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choice of cameras

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Anonymous
February 22, 2005 8:03:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hello,

I'm trying to choose which digital camera to buy.

I've identified the following models that appeal to me:

Canon Powershot S70
Canon Powershot A95
Olympus C-770 UltraZoom
Sony DSC-V1
Sony DSC-V3
Sony DSC-W1/W12

The problem is that these models span quite a range of specifications,
such as pixels, zoom and price.

I do have a preference for a "pocketable" camera. I've looked at the
other Olympus models, such as the 5050/5060/8080 but decided they were
too heavy and bulky.

I want a camera that will take excellent photos out of the box (point
and shoot) that will look great on A4 paper, but which also has manual
features to allow me to develop my photo skills and be creative.

If one had to choose just one of these, diregarding price, which one
would it be?

Also, are there any special features, faults or shortcomings that
distinguish one from the others?

Any comments/advice/recommendations will be gratefully received.

Regards,
Brett Patterson

More about : choice cameras

Anonymous
February 22, 2005 5:50:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

brett.patterson@physics.org wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I'm trying to choose which digital camera to buy.
>
> I've identified the following models that appeal to me:
>
> Canon Powershot S70
> Canon Powershot A95
> Olympus C-770 UltraZoom
> Sony DSC-V1
> Sony DSC-V3
> Sony DSC-W1/W12
>
> The problem is that these models span quite a range of specifications,
> such as pixels, zoom and price.
>
> I do have a preference for a "pocketable" camera. I've looked at the
> other Olympus models, such as the 5050/5060/8080 but decided they were
> too heavy and bulky.
>
> I want a camera that will take excellent photos out of the box (point
> and shoot) that will look great on A4 paper, but which also has manual
> features to allow me to develop my photo skills and be creative.
>
> If one had to choose just one of these, diregarding price, which one
> would it be?
>
> Also, are there any special features, faults or shortcomings that
> distinguish one from the others?
>
> Any comments/advice/recommendations will be gratefully received.
>
> Regards,
> Brett Patterson

First I believe you have a list of very fine cameras, all of them. As
you know some are better at some things than others. However I doubt if you
can go wrong with any of those listed.

To help you decide, I will make one suggestion that is almost always
ignored, but I believe is a serious factor. Ergonomics is important. If
the camera does not fit your hands and if the function of the camera does
not fit the way you feel comfortable working with a camera, it will never be
the best choice for you. This is a very personal thing. I can say that in
general people with large hands, older people and young kids almost all will
like the larger camera with larger controls not too close together. On the
other hand a young adult may prefer the smaller camera with more cramped
controls. Keep in mind that it is the controls that YOU use most often that
are important. So go out there and get your hands on the cameras you are
considering. See how they feel. See how they fit in your pocket, see how
difficult it is to actually take a photo or two and reset controls display a
picture etc.

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
February 22, 2005 5:50:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Amen to the ergonomics thing! I have a Sony DSC-F828 that I like. I needed
a backup camera so I bought a 4 meg popular brand camera smaller than a king
size cigarette pack. It works great but I don't like it due to its small
size in my BIG mitts!

"Joseph Meehan" <sligojoe_Spamno@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:lFHSd.210$m14.131@fe2.columbus.rr.com...
> brett.patterson@physics.org wrote:
>> Hello,
>>
>> I'm trying to choose which digital camera to buy.
>>
>> I've identified the following models that appeal to me:
>>
>> Canon Powershot S70
>> Canon Powershot A95
>> Olympus C-770 UltraZoom
>> Sony DSC-V1
>> Sony DSC-V3
>> Sony DSC-W1/W12
>>
>> The problem is that these models span quite a range of specifications,
>> such as pixels, zoom and price.
>>
>> I do have a preference for a "pocketable" camera. I've looked at the
>> other Olympus models, such as the 5050/5060/8080 but decided they were
>> too heavy and bulky.
>>
>> I want a camera that will take excellent photos out of the box (point
>> and shoot) that will look great on A4 paper, but which also has manual
>> features to allow me to develop my photo skills and be creative.
>>
>> If one had to choose just one of these, diregarding price, which one
>> would it be?
>>
>> Also, are there any special features, faults or shortcomings that
>> distinguish one from the others?
>>
>> Any comments/advice/recommendations will be gratefully received.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Brett Patterson
>
> First I believe you have a list of very fine cameras, all of them. As
> you know some are better at some things than others. However I doubt if
> you can go wrong with any of those listed.
>
> To help you decide, I will make one suggestion that is almost always
> ignored, but I believe is a serious factor. Ergonomics is important. If
> the camera does not fit your hands and if the function of the camera does
> not fit the way you feel comfortable working with a camera, it will never
> be the best choice for you. This is a very personal thing. I can say
> that in general people with large hands, older people and young kids
> almost all will like the larger camera with larger controls not too close
> together. On the other hand a young adult may prefer the smaller camera
> with more cramped controls. Keep in mind that it is the controls that YOU
> use most often that are important. So go out there and get your hands on
> the cameras you are considering. See how they feel. See how they fit in
> your pocket, see how difficult it is to actually take a photo or two and
> reset controls display a picture etc.
>
> --
> Joseph Meehan
>
> 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
>
Related resources
February 22, 2005 6:40:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 22 Feb 2005 05:03:24 -0800, brett.patterson@physics.org wrote:

>Canon Powershot S70

Brett, I'm not sure about the whole list but this particular camera
has a 28mm equivalent focal length at its wide zoom extent. I have the
S60 version and it's because of the 28mm that I have it. I find the
S60 to be an extremely capable camera.

Canon has put a lot of thought and experience into this camera line.
It's kind of a brick in terms of ergonomics, but I find that it is
capable of taking great pictures.

I recently took this camera and a Leica M6 with 35mm and 50mm lens on
a couple of business trips. The Canon S60 turned out to be my stealth
camera at the Budapest Opera and other functions. The 28mm lens at
ISO400 and f2.8 was really effective on the interior shots (prior and
after the performance, but not during). I used it in very low lighted
restaurants when a strobe was necessary. Generally very easy to use.

What can I say.... I really like this camera. However, if 28mm is not
your forte, then I would put the find my value elsewhere. If 28mm is
your forte, I don't think you can do better in this footprint.

BTW: The S60 is a 5MP camera (no it's not a misprint) and I print many
of my photos in 4 x 6 ratio. Even with cropping, the 5MP(-) files
deliver quality prints well beyond 8x12. ISO 400 is a bit noisy.

Regards,
Roger
Anonymous
February 23, 2005 12:25:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks for all the help so far!

I see I need to add these to my list:

Canon PowerShot A60
Canon PowerShot A520

Again, any comments about inherent pros or cons, warnings, fault, or
special features, would be gratefully received.

Brett
Anonymous
February 23, 2005 12:33:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Oops!

I mean S60, not A60.

Brett
February 23, 2005 11:10:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi,

Check out the new Canon A510/A520 . They are the successors to the Canon
A75/85.

It is >10% smaller in size, >20% lighter and uses only 2 AA size batteries
with no loss in battery performance due to their switch from CF card to
SD/MMC card.

It has just been launched and mine works exactly as I expected it to and I
see this as the hit digital camera product for 2005.


<brett.patterson@physics.org> wrote in message
news:1109077404.368663.53070@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> Hello,
>
> I'm trying to choose which digital camera to buy.
>
> I've identified the following models that appeal to me:
>
> Canon Powershot S70
> Canon Powershot A95
> Olympus C-770 UltraZoom
> Sony DSC-V1
> Sony DSC-V3
> Sony DSC-W1/W12
>
> The problem is that these models span quite a range of specifications,
> such as pixels, zoom and price.
>
> I do have a preference for a "pocketable" camera. I've looked at the
> other Olympus models, such as the 5050/5060/8080 but decided they were
> too heavy and bulky.
>
> I want a camera that will take excellent photos out of the box (point
> and shoot) that will look great on A4 paper, but which also has manual
> features to allow me to develop my photo skills and be creative.
>
> If one had to choose just one of these, diregarding price, which one
> would it be?
>
> Also, are there any special features, faults or shortcomings that
> distinguish one from the others?
>
> Any comments/advice/recommendations will be gratefully received.
>
> Regards,
> Brett Patterson
>
March 14, 2005 2:58:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 22 Feb 2005 05:03:24 -0800, brett.patterson@physics.org wrote:

>Hello,
>
>I'm trying to choose which digital camera to buy.
>
>I've identified the following models that appeal to me:
>
>Canon Powershot S70

Brett,

Based on my Powershot S60 experience, I would strongly recommend the
S70 - especially if you like to use wide angle lenses. The S60/S70
have a 28mm-100mm equivalent lens. I use mine at 28mm for many of my
street photographs, in fact I find myself using other focal lengths
very little. The fact that this camera offers the 28mm lens equivalent
was one of the reasons I picked the camera. However, the other
features are also exceptional and I find the flash pre-exposure very
useful.

Regards,
Roger
!