v could actually increase the system life expectancy simply because the aftermarket HSF is keeping temps lower than the stock HSF. Regardless, CPU's are designed to last over a decade so it's not like you've got much to worry about. Detailed explanation of the ECE stuff behind this below.

How OCing can damage a CPU
Normally, electrons stay around their atom's and don't go wandering
off. So in a CPU, they'll stay in one transistor and not move to
others. However, if you've learnt quantum tunneling principles, you'll
know it's actually possible for electrons to escape from energy wells,
even infinitely deep ones, it's just very uncommon.

Now, a transistor in a CPU is made from alternating + and - doped and
undoped silicon. Once in a while, an electron will escape and bury a
couple atoms into an adjourning transistor, and if this happens enough
times, eventually all the way through to the adjourning transistor
before coming back to it's orbit.

Keep doing this and eventually an electron doesn't come back, but
stays attached to an atom in the adjourning undoped section of
silicon. Over time (usually years), this tunneling causes a hole to be
formed between two adjourning transistors and allows free electron
flow. This bypasses the "gates" between the transistors and as a
result, the computer will misread this resulting in an error.

This process is called silicon degradation and eventually results in a
complete CPU failure.

Now, as to where overclocking comes in.

If you know about electron orbital theory, the more energy an electron
has, the more likely it is to leave it's orbit and tunnel. IE if yur
CPU is running hot, or has a considerably higher voltage going through
it, electrons tunnel in much higher numbers. As a result, the more you
OC, the faster you make those tunnel which cause silicon degradation.

In addition, if you increase the voltage enough, you can actually
physically destroy the silicon lattice of the gates within a
processor. This is VERY VERY high though, much more than you'll probably be able to boot on, so I wouldn't worry about this.

OC and Heat
Boosting F, has a very minor, almost insignificant heat increase.

It's v increase that dramatically increases heat.

Power Dissipation = PD in Watt
Voltage = Volt
Freq = Hz
C= Capacitance in Farads

Total PD in Watt = C x F x V^2
As C doesn't change (ok it technically does, but for the sake of
keeping the math simply we can assume it doesn't)


If you actually plug in numbers and graph the function, the heat
increase due to a freq increase is minute compared to the heat
increase from a v increase, as one increases exponentially, the other
linearly.

Indeed, the more you increase the V, the less the F part of the
equation is relevant to the total temp.


Looking at real world data, look at the power usage increase in Tom's
i5 efficiency article.
http://www.tomshardware.com/review [...] 500-7.html

Each bump was a constant 10mhz clock speed increase, but due to the
exponential nature of the voltage increase contribution to PD, the
graph is not linear, and power usage does not increase until you start
seeing large v increases.

Power usage directly translates into heat.

As for actual temps, it's more complicated than purely based on power
dissipation
Cpu temperature = (Total PD in Watt) x (HSF's Thermal Resistance in
C/W) + (Ambient Temp in Celcius)

For comparison purposes the resistance and ambient can be considered
constant (technically not true once again, as resistance changes
slightly with temp, and ambient increases with more heat output).

Intel also has a nice presentation on how they determine/balance heat, noise and fan control here:
ftp://81.30.226.136/skoleni/mb,%20cpu,%20mem/Tcontrol%2...

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May 2, 2011 2:15:02 PM

For the OP, Couple suggestions,

1. Dont really need a 932, grab a HAF 922 which is already large as most full towers and save yourself some money.

2. Spinpoint F3 or 7200.12 are the best HD choices right now. Cheaper and better than the equivalent WD's.

3. The Thermalright Silver arrow has topped the NH-D14 for best air HSf right now. It's also cheaper and has extremely quiet fans. .
http://www.amazon.com/THERMALRIGHT-SILVER-ARROW-DUAL14C...

However, the SB cpus really are not hot running at all, so you'd be fine with a much cheaper CM hyper 212+ or Scythe Mugen 2.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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May 2, 2011 3:06:43 PM

I updated my newegg wishlist (saving planned hardware purchases there) to the seasonic x750 PSU and the CM Hyper 212+

I originally had a 1TB spinpoint f3 in mind, but decided to get something sata 6.0 Gb/s. Is it not worth going for the sata 6 GB/s?
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Anonymous
May 2, 2011 3:28:57 PM

You don't need 6gb/s. Even most ssds don't need 6gb/s. Also, samsung spinpoints 3gb/s equal or outperform the wd 6gb/s.
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May 2, 2011 3:29:23 PM

thanks!
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Anonymous
May 2, 2011 3:32:37 PM

wait... if you want you should get the z68 version of the gigabyte motherboard when it comes out. I think they cost only $10 more than the p67 versions.
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May 2, 2011 3:36:37 PM

I wont be ordering for a month or two, just recently convinced my wife that its time to replace the gaming pc. I haven't seen much about the z68s I will look around for more info
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May 2, 2011 4:01:28 PM

z68 is supposedly coming out next week, assuming Intel releases on time.
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May 2, 2011 5:04:46 PM

Looking a the z68 info, it seems like I may be able to skip buying a temporary GPU and just use the integrated graphics until I can buy a high end GPU.
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May 3, 2011 4:08:00 PM

banthracis thanks for the information i was just wondering about the brand names i never really used them and wanted to know why they became the brand choice of the consumer

i find that lots of people just buy products without really knowing about them
i do like OCZ their products have proven well to me and im a big fan of asus MoBos

kudos for the education banthracis teach us more =)


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May 3, 2011 4:23:54 PM

Well OCZ has had some issues lately, not a big fan of them anymore.
They're leaving the RAM business altogether and their RAM last couple years has been really poor.

OCZ also bought out PC power and cooling and promptly switched from Seasonic as their OEM to the much inferior Sirtec in the name of greater profits. As a result, the brand's PSU's went from top notch, to mediocre. They've recently added seasonic units back to the product line, but I still don't really trust them.

They also recently pulled a fast one on customers by switching the flash in vertex 2 drives from 34nm to 25nm without telling anyone so they could increase their profits. This resulted in decreased performance and loss of HD space for vertex 2 drives. They've since tried to fix this by offering replacements, but the fact that they kept trying to boost profits by substituting their brand name products with cheaper/crappier alternatives has made me distrust OCZ.
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May 13, 2011 1:24:35 AM

Best answer selected by cmadrid.
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