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Power suplly requirement for Intel i5 2500k

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May 5, 2011 7:46:34 AM

Hello


Kindly suggest the a good power supply with watts as per given new system details.

my budget is around $50.00


Intel i5 2500k ( i will be overclocking)

Z68 Motherboard

An average Add-on graphic card

1TB Hard disk

4GB DDR3 Ram

1 DVD Writer


Please also answer that is it possible that any company claim to be 600w power supply but actually providing lower power
like 500w or 450w in reality.

what all things i should keep in mind when buying a new power supply. ( EXCEPT 80 PLUS CERTIFICATE )
a b B Homebuilt system
May 5, 2011 8:33:00 AM

It depends on how they state their wattage. You can have a 600W system with 2 12V rails each supplying 25A to get your 600W or you can have 4 12V rails each supplying 12.5 and get a 600W supply. The problem with additional rails is the amperage going through each one is less. Therefore most prefer a solid power supply with a single 12V rail with enough Amps for their needs.

Depending on what your definition of "average" graphic card is that would probably be 400W to 500W supply. I'd recommend a seasonic, corsair, antec supply. for $50 I'd pick http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (after rebate) or for 10 dollars more http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 5, 2011 9:20:31 AM

If you are planning on overclocking, I'd not be trying to skimp on costs with a 450 watt PSU....; I'd be looking at a quality Antec/ThermalTake 650 to 700 watt unit, so you don't have to worry about it later if you do add in a high end GPU. Find one certified 80Plus/SLI-Ready, even if you don't think you'll need it.
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May 5, 2011 9:27:22 AM

crewton said:
It depends on how they state their wattage. You can have a 600W system with 2 12V rails each supplying 25A to get your 600W or you can have 4 12V rails each supplying 12.5 and get a 600W supply. The problem with additional rails is the amperage going through each one is less. Therefore most prefer a solid power supply with a single 12V rail with enough Amps for their needs.

Depending on what your definition of "average" graphic card is that would probably be 400W to 500W supply. I'd recommend a seasonic, corsair, antec supply. for $50 I'd pick http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (after rebate) or for 10 dollars more http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



If i don't go for a big brand power supply then i can get 500W power supply at very cheap rate

so what is the main drawback for cheap power supply other then saving money.

1. Does it impact system performance anyhow?

2. can cheap power supply create problem when doing overclocking?

3. Do i need to take care of numbers of connectors that a power supply is providing when purchasing a new P.S.U?
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a b B Homebuilt system
May 5, 2011 9:36:25 AM

Cheap power supplies like I tried to say, generally skimp out on Amperage for your system. They also tend to be less reliable and end up ruining your system.

I went cheap on my first computer back in the day and got a sunbeam 680W thinking it would be great (it was like $35)...it was until it fried my graphics card. it didn't have enough power for my gtx 260. Now I go with Corsair and no worries.

If you want to go cheap it's up to you but from my standpoint its far cheaper in the long run to get a quality psu.
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May 5, 2011 9:39:21 AM

mdd1963 said:
If you are planning on overclocking, I'd not be trying to skimp on costs with a 450 watt PSU....; I'd be looking at a quality Antec/ThermalTake 650 to 700 watt unit, so you don't have to worry about it later if you do add in a high end GPU. Find one certified 80Plus/SLI-Ready, even if you don't think you'll need it.




i have read somewhere on internet that if you are getting a cheap power supply of 600W then even though they claim to be 600W but actually they are not and even if they are providing 600W then it is for very shot time like for FEW SECONDS.

is it true?

Is it like that if at the time of overclocking my system requirement is 600W and i am using a cheap power supply, so as it can provide 600W only for few seconds, SO AFTER FEW SECONDS MY SYSTEM WILL CRASH.

:-(
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May 5, 2011 9:53:50 AM

crewton said:
Cheap power supplies like I tried to say, generally skimp out on Amperage for your system. They also tend to be less reliable and end up ruining your system.

I went cheap on my first computer back in the day and got a sunbeam 680W thinking it would be great (it was like $35)...it was until it fried my graphics card. it didn't have enough power for my gtx 260. Now I go with Corsair and no worries.

If you want to go cheap it's up to you but from my standpoint its far cheaper in the long run to get a quality psu.



Could you please told me how can i calculate how much power my system will require?

OR

Please told me how to check what all hardware a P.S.U can support?
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May 5, 2011 12:41:36 PM

The main thing that's gonna consume a lot of power in your system is the graphics card. Without one or with an entry level graphics card a 450 watt will probably be fine. With mid-range graphics cards you're gonna want at least 550w although it varies. High end cards will normally be fine with 650w unless you're going for a 6990 or 590 (which I highly doubt you are :p ). Crossfire and SLI are obviously gonna leave you wanting extra power if you're planning on doing that in the future. This is really only a basic guideline and these numbers can vary.
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May 5, 2011 12:52:56 PM

This is a calculator to see how much power it should all use, new to this stuff here myself but pretty sure it should be pretty accurate

http://www.antec.outervision.com/
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